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From:Bruce Ferrell Date:January 4 2004 4:57pm
Subject:Re: Help:)
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you need a smeicolon at the end of the line

Don Matlock wrote:
> Thank you very much for the prompt reply.
> Yes you were correct, it was the fact that the password had not been
> entered at all...I did the 
> mysql -u root -p
> when prompted for the password I just hit enter and was able to get in.
> 
> Now I have to figure out why its not accepting the password.  I type the
> following command as root in mysql:
> 
> Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
> Your MySQL connection id is 12 to server version: 3.23.49-log
> 
> Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the buffer.
> 
> mysql> SET PASSWORD FOR 'root'@'localhost' = PASSWORD 'xxxxxx'
> 
> This is exactly how I typed it in...(just copied and pasted)
> When I hit enter with that password...I just get a prompt...no
> confirmation the password was accepted or anything.
> Did I type in the command for the pass wrong?
> Don
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Michael Stassen [mailto:Michael.Stassen@stripped] 
> Sent: Sunday, January 04, 2004 2:40 AM
> To: robert_rowe
> Cc: mysql@stripped; Don Matlock
> Subject: Re: Help:)
> 
> 
> robert_rowe wrote:
> 
>>Issuing this command:
>>
>>
>>
>>>mysql>SET PASSWORD FOR 'root'@'localhost' = PASSWORD xxxxxxxxxx
>>
>>set your password to xxxxxxxxxx
> 
> 
> I'm not so sure.  PASSWORD is a function which expects a string.  The 
> correct syntax is
> 
>    SET PASSWORD FOR 'root'@'localhost' = PASSWORD('new_password')
> 
> so I don't believe this worked unless Don is misquoting what he did.
> 
> 
>>You will need to use 
>>
>>mysql -u root -p xxxxxxxxxx
> 
> 
> This will not work.  You may not put a space between the -p and the 
> password.  The space indicates that xxxxxxxxxx is the db to use.  If you
> 
> want to provide the password on the command line (not really a good 
> idea), the syntax is
> 
>    mysql -u root -pxxxxxxxxxx
> 
> See, no space between the -p and the password.
> 
> 
>>from the local machine to get access with the root user.
>>
>>This:
>>
>>mysql -u root -p
>>
>>is specifying a blank password.
> 
> 
> No, it is not.  The -p indicates you want to give a password to 
> authenticate.  Since you didn't provide the password on the command 
> line, mysql will prompt you for it.
> 
> 
>>I believe that this:
>>
>>mysql -u root 
>>
>>will prompt you for the password without echoing it to the screen.
> 
> 
> No.  This will try to authenticate without a password, which will only 
> work if the specified user (root, in this case) has no password.
> 
> Don,
> 
> I expect that when you enter `mysql -u root -p`, you get prompted for a 
> password and then get an error message.  It would help if you would 
> please post the exact text of the error message.  In the meantime, try 
> your old password (or no password, `mysql -u root`, if root didn't have 
> one before), in case the SET PASSWORD failed.
> 
> Alternatively, take a look at "How to Reset a Forgotten Root Password" 
> <http://www.mysql.com/doc/en/Resetting_permissions.html> in the manual 
> for the directions on how to use --skip-grant-tables to recover your 
> root mysql password.
> 
> Michael
> 
> 
> 
> 

Thread
Help:)Don Matlock4 Jan
  • Re: Help:)robert_rowe4 Jan
    • Re: Help:)Michael Stassen4 Jan
      • RE: Help:)Don Matlock4 Jan
        • RE: Help:)Larry Brown4 Jan
          • Re: Help:)Michael Stassen4 Jan
        • Re: Help:)Bruce Ferrell4 Jan