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From:Tompkins Neil Date:June 24 2010 8:50am
Subject:Re: MySQL Replication
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Thanks for your quick response.

Basically our need for replication is because our websites access a local
MySQL database - which is fine.  In our remote office, we also need to
access this MySQL database too however the connect time/ query speed is very
slow.  At the moment the application in the office needs to update certain
fields (not all).  Therefore I thought we'd look into using replication.

In your opinion what is the best method for us to use ?

Cheers
Neil

On Thu, Jun 24, 2010 at 9:31 AM, Mark Goodge <mark@stripped> wrote:

> On 24/06/2010 09:18, Tompkins Neil wrote:
>
>> HI,
>>
>> We have set-up MySQL Community Server 5.1.46 with Master to Slave
>> replication and everything appears to be working correctly, however I have
>> a
>> couple of questions which I hope somebody can shed some light.
>>
>> (1) When the network connection goes down between the master and slave
>> servers, it would appear that the updates are only sent from the master to
>> the slave, but not from the slave to the master when the connect is
>> re-established.  Is this correct ?
>>
>
> Yes. Replication is one-way by default. If you want two-way replication you
> have to set it up explicitly with both servers simultaneously acting as both
> master and slave.
>
>
>  (2) What is the situation regarding conflicts if the same master and slave
>> record is edited at the same time ?
>>
>
> You shouldn't normally edit records on the slave while it's acting as a
> slave. Replication has two main functions: to provide a "hot backup" of the
> master so that you can switch to the slave as the new master instantly
> should the master fail, and to allow load balancing by performing all reads
> on the slave (or multiple slaves) and updating only the master (eg, where
> you have a web cluster with each web server having its own MySQL instance
> acting as a slave from a central master updated from your CMS).
>
> Two-way replication is possible, but there are rarely any significant
> benefits from it. If you do use two-way replication, you have to implement
> locking at the application level as MySQL doesn't provide it natively.
>
> See the replication FAQ for more information:
>
> http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/replication-faq.html
>
> Mark
> --
> http://mark.goodge.co.uk
>
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Thread
MySQL ReplicationTompkins Neil24 Jun
  • Re: MySQL ReplicationJaime Crespo Rincón24 Jun
    • Re: MySQL ReplicationTompkins Neil24 Jun
      • Re: MySQL ReplicationJaime Crespo Rincón24 Jun
        • Re: MySQL ReplicationTompkins Neil30 Jun
          • Re: MySQL ReplicationJaime Crespo Rincón30 Jun
  • Re: MySQL ReplicationMark Goodge24 Jun
    • Re: MySQL ReplicationTompkins Neil24 Jun
      • Re: MySQL ReplicationJohan De Meersman24 Jun