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From:Brent Baisley Date:November 7 2003 6:52pm
Subject:Re: Need help comparing MySQL to MS SQL Server
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It sounds like a copy and paste from Microsoft, but that is just my 
guess. An objective recommendation with show pluses and minuses of 
both. It most definitely does not sound like this consultant is 
qualified to suggest a database product. What about PostgresSQL, 
Oracle, Sybase, DB2? They all at least match the features of SQL 
Server, except maybe Postgres, and they run on more platforms and are 
more scalable.
MySQL does have transaction support in the form of InnoDB tables. 
Sub-queries are now supported in v4, although not the fastest 
implementation. The other areas MySQL is lacking.
When I first started using MySQL, subqueries were not supported and I 
found it frustrating. Since then I have truly acquired in depth 
knowledge of left and right joins and other techniques that I really 
didn't have before. I think I now write better, faster queries because 
I was forced to learn a new technique. I now have better knowledge of 
SQL. Not sure if that was a good or bad point.

If your needs are simple, you can get by without stored procedures and 
triggers. Referential integrity can be "enforced" in your front-end 
code.
Here is a question: how much would it cost to give everyone a copy of 
the database to play with? On their laptop, home computer? Nothing for 
MySQL or Postgres.
What front-end will be used? Your options for SQL Server are kind of 
limited.


On Friday, November 7, 2003, at 11:39 AM, KEVIN ZEMBOWER wrote:

> I don't know whether the consultant wrote this himself, or if it came 
> from somewhere. It could be Microsoft advertizement, for all I know. 
> Most of the terms aren't familiar to me, like "sub-queries" or 
> "referential integrity". I feel out of my depth evaluating this 
> comparison.
>
> My questions are:
> 1. Is this a fair comparison of MySQL and MS SQL Server 2000?
> 2. Is this up to date with the current status of MySQL?
> 3. Would the deficiencies pointed out in MySQL, if true, apply to the 
> type of work we envision? Granted, I haven't given you all much 
> information about what we hope to do with an SQL engine, but I don't 
> think it will be very sophisticated.
>
> Thank you for all your thoughts and comments.
>
-- 
Brent Baisley
Systems Architect
Landover Associates, Inc.
Search & Advisory Services for Advanced Technology Environments
p: 212.759.6400/800.759.0577

Thread
Need help comparing MySQL to MS SQL ServerKEVIN ZEMBOWER7 Nov
  • Re: Need help comparing MySQL to MS SQL ServerMartijn Tonies7 Nov
  • Re: Need help comparing MySQL to MS SQL ServerBrent Baisley7 Nov
Re: Need help comparing MySQL to MS SQL ServerKEVIN ZEMBOWER7 Nov
  • Re: Need help comparing MySQL to MS SQL ServerMartijn Tonies7 Nov
Re: Need help comparing MySQL to MS SQL ServerNestor Florez7 Nov
Re: Need help comparing MySQL to MS SQL ServerKEVIN ZEMBOWER7 Nov
  • Re: Need help comparing MySQL to MS SQL ServerJeff Mathis7 Nov
RE: Need help comparing MySQL to MS SQL ServerJohn Griffin7 Nov
Re: Need help comparing MySQL to MS SQL ServerPeter Gulutzan18 Nov