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From:paul Date:January 10 2006 6:02pm
Subject:svn commit - mysqldoc@docsrva: r754 - in trunk: . refman-4.1 refman-5.0 refman-5.1
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Author: paul
Date: 2006-01-10 19:02:24 +0100 (Tue, 10 Jan 2006)
New Revision: 754

Log:
 r6055@frost:  paul | 2006-01-10 09:56:13 -0600
 General revisions.


Modified:
   trunk/
   trunk/refman-4.1/innodb.xml
   trunk/refman-5.0/innodb.xml
   trunk/refman-5.1/innodb.xml


Property changes on: trunk
___________________________________________________________________
Name: svk:merge
   - b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:6054
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:1994
   + b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:6055
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:1994

Modified: trunk/refman-4.1/innodb.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-4.1/innodb.xml	2006-01-10 17:57:09 UTC (rev 753)
+++ trunk/refman-4.1/innodb.xml	2006-01-10 18:02:24 UTC (rev 754)
@@ -1012,21 +1012,14 @@
 
     <para>
       This section describes the <literal>InnoDB</literal>-related
-      command options and system variables. System variables that are
-      true or false can be enabled at server startup by naming them, or
-      disabled by using a <literal>skip-</literal> prefix. For example,
-      to enable or disable <literal>InnoDB</literal> checksums, you can
-      use <option>--innodb_checksums</option> or
-      <option>--skip-innodb_checksums</option> on the command line, or
-      <literal>innodb_checksums</literal> or
-      <literal>skip-innodb_checksums</literal> in an option file. System
-      variables that take a numeric value can be specified as
+      command options and system variables. System variables that take a
+      numeric value can be specified as
       <option>--<replaceable>var_name</replaceable>=<replaceable>value</replaceable></option>
       on the command line or as
       <literal><replaceable>var_name</replaceable>=<replaceable>value</replaceable></literal>
-      in option files. (Before MySQL 4.0.2, variables that are true or
-      false are enabled by naming them or disabled by not naming them,
-      and numeric-value variables should be specified using
+      in option files. Many of the system variables can be changed at
+      runtime (see xref linkend="dynamic-system-variables"/>). (Before
+      MySQL 4.0.2, system variable values should be specified using
       <option>--set-variable</option> syntax.) For more information on
       specifying options and system variables, see
       <xref linkend="program-options"/>.
@@ -1112,17 +1105,17 @@
 
         <para>
           The size of the buffer pool (in MB), if it is placed in the
-          AWE memory of 32-bit Windows. Available from MySQL 4.1.0 and
-          relevant only in 32-bit Windows. If your 32-bit Windows
-          operating system supports more than 4GB memory, so-called
-          <quote>Address Windowing Extensions,</quote> you can allocate
-          the <literal>InnoDB</literal> buffer pool into the AWE
-          physical memory using this parameter. The maximum possible
-          value for this is 64000. If this parameter is specified,
+          AWE memory. This is relevant only in 32-bit Windows. If your
+          32-bit Windows operating system supports more than 4GB memory,
+          so-called <quote>Address Windowing Extensions,</quote> you can
+          allocate the <literal>InnoDB</literal> buffer pool into the
+          AWE physical memory using this parameter. The maximum possible
+          value for this is 63000. If this parameter is specified,
           <literal>innodb_buffer_pool_size</literal> is the window in
           the 32-bit address space of <command>mysqld</command> where
           <literal>InnoDB</literal> maps that AWE memory. A good value
-          for <literal>innodb_buffer_pool_size</literal> is 500MB.
+          for <literal>innodb_buffer_pool_size</literal> is 500MB. This
+          variable is available as of MySQL 4.1.0.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -1145,16 +1138,12 @@
           is needed to access data in tables. On a dedicated database
           server, you may set this to up to 80% of the machine physical
           memory size. However, do not set it too large because
-          competition for the physical memory might cause paging in the
+          competition for physical memory might cause paging in the
           operating system.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
       <listitem>
-        <remark role="todo">
-          Document innodb_concurrency_tickets.
-        </remark>
-
         <para>
           <literal>innodb_data_file_path</literal>
         </para>
@@ -1672,10 +1661,6 @@
       </listitem>
 
       <listitem>
-        <remark role="todo">
-          document innodb_thread_sleep_delay
-        </remark>
-
         <para>
           <literal>sync_binlog</literal>
         </para>

Modified: trunk/refman-5.0/innodb.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.0/innodb.xml	2006-01-10 17:57:09 UTC (rev 753)
+++ trunk/refman-5.0/innodb.xml	2006-01-10 18:02:24 UTC (rev 754)
@@ -911,7 +911,9 @@
       on the command line or as
       <literal><replaceable>var_name</replaceable>=<replaceable>value</replaceable></literal>
       in option files. For more information on specifying options and
-      system variables, see <xref linkend="program-options"/>.
+      system variables, see <xref linkend="program-options"/>. Many of
+      the system variables can be changed at runtime (see xref
+      linkend="dynamic-system-variables"/>).
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -966,9 +968,9 @@
           data structures. The more tables you have in your application,
           the more memory you need to allocate here. If
           <literal>InnoDB</literal> runs out of memory in this pool, it
-          starts to allocate memory from the operating system, and
-          writes warning messages to the MySQL error log. The default
-          value is 1MB.
+          starts to allocate memory from the operating system and writes
+          warning messages to the MySQL error log. The default value is
+          1MB.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -980,8 +982,7 @@
         <para>
           The increment size (in MB) for extending the size of an
           auto-extending tablespace when it becomes full. The default
-          value is 8. This option can be changed at runtime as a global
-          system variable.
+          value is 8.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -992,17 +993,17 @@
 
         <para>
           The size of the buffer pool (in MB), if it is placed in the
-          AWE memory of 32-bit Windows. (Relevant only in 32-bit
-          Windows.) If your 32-bit Windows operating system supports
-          more than 4GB memory, using so-called <quote>Address Windowing
-          Extensions</quote>, you can allocate the
-          <literal>InnoDB</literal> buffer pool into the AWE physical
-          memory using this parameter. The maximum possible value for
-          this is 64000. If this parameter is specified,
-          <literal>innodb_buffer_pool_size</literal> is the window in
-          the 32-bit address space of <command>mysqld</command> where
-          <literal>InnoDB</literal> maps that AWE memory. A good value
-          for <literal>innodb_buffer_pool_size</literal> is 500MB.
+          AWE memory. This is relevant only in 32-bit Windows. If your
+          32-bit Windows operating system supports more than 4GB memory,
+          using so-called <quote>Address Windowing Extensions</quote>,
+          you can allocate the <literal>InnoDB</literal> buffer pool
+          into the AWE physical memory using this parameter. The maximum
+          possible value for this is 63000. If this parameter is
+          specified, <literal>innodb_buffer_pool_size</literal> is the
+          window in the 32-bit address space of
+          <command>mysqld</command> where <literal>InnoDB</literal> maps
+          that AWE memory. A good value for
+          <literal>innodb_buffer_pool_size</literal> is 500MB.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -1025,7 +1026,7 @@
           is needed to access data in tables. On a dedicated database
           server, you may set this to up to 80% of the machine physical
           memory size. However, do not set it too large because
-          competition for the physical memory might cause paging in the
+          competition for physical memory might cause paging in the
           operating system.
         </para>
       </listitem>
@@ -1036,13 +1037,13 @@
         </para>
 
         <para>
-          <literal>InnoDB</literal> uses checksum validation on all
+          <literal>InnoDB</literal> can use checksum validation on all
           pages read from the disk to ensure extra fault tolerance
-          against broken hardware or data files. However, under some
-          rare circumstances (such as when running benchmarks) this
-          extra safety feature is unneeded. In such cases, this option
-          (which is enabled by default) can be turned off with
-          <option>--skip-innodb-checksums</option>. This option was
+          against broken hardware or data files. This validation is
+          enabled by default. However, under some rare circumstances
+          (such as when running benchmarks) this extra safety feature is
+          unneeded and can be disabled with
+          <option>--skip-innodb_checksums</option>. This variable was
           added in MySQL 5.0.3.
         </para>
       </listitem>
@@ -1090,19 +1091,19 @@
 
         <para>
           The paths to individual data files and their sizes. The full
-          directory path to each data file is acquired by concatenating
+          directory path to each data file is formed by concatenating
           <literal>innodb_data_home_dir</literal> to each path specified
           here. The file sizes are specified in MB or GB (1024MB) by
           appending <literal>M</literal> or <literal>G</literal> to the
           size value. The sum of the sizes of the files must be at least
-          10MB. On some operating systems, files must be less than 2GB.
-          If you do not specify
+          10MB. If you do not specify
           <literal>innodb_data_file_path</literal>, the default behavior
-          starting is to create a single 10MB auto-extending data file
-          named <filename>ibdata1</filename>. You can set the file size
-          to more than 4GB on those operating systems supporting big
-          files. You can also use raw disk partitions as data files. See
-          <xref linkend="innodb-raw-devices"/>.
+          is to create a single 10MB auto-extending data file named
+          <filename>ibdata1</filename>. The size limit of individual
+          files is determined by your operating system. You can set the
+          file size to more than 4GB on those operating systems that
+          support big files. You can also use raw disk partitions as
+          data files. See <xref linkend="innodb-raw-devices"/>.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -1115,7 +1116,7 @@
           The common part of the directory path for all
           <literal>InnoDB</literal> data files. If you do not set this
           value, the default is the MySQL data directory. You can
-          specify this also as an empty string, in which case you can
+          specify the value as an empty string, in which case you can
           use absolute file paths in
           <literal>innodb_data_file_path</literal>.
         </para>
@@ -1129,13 +1130,11 @@
         <para>
           By default, <literal>InnoDB</literal> stores all data twice,
           first to the doublewrite buffer, and then to the actual data
-          files. This option can be used to disable this functionality.
-          Like <literal>innodb_checksums</literal>, this option is
-          enabled by default; it can be turned off with
-          <option>--skip-innodb-doublewrite</option> for benchmarks or
-          cases when top performance is needed rather than concern for
-          data integrity or possible failures. This option was added in
-          MySQL 5.0.3.
+          files. This variable is enabled by default. It can be turned
+          off with <option>--skip-innodb_doublewrite</option> for
+          benchmarks or cases when top performance is needed rather than
+          concern for data integrity or possible failures. This variable
+          was added in MySQL 5.0.3.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -1145,16 +1144,17 @@
         </para>
 
         <para>
-          If you set this to 0, <literal>InnoDB</literal> does a full
-          purge and an insert buffer merge before a shutdown. These
-          operations can take minutes, or even hours in extreme cases.
-          If you set this parameter to 1, <literal>InnoDB</literal>
-          skips these operations at shutdown. The default value is 1. If
-          you set it to 2 (available starting from MySQL 5.0.5, except
-          on Netware), <literal>InnoDB</literal> will just flush its
-          logs and then shut down cold, as if MySQL had crashed; no
-          committed transaction will be lost, but a crash recovery will
-          be done at next startup.
+          If you set this variable to 0, <literal>InnoDB</literal> does
+          a full purge and an insert buffer merge before a shutdown.
+          These operations can take minutes, or even hours in extreme
+          cases. If you set this variable to 1,
+          <literal>InnoDB</literal> skips these operations at shutdown.
+          The default value is 1. If you set it to 2,
+          <literal>InnoDB</literal> will just flush its logs and then
+          shut down cold, as if MySQL had crashed; no committed
+          transaction will be lost, but crash recovery will be done at
+          the next startup. The value of 2 can be used as of MySQL
+          5.0.5, except that it cannot be used on NetWare.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -1350,7 +1350,7 @@
         </para>
 
         <para>
-          Starting from MySQL 5.0.2 this option is even more unsafe.
+          Starting from MySQL 5.0.2, this option is even more unsafe.
           <literal>InnoDB</literal> in an <literal>UPDATE</literal> or a
           <literal>DELETE</literal> only locks rows that it updates or
           deletes. This greatly reduces the probability of deadlocks but
@@ -1708,6 +1708,26 @@
       </listitem>
 -->
 
+      <listitem>
+        <para>
+          <literal>sync_binlog</literal>
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          If positive, the MySQL server synchronizes its binary log to
+          disk (<literal>fdatasync()</literal>) after every
+          <literal>sync_binlog</literal>'th write to this binary log.
+          Note that there is one write to the binary log per statement
+          if in autocommit mode, and otherwise one write per
+          transaction. The default value is 0 which does no
+          synchronizing to disk. A value of 1 is the safest choice,
+          because in the event of a crash you lose at most one
+          statement/transaction from the binary log; however, it is also
+          the slowest choice (unless the disk has a battery-backed
+          cache, which makes synchronization very fast).
+        </para>
+      </listitem>
+
     </itemizedlist>
 
   </section>

Modified: trunk/refman-5.1/innodb.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.1/innodb.xml	2006-01-10 17:57:09 UTC (rev 753)
+++ trunk/refman-5.1/innodb.xml	2006-01-10 18:02:24 UTC (rev 754)
@@ -911,7 +911,9 @@
       on the command line or as
       <literal><replaceable>var_name</replaceable>=<replaceable>value</replaceable></literal>
       in option files. For more information on specifying options and
-      system variables, see <xref linkend="program-options"/>.
+      system variables, see <xref linkend="program-options"/>. Many of
+      the system variables can be changed at runtime (see xref
+      linkend="dynamic-system-variables"/>).
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -966,9 +968,9 @@
           data structures. The more tables you have in your application,
           the more memory you need to allocate here. If
           <literal>InnoDB</literal> runs out of memory in this pool, it
-          starts to allocate memory from the operating system, and
-          writes warning messages to the MySQL error log. The default
-          value is 1MB.
+          starts to allocate memory from the operating system and writes
+          warning messages to the MySQL error log. The default value is
+          1MB.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -980,8 +982,7 @@
         <para>
           The increment size (in MB) for extending the size of an
           auto-extending tablespace when it becomes full. The default
-          value is 8. This option can be changed at runtime as a global
-          system variable.
+          value is 8.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -992,17 +993,17 @@
 
         <para>
           The size of the buffer pool (in MB), if it is placed in the
-          AWE memory of 32-bit Windows. (Relevant only in 32-bit
-          Windows.) If your 32-bit Windows operating system supports
-          more than 4GB memory, using so-called <quote>Address Windowing
-          Extensions</quote>, you can allocate the
-          <literal>InnoDB</literal> buffer pool into the AWE physical
-          memory using this parameter. The maximum possible value for
-          this is 64000. If this parameter is specified,
-          <literal>innodb_buffer_pool_size</literal> is the window in
-          the 32-bit address space of <command>mysqld</command> where
-          <literal>InnoDB</literal> maps that AWE memory. A good value
-          for <literal>innodb_buffer_pool_size</literal> is 500MB.
+          AWE memory. This is relevant only in 32-bit Windows. If your
+          32-bit Windows operating system supports more than 4GB memory,
+          using so-called <quote>Address Windowing Extensions</quote>,
+          you can allocate the <literal>InnoDB</literal> buffer pool
+          into the AWE physical memory using this parameter. The maximum
+          possible value for this is 63000. If this parameter is
+          specified, <literal>innodb_buffer_pool_size</literal> is the
+          window in the 32-bit address space of
+          <command>mysqld</command> where <literal>InnoDB</literal> maps
+          that AWE memory. A good value for
+          <literal>innodb_buffer_pool_size</literal> is 500MB.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -1026,7 +1027,7 @@
           is needed to access data in tables. On a dedicated database
           server, you may set this to up to 80% of the machine physical
           memory size. However, do not set it too large because
-          competition for the physical memory might cause paging in the
+          competition for physical memory might cause paging in the
           operating system.
         </para>
       </listitem>
@@ -1037,12 +1038,12 @@
         </para>
 
         <para>
-          <literal>InnoDB</literal> uses checksum validation on all
+          <literal>InnoDB</literal> can use checksum validation on all
           pages read from the disk to ensure extra fault tolerance
-          against broken hardware or data files. However, under some
-          rare circumstances (such as when running benchmarks) this
-          extra safety feature is unneeded. In such cases, this option
-          (which is enabled by default) can be turned off with
+          against broken hardware or data files. This validation is
+          enabled by default. However, under some rare circumstances
+          (such as when running benchmarks) this extra safety feature is
+          unneeded and can be disabled with
           <option>--skip-innodb-checksums</option>.
         </para>
       </listitem>
@@ -1088,19 +1089,19 @@
 
         <para>
           The paths to individual data files and their sizes. The full
-          directory path to each data file is acquired by concatenating
+          directory path to each data file is formed by concatenating
           <literal>innodb_data_home_dir</literal> to each path specified
           here. The file sizes are specified in MB or GB (1024MB) by
           appending <literal>M</literal> or <literal>G</literal> to the
           size value. The sum of the sizes of the files must be at least
-          10MB. On some operating systems, files must be less than 2GB.
-          If you do not specify
+          10MB. If you do not specify
           <literal>innodb_data_file_path</literal>, the default behavior
-          starting is to create a single 10MB auto-extending data file
-          named <filename>ibdata1</filename>. You can set the file size
-          to more than 4GB on those operating systems supporting big
-          files. You can also use raw disk partitions as data files. See
-          <xref linkend="innodb-raw-devices"/>.
+          is to create a single 10MB auto-extending data file named
+          <filename>ibdata1</filename>. The size limit of individual
+          files is determined by your operating system. You can set the
+          file size to more than 4GB on those operating systems that
+          support big files. You can also use raw disk partitions as
+          data files. See <xref linkend="innodb-raw-devices"/>.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -1113,7 +1114,7 @@
           The common part of the directory path for all
           <literal>InnoDB</literal> data files. If you do not set this
           value, the default is the MySQL data directory. You can
-          specify this also as an empty string, in which case you can
+          specify the value as an empty string, in which case you can
           use absolute file paths in
           <literal>innodb_data_file_path</literal>.
         </para>
@@ -1127,12 +1128,10 @@
         <para>
           By default, <literal>InnoDB</literal> stores all data twice,
           first to the doublewrite buffer, and then to the actual data
-          files. This option can be used to disable this functionality.
-          Like <literal>innodb_checksums</literal>, this option is
-          enabled by default; it can be turned off with
-          <option>--skip-innodb-doublewrite</option> for benchmarks or
-          cases when top performance is needed rather than concern for
-          data integrity or possible failures.
+          files. This variable is enabled by default. It can be turned
+          off with <option>--skip-innodb_doublewrite</option> for
+          benchmarks or cases when top performance is needed rather than
+          concern for data integrity or possible failures.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -1142,16 +1141,16 @@
         </para>
 
         <para>
-          If you set this to 0, <literal>InnoDB</literal> does a full
-          purge and an insert buffer merge before a shutdown. These
-          operations can take minutes, or even hours in extreme cases.
-          If you set this parameter to 1, <literal>InnoDB</literal>
-          skips these operations at shutdown. The default value is 1. If
-          you set it to 2 (not available on Netware),
+          If you set this variable to 0, <literal>InnoDB</literal> does
+          a full purge and an insert buffer merge before a shutdown.
+          These operations can take minutes, or even hours in extreme
+          cases. If you set this variable to 1,
+          <literal>InnoDB</literal> skips these operations at shutdown.
+          The default value is 1. If you set it to 2,
           <literal>InnoDB</literal> will just flush its logs and then
           shut down cold, as if MySQL had crashed; no committed
-          transaction will be lost, but a crash recovery will be done at
-          next startup.
+          transaction will be lost, but crash recovery will be done at
+          the next startup. A value of 2 cannot be used on NetWare.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -1685,6 +1684,26 @@
         </listitem>
       -->
 
+      <listitem>
+        <para>
+          <literal>sync_binlog</literal>
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          If positive, the MySQL server synchronizes its binary log to
+          disk (<literal>fdatasync()</literal>) after every
+          <literal>sync_binlog</literal>'th write to this binary log.
+          Note that there is one write to the binary log per statement
+          if in autocommit mode, and otherwise one write per
+          transaction. The default value is 0 which does no
+          synchronizing to disk. A value of 1 is the safest choice,
+          because in the event of a crash you lose at most one
+          statement/transaction from the binary log; however, it is also
+          the slowest choice (unless the disk has a battery-backed
+          cache, which makes synchronization very fast).
+        </para>
+      </listitem>
+
     </itemizedlist>
 
   </section>

Thread
svn commit - mysqldoc@docsrva: r754 - in trunk: . refman-4.1 refman-5.0 refman-5.1paul10 Jan