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From:paul Date:January 9 2006 8:43pm
Subject:svn commit - mysqldoc@docsrva: r746 - in trunk: . refman-4.1 refman-5.0 refman-5.1 refman-common
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Author: paul
Date: 2006-01-09 21:43:55 +0100 (Mon, 09 Jan 2006)
New Revision: 746

Log:
 r6007@frost:  paul | 2006-01-09 14:42:03 -0600
 General revisions.


Modified:
   trunk/
   trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml
   trunk/refman-4.1/innodb.xml
   trunk/refman-4.1/renamed-nodes.txt
   trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml
   trunk/refman-5.0/innodb.xml
   trunk/refman-5.0/renamed-nodes.txt
   trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml
   trunk/refman-5.1/innodb.xml
   trunk/refman-5.1/renamed-nodes.txt
   trunk/refman-common/news-3.23.xml
   trunk/refman-common/news-4.0.xml
   trunk/refman-common/titles.en.ent


Property changes on: trunk
___________________________________________________________________
Name: svk:merge
   - b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:6006
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:1994
   + b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:6007
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:1994

Modified: trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:05 UTC (rev 745)
+++ trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:55 UTC (rev 746)
@@ -2072,8 +2072,8 @@
             <para>
               Options specific to particular storage engines: See
               <xref linkend="myisam-start"/>,
-              <xref linkend="bdb-start"/>,
-              <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>.
+              <xref linkend="bdb-start"/>, and
+              <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -4429,7 +4429,7 @@
           Most system variables are described here. Variables with no
           version indicated have been present since at least MySQL 3.22.
           <literal>InnoDB</literal> system variables are listed at
-          <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>.
+          <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -5495,7 +5495,7 @@
 
             <para>
               The <literal>InnoDB</literal> system variables are listed
-              in <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>.
+              in <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 

Modified: trunk/refman-4.1/innodb.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-4.1/innodb.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:05 UTC (rev 745)
+++ trunk/refman-4.1/innodb.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:55 UTC (rev 746)
@@ -55,16 +55,15 @@
 
     <para>
       <literal>InnoDB</literal> provides MySQL with a transaction-safe
-      (<literal>ACID</literal> compliant) storage engine with commit,
-      rollback, and crash recovery capabilities.
+      (<literal>ACID</literal> compliant) storage engine that has
+      commit, rollback, and crash recovery capabilities.
       <literal>InnoDB</literal> does locking on the row level and also
       provides an Oracle-style consistent non-locking read in
       <literal>SELECT</literal> statements. These features increase
       multi-user concurrency and performance. There is no need for lock
-      escalation in <literal>InnoDB</literal> because row-level locks in
-      <literal>InnoDB</literal> fit in very little space.
-      <literal>InnoDB</literal> also supports <literal>FOREIGN
-      KEY</literal> constraints. You can freely mix
+      escalation in <literal>InnoDB</literal> because row-level locks
+      fit in very little space. <literal>InnoDB</literal> also supports
+      <literal>FOREIGN KEY</literal> constraints. You can freely mix
       <literal>InnoDB</literal> tables with tables from other MySQL
       storage engines, even within the same statement.
     </para>
@@ -114,8 +113,8 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      For the <literal>InnoDB</literal> storage engine, there's a
-      dedicated forum available on
+      A forum dedicated to the <literal>InnoDB</literal> storage engine
+      is available at
       <ulink url="http://forums.mysql.com/list.php?22"/>.
     </para>
 
@@ -237,60 +236,64 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      Two important disk-based resources managed by the
-      <literal>InnoDB</literal> storage engine are its tablespace data
-      files and its log files.
-    </para>
-
-    <para>
-      If you specify no <literal>InnoDB</literal> configuration options,
-      MySQL 4.0 and above create an auto-extending 10MB data file named
-      <filename>ibdata1</filename> and two 5MB log files named
-      <filename>ib_logfile0</filename> and
-      <filename>ib_logfile1</filename> in the MySQL data directory. (In
-      MySQL 4.0.0 and 4.0.1, the data file is 64MB and not
-      auto-extending.) In MySQL 3.23, <literal>InnoDB</literal> does not
-      start if you provide no configuration options.
-    </para>
-
-    <para>
       <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: <literal>InnoDB</literal>
       provides MySQL with a transaction-safe (<literal>ACID</literal>
-      compliant) storage engine with commit, rollback, and crash
-      recovery capabilities. <emphasis role="bold">It cannot do
-      so</emphasis> if the underlying operating system and hardware does
+      compliant) storage engine that has commit, rollback, and crash
+      recovery capabilities. <emphasis role="bold">However, it cannot do
+      so</emphasis> if the underlying operating system or hardware does
       not work as advertised. Many operating systems or disk subsystems
       may delay or reorder write operations in order to improve
-      performance. On some operating systems, the very system call
-      (<literal>fsync()</literal>) that should wait until all unwritten
-      data for a file has been flushed may actually return before the
-      data has been flushed to stable storage. Because of this, an
-      operating system crash or a power outage may destroy recently
-      committed data, or in the worst case, even corrupt the database
-      because of write operations having been reordered. If data
-      integrity is important to you, you should perform some
+      performance. On some operating systems, the very system call that
+      should wait until all unwritten data for a file has been flushed
+      &mdash; <literal>fsync()</literal> &mdash; might actually return
+      before the data has been flushed to stable storage. Because of
+      this, an operating system crash or a power outage may destroy
+      recently committed data, or in the worst case, even corrupt the
+      database because of write operations having been reordered. If
+      data integrity is important to you, you should perform some
       <quote>pull-the-plug</quote> tests before using anything in
-      production. On Mac OS X 10.3 and later, <literal>InnoDB</literal>
+      production. On Mac OS X 10.3 and up, <literal>InnoDB</literal>
       uses a special <literal>fcntl()</literal> file flush method. Under
       Linux, it is advisable to <emphasis role="bold">disable the
       write-back cache</emphasis>.
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      On ATAPI hard disks, a command like <literal>hdparm -W0
-      /dev/<replaceable>hda</replaceable></literal> may work.
+      On ATAPI hard disks, a command such <literal>hdparm -W0
+      /dev/hda</literal> may work to disable the write-back cache.
       <emphasis role="bold">Beware that some drives or disk controllers
       may be unable to disable the write-back cache.</emphasis>
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: To get good performance,
-      you should explicitly provide <literal>InnoDB</literal> parameters
-      as discussed in the following examples. Naturally, you should edit
-      the settings to suit your hardware and requirements.
+      Two important disk-based resources managed by the
+      <literal>InnoDB</literal> storage engine are its tablespace data
+      files and its log files.
     </para>
 
     <para>
+      <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: If you specify no
+      <literal>InnoDB</literal> configuration options, MySQL 4.0 and
+      above create an auto-extending 10MB data file named
+      <filename>ibdata1</filename> and two 5MB log files named
+      <filename>ib_logfile0</filename> and
+      <filename>ib_logfile1</filename> in the MySQL data directory. (In
+      MySQL 4.0.0 and 4.0.1, the data file is 64MB and not
+      auto-extending.) In MySQL 3.23, <literal>InnoDB</literal> does not
+      start if you provide no configuration options. To get good
+      performance, you should explicitly provide
+      <literal>InnoDB</literal> parameters as discussed in the following
+      examples. Naturally, you should edit the settings to suit your
+      hardware and requirements.
+    </para>
+
+    <para>
+      The examples shown here are representative. See
+      <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/> for additional information
+      about <literal>InnoDB</literal>-related configuration parameters.
+    </para>
+
+    <para>
       To set up the <literal>InnoDB</literal> tablespace files, use the
       <literal>innodb_data_file_path</literal> option in the
       <literal>[mysqld]</literal> section of the
@@ -319,7 +322,8 @@
     <para>
       This setting configures a single 10MB data file named
       <filename>ibdata1</filename> that is auto-extending. No location
-      for the file is given, so the default is the MySQL data directory.
+      for the file is given, so by default, <literal>InnoDB</literal>
+      creates it in the MySQL data directory.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -360,7 +364,8 @@
       If you specify the <literal>autoextend</literal> option for the
       last data file, <literal>InnoDB</literal> extends the data file if
       it runs out of free space in the tablespace. The increment is 8MB
-      at a time.
+      at a time by default. It can be modified by changing the
+      <literal>innodb_autoextend_increment</literal> system variable.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -370,12 +375,12 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      <literal>InnoDB</literal> is not aware of the maximum file size,
-      so be cautious on filesystems where the maximum file size is 2GB.
-      To specify a maximum size for an auto-extending data file, use the
-      <literal>max</literal> attribute. The following configuration
-      allows <filename>ibdata1</filename> to grow up to a limit of
-      500MB:
+      <literal>InnoDB</literal> is not aware of the filesystem maximum
+      file size, so be cautious on filesystems where the maximum file
+      size is a small value such as 2GB. To specify a maximum size for
+      an auto-extending data file, use the <literal>max</literal>
+      attribute. The following configuration allows
+      <filename>ibdata1</filename> to grow up to a limit of 500MB:
     </para>
 
 <programlisting>
@@ -412,11 +417,13 @@
       <literal>InnoDB</literal> forms the directory path for each data
       file by textually concatenating the value of
       <literal>innodb_data_home_dir</literal> to the data file name,
-      adding a slash or backslash between if needed. If the
-      <literal>innodb_data_home_dir</literal> option is not mentioned in
-      <filename>my.cnf</filename> at all, the default value is the
-      <quote>dot</quote> directory <filename>./</filename>, which means
-      the MySQL data directory.
+      adding a pathname separator (slash or backslash) between values if
+      necessary. If the <literal>innodb_data_home_dir</literal> option
+      is not mentioned in <filename>my.cnf</filename> at all, the
+      default value is the <quote>dot</quote> directory
+      <filename>./</filename>, which means the MySQL data directory.
+      (The MySQL server changes its current working directory to its
+      data directory when it begins executing.)
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -440,15 +447,12 @@
       <filename>my.ini</filename> for <literal>InnoDB</literal>. The
       example assumes the use of MySQL-Max 3.23.50 or later or MySQL
       4.0.2 or later because it uses the <literal>autoextend</literal>
-      attribute.
-    </para>
-
-    <para>
-      This example suits most users, both on Unix and Windows, who do
-      not want to distribute <literal>InnoDB</literal> data files and
-      log files on several disks. It creates an auto-extending data file
-      <filename>ibdata1</filename> and two <literal>InnoDB</literal> log
-      files <filename>ib_logfile0</filename> and
+      attribute. The example suits most users, both on Unix and Windows,
+      who do not want to distribute <literal>InnoDB</literal> data files
+      and log files onto several disks. It creates an auto-extending
+      data file <filename>ibdata1</filename> and two
+      <literal>InnoDB</literal> log files
+      <filename>ib_logfile0</filename> and
       <filename>ib_logfile1</filename> in the MySQL data directory.
       Also, the small archived <literal>InnoDB</literal> log file
       <filename>ib_arch_log_0000000000</filename> that
@@ -494,12 +498,13 @@
       command prompt. <literal>InnoDB</literal> then prints the
       information about the database creation to the screen, so you can
       see what is happening. For example, on Windows, if
-      <command>mysqld-max</command> is located in
-      <filename>C:\mysql\bin</filename>, you can start it like this:
+      <command>mysqld-max</command> is located in <filename>C:\Program
+      Files\MySQL\MySQL Server &current-series;\bin</filename>, you can
+      start it like this:
     </para>
 
 <programlisting>
-C:\&gt; <userinput>C:\mysql\bin\mysqld-max --console</userinput>
+C:\&gt; <userinput>C:\Program Files\MySQL\MySQL Server &current-series;\bin\mysqld-max --console</userinput>
 </programlisting>
 
     <para>
@@ -514,127 +519,37 @@
       like.
     </para>
 
-    <remark role="todo">
-      Do we really need this info here, since it just repeats what's
-      found in the Installation and other chapters? /JS
-    </remark>
+    <para>
+      You can place <literal>InnoDB</literal> options in the
+      <literal>[mysqld]</literal> group of any option file that your
+      server reads when it starts. The locations for option files are
+      described in <xref linkend="option-files"/>.
+    </para>
 
     <para>
-      <emphasis role="bold">Where to specify options on
-      Windows?</emphasis> The rules for option files on Windows are as
-      follows:
+      If you installed MySQL on Windows using the installation and
+      configuration wizards, the option file will be the
+      <filename>my.ini</filename> file located in your MySQL
+      installation directory. See
+      <xref linkend="mysql-config-wizard-file-location"/>.
     </para>
 
-    <itemizedlist>
+    <para>
+      If your PC uses a boot loader where the <filename>C:</filename>
+      drive is not the boot drive, your only option is to use the
+      <filename>my.ini</filename> file in your Windows directory
+      (typically <filename>C:\WINDOWS</filename> or
+      <filename>C:\WINNT</filename>). You can use the
+      <literal>SET</literal> command at the command prompt in a console
+      window to print the value of <literal>WINDIR</literal>:
+    </para>
 
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          Only one of <filename>my.cnf</filename> or
-          <filename>my.ini</filename> should be created.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          The <filename>my.cnf</filename> file should be placed in the
-          root directory of the <filename>C:</filename> drive.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          The <filename>my.ini</filename> file should be placed in the
-          <literal>WINDIR</literal> directory; for example,
-          <filename>C:\WINDOWS</filename> or
-          <filename>C:\WINNT</filename>. You can use the
-          <literal>SET</literal> command at the command prompt in a
-          console window to print the value of
-          <literal>WINDIR</literal>:
-        </para>
-
 <programlisting>
 C:\&gt; <userinput>SET WINDIR</userinput>
-windir=C:\WINNT
+windir=C:\WINDOWS
 </programlisting>
-      </listitem>
 
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          If your PC uses a boot loader where the
-          <filename>C:</filename> drive is not the boot drive, your only
-          option is to use the <filename>my.ini</filename> file.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          If you installed MySQL using the installation and
-          configuration wizards, the <filename>my.ini</filename> file is
-          located in your MySQL installation directory. See
-          <xref linkend="mysql-config-wizard-file-location"/>.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-    </itemizedlist>
-
     <para>
-      <emphasis role="bold">Where to specify options on Unix?</emphasis>
-      On Unix, <command>mysqld</command> reads options from the
-      following files, if they exist, in the following order:
-    </para>
-
-    <itemizedlist>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          <filename>/etc/my.cnf</filename>
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          Global options.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          <filename>$MYSQL_HOME/my.cnf</filename>
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          Server-specific options.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          <filename>defaults-extra-file</filename>
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          The file specified with the
-          <option>--defaults-extra-file</option> option.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          <filename>~/.my.cnf</filename>
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          User-specific options.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-    </itemizedlist>
-
-    <para>
-      <literal>MYSQL_HOME</literal> represents an environment variable,
-      which contains a path to the directory containing the
-      server-specific <literal>my.cnf</literal> file.
-    </para>
-
-    <para>
       If you want to make sure that <command>mysqld</command> reads
       options only from a specific file, you can use the
       <option>--defaults-option</option> as the first option on the
@@ -642,15 +557,15 @@
     </para>
 
 <programlisting>
-mysqld --defaults-file=your_path_to_my_cnf
+mysqld --defaults-file=<replaceable>your_path_to_my_cnf</replaceable>
 </programlisting>
 
     <para>
       <emphasis role="bold">An advanced <filename>my.cnf</filename>
       example.</emphasis> Suppose that you have a Linux computer with
-      2GB RAM and three 60GB hard disks (at directory paths
+      2GB RAM and three 60GB hard disks at directory paths
       <filename>/</filename>, <filename>/dr2</filename> and
-      <filename>/dr3</filename>). The following example shows possible
+      <filename>/dr3</filename>. The following example shows possible
       configuration parameters in <filename>my.cnf</filename> for
       <literal>InnoDB</literal>.
     </para>
@@ -687,14 +602,15 @@
 </programlisting>
 
     <para>
-      Note that the example places the two data files on different
-      disks. <literal>InnoDB</literal> fills the tablespace beginning
-      with the first data file. In some cases, it improves the
-      performance of the database if all data is not placed on the same
-      physical disk. Putting log files on a different disk from data is
-      very often beneficial for performance. You can also use raw disk
-      partitions (raw devices) as <literal>InnoDB</literal> data files,
-      which may speed up I/O. See <xref linkend="innodb-raw-devices"/>.
+      In some cases, database performance improves the if all data is
+      not placed on the same physical disk. Putting log files on a
+      different disk from data is very often beneficial for performance.
+      The example illustrates how to do this. It places the two data
+      files on different disks and places the log files on the third
+      disk. <literal>InnoDB</literal> fills the tablespace beginning
+      with the first data file. You can also use raw disk partitions
+      (raw devices) as <literal>InnoDB</literal> data files, which may
+      speed up I/O. See <xref linkend="innodb-raw-devices"/>.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -723,7 +639,7 @@
       In MySQL 4.1, by compiling MySQL yourself, you can use up to 64GB
       of physical memory in 32-bit Windows. See the description for
       <literal>innodb_buffer_pool_awe_mem_mb</literal> in
-      <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>.
+      <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -1090,9 +1006,9 @@
 
   </section>
 
-  <section id="innodb-start">
+  <section id="innodb-parameters">
 
-    <title>&title-innodb-start;</title>
+    <title>&title-innodb-parameters;</title>
 
     <remark role="todo">
       Have separate lists for options and variables?
@@ -2048,11 +1964,12 @@
       <title>&title-converting-tables-to-innodb;</title>
 
       <para>
-        Important: You should not convert MySQL system tables in the
+        Important: Do not convert MySQL system tables in the
         <literal>mysql</literal> database (such as
         <literal>user</literal> or <literal>host</literal>) to the
-        <literal>InnoDB</literal> type. The system tables must always be
-        of the <literal>MyISAM</literal> type.
+        <literal>InnoDB</literal> type. This is an unsupported
+        operation. The system tables must always be of the
+        <literal>MyISAM</literal> type.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -5433,7 +5350,7 @@
       for the purge thread. Starting with MySQL 4.0.22 and 4.1.6, there
       is a startup option and settable global variable
       <literal>innodb_max_purge_lag</literal> for exactly this purpose.
-      See <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>.
+      See <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>, for more information.
     </para>
 
   </section>

Modified: trunk/refman-4.1/renamed-nodes.txt
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-4.1/renamed-nodes.txt	2006-01-09 20:43:05 UTC (rev 745)
+++ trunk/refman-4.1/renamed-nodes.txt	2006-01-09 20:43:55 UTC (rev 746)
@@ -95,3 +95,4 @@
 localisation localization
 client-side-scripts client-utility-programs
 mysqlcc client-utility-programs
+innodb-start innodb-parameters

Modified: trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:05 UTC (rev 745)
+++ trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:55 UTC (rev 746)
@@ -2876,7 +2876,7 @@
               Options specific to particular storage engines: See
               <xref linkend="myisam-start"/>,
               <xref linkend="bdb-start"/>, and
-              <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>.
+              <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -5542,7 +5542,7 @@
           implementation, please see
           <citetitle>&title-refman-4-1;</citetitle>.
           <literal>InnoDB</literal> system variables are listed in
-          <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>.
+          <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -6913,7 +6913,7 @@
 
             <para>
               The <literal>InnoDB</literal> system variables are listed
-              in <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>.
+              in <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 

Modified: trunk/refman-5.0/innodb.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.0/innodb.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:05 UTC (rev 745)
+++ trunk/refman-5.0/innodb.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:55 UTC (rev 746)
@@ -55,16 +55,15 @@
 
     <para>
       <literal>InnoDB</literal> provides MySQL with a transaction-safe
-      (<literal>ACID</literal> compliant) storage engine with commit,
-      rollback, and crash recovery capabilities.
+      (<literal>ACID</literal> compliant) storage engine that has
+      commit, rollback, and crash recovery capabilities.
       <literal>InnoDB</literal> does locking on the row level and also
       provides an Oracle-style consistent non-locking read in
       <literal>SELECT</literal> statements. These features increase
       multi-user concurrency and performance. There is no need for lock
-      escalation in <literal>InnoDB</literal> because row-level locks in
-      <literal>InnoDB</literal> fit in very little space.
-      <literal>InnoDB</literal> also supports <literal>FOREIGN
-      KEY</literal> constraints. You can freely mix
+      escalation in <literal>InnoDB</literal> because row-level locks
+      fit in very little space. <literal>InnoDB</literal> also supports
+      <literal>FOREIGN KEY</literal> constraints. You can freely mix
       <literal>InnoDB</literal> tables with tables from other MySQL
       storage engines, even within the same statement.
     </para>
@@ -119,8 +118,8 @@
 
       <listitem>
         <para>
-          For the <literal>InnoDB</literal> storage engine, there's a
-          dedicated forum available on
+          A forum dedicated to the <literal>InnoDB</literal> storage
+          engine is available at
           <ulink url="http://forums.mysql.com/list.php?22"/>.
         </para>
       </listitem>
@@ -166,57 +165,60 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      Two important disk-based resources managed by the
-      <literal>InnoDB</literal> storage engine are its tablespace data
-      files and its log files.
-    </para>
-
-    <para>
-      If you specify no <literal>InnoDB</literal> configuration options,
-      MySQL creates an auto-extending 10MB data file named
-      <filename>ibdata1</filename> and two 5MB log files named
-      <filename>ib_logfile0</filename> and
-      <filename>ib_logfile1</filename> in the MySQL data directory.
-    </para>
-
-    <para>
       <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: <literal>InnoDB</literal>
       provides MySQL with a transaction-safe (<literal>ACID</literal>
-      compliant) storage engine with commit, rollback, and crash
-      recovery capabilities. <emphasis role="bold">It cannot do
-      so</emphasis> if the underlying operating system and hardware does
+      compliant) storage engine that has commit, rollback, and crash
+      recovery capabilities. <emphasis role="bold">However, it cannot do
+      so</emphasis> if the underlying operating system or hardware does
       not work as advertised. Many operating systems or disk subsystems
       may delay or reorder write operations in order to improve
-      performance. On some operating systems, the very system call
-      (<literal>fsync()</literal>) that should wait until all unwritten
-      data for a file has been flushed may actually return before the
-      data has been flushed to stable storage. Because of this, an
-      operating system crash or a power outage may destroy recently
-      committed data, or in the worst case, even corrupt the database
-      because of write operations having been reordered. If data
-      integrity is important to you, you should perform some
+      performance. On some operating systems, the very system call that
+      should wait until all unwritten data for a file has been flushed
+      &mdash; <literal>fsync()</literal> &mdash; might actually return
+      before the data has been flushed to stable storage. Because of
+      this, an operating system crash or a power outage may destroy
+      recently committed data, or in the worst case, even corrupt the
+      database because of write operations having been reordered. If
+      data integrity is important to you, you should perform some
       <quote>pull-the-plug</quote> tests before using anything in
-      production. On Mac OS X 10.3 and later, <literal>InnoDB</literal>
+      production. On Mac OS X 10.3 and up, <literal>InnoDB</literal>
       uses a special <literal>fcntl()</literal> file flush method. Under
       Linux, it is advisable to <emphasis role="bold">disable the
       write-back cache</emphasis>.
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      On ATAPI hard disks, a command like <literal>hdparm -W0
-      /dev/<replaceable>hda</replaceable></literal> may work.
+      On ATAPI hard disks, a command such <literal>hdparm -W0
+      /dev/hda</literal> may work to disable the write-back cache.
       <emphasis role="bold">Beware that some drives or disk controllers
       may be unable to disable the write-back cache.</emphasis>
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: To get good performance,
-      you should explicitly provide <literal>InnoDB</literal> parameters
-      as discussed in the following examples. Naturally, you should edit
-      the settings to suit your hardware and requirements.
+      Two important disk-based resources managed by the
+      <literal>InnoDB</literal> storage engine are its tablespace data
+      files and its log files.
     </para>
 
     <para>
+      <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: If you specify no
+      <literal>InnoDB</literal> configuration options, MySQL creates an
+      auto-extending 10MB data file named <filename>ibdata1</filename>
+      and two 5MB log files named <filename>ib_logfile0</filename> and
+      <filename>ib_logfile1</filename> in the MySQL data directory. To
+      get good performance, you should explicitly provide
+      <literal>InnoDB</literal> parameters as discussed in the following
+      examples. Naturally, you should edit the settings to suit your
+      hardware and requirements.
+    </para>
+
+    <para>
+      The examples shown here are representative. See
+      <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/> for additional information
+      about <literal>InnoDB</literal>-related configuration parameters.
+    </para>
+
+    <para>
       To set up the <literal>InnoDB</literal> tablespace files, use the
       <literal>innodb_data_file_path</literal> option in the
       <literal>[mysqld]</literal> section of the
@@ -245,7 +247,8 @@
     <para>
       This setting configures a single 10MB data file named
       <filename>ibdata1</filename> that is auto-extending. No location
-      for the file is given, so the default is the MySQL data directory.
+      for the file is given, so by default, <literal>InnoDB</literal>
+      creates it in the MySQL data directory.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -284,7 +287,8 @@
       If you specify the <literal>autoextend</literal> option for the
       last data file, <literal>InnoDB</literal> extends the data file if
       it runs out of free space in the tablespace. The increment is 8MB
-      at a time.
+      at a time by default. It can be modified by changing the
+      <literal>innodb_autoextend_increment</literal> system variable.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -294,12 +298,12 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      <literal>InnoDB</literal> is not aware of the maximum file size,
-      so be cautious on filesystems where the maximum file size is 2GB.
-      To specify a maximum size for an auto-extending data file, use the
-      <literal>max</literal> attribute. The following configuration
-      allows <filename>ibdata1</filename> to grow up to a limit of
-      500MB:
+      <literal>InnoDB</literal> is not aware of the filesystem maximum
+      file size, so be cautious on filesystems where the maximum file
+      size is a small value such as 2GB. To specify a maximum size for
+      an auto-extending data file, use the <literal>max</literal>
+      attribute. The following configuration allows
+      <filename>ibdata1</filename> to grow up to a limit of 500MB:
     </para>
 
 <programlisting>
@@ -336,11 +340,13 @@
       <literal>InnoDB</literal> forms the directory path for each data
       file by textually concatenating the value of
       <literal>innodb_data_home_dir</literal> to the data file name,
-      adding a slash or backslash between if needed. If the
-      <literal>innodb_data_home_dir</literal> option is not mentioned in
-      <filename>my.cnf</filename> at all, the default value is the
-      <quote>dot</quote> directory <filename>./</filename>, which means
-      the MySQL data directory.
+      adding a pathname separator (slash or backslash) between values if
+      necessary. If the <literal>innodb_data_home_dir</literal> option
+      is not mentioned in <filename>my.cnf</filename> at all, the
+      default value is the <quote>dot</quote> directory
+      <filename>./</filename>, which means the MySQL data directory.
+      (The MySQL server changes its current working directory to its
+      data directory when it begins executing.)
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -362,13 +368,10 @@
       RAM and one hard disk. The following example shows possible
       configuration parameters in <filename>my.cnf</filename> or
       <filename>my.ini</filename> for <literal>InnoDB</literal>,
-      including the <literal>autoextend</literal> attribute.
-    </para>
-
-    <para>
-      This example suits most users, both on Unix and Windows, who do
-      not want to distribute <literal>InnoDB</literal> data files and
-      log files on several disks. It creates an auto-extending data file
+      including the <literal>autoextend</literal> attribute. The example
+      suits most users, both on Unix and Windows, who do not want to
+      distribute <literal>InnoDB</literal> data files and log files onto
+      several disks. It creates an auto-extending data file
       <filename>ibdata1</filename> and two <literal>InnoDB</literal> log
       files <filename>ib_logfile0</filename> and
       <filename>ib_logfile1</filename> in the MySQL data directory.
@@ -416,12 +419,13 @@
       command prompt. <literal>InnoDB</literal> then prints the
       information about the database creation to the screen, so you can
       see what is happening. For example, on Windows, if
-      <command>mysqld-max</command> is located in
-      <filename>C:\mysql\bin</filename>, you can start it like this:
+      <command>mysqld-max</command> is located in <filename>C:\Program
+      Files\MySQL\MySQL Server &current-series;\bin</filename>, you can
+      start it like this:
     </para>
 
 <programlisting>
-C:\&gt; <userinput>C:\mysql\bin\mysqld-max --console</userinput>
+C:\&gt; <userinput>C:\Program Files\MySQL\MySQL Server &current-series;\bin\mysqld-max --console</userinput>
 </programlisting>
 
     <para>
@@ -436,127 +440,37 @@
       like.
     </para>
 
-    <remark role="todo">
-      Do we really need this info here, since it just repeats what's
-      found in the Installation and other chapters? /JS
-    </remark>
+    <para>
+      You can place <literal>InnoDB</literal> options in the
+      <literal>[mysqld]</literal> group of any option file that your
+      server reads when it starts. The locations for option files are
+      described in <xref linkend="option-files"/>.
+    </para>
 
     <para>
-      <emphasis role="bold">Where to specify options on
-      Windows?</emphasis> The rules for option files on Windows are as
-      follows:
+      If you installed MySQL on Windows using the installation and
+      configuration wizards, the option file will be the
+      <filename>my.ini</filename> file located in your MySQL
+      installation directory. See
+      <xref linkend="mysql-config-wizard-file-location"/>.
     </para>
 
-    <itemizedlist>
+    <para>
+      If your PC uses a boot loader where the <filename>C:</filename>
+      drive is not the boot drive, your only option is to use the
+      <filename>my.ini</filename> file in your Windows directory
+      (typically <filename>C:\WINDOWS</filename> or
+      <filename>C:\WINNT</filename>). You can use the
+      <literal>SET</literal> command at the command prompt in a console
+      window to print the value of <literal>WINDIR</literal>:
+    </para>
 
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          Only one of <filename>my.cnf</filename> or
-          <filename>my.ini</filename> should be created.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          The <filename>my.cnf</filename> file should be placed in the
-          root directory of the <filename>C:</filename> drive.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          The <filename>my.ini</filename> file should be placed in the
-          <literal>WINDIR</literal> directory; for example,
-          <filename>C:\WINDOWS</filename> or
-          <filename>C:\WINNT</filename>. You can use the
-          <literal>SET</literal> command at the command prompt in a
-          console window to print the value of
-          <literal>WINDIR</literal>:
-        </para>
-
 <programlisting>
 C:\&gt; <userinput>SET WINDIR</userinput>
-windir=C:\WINNT
+windir=C:\WINDOWS
 </programlisting>
-      </listitem>
 
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          If your PC uses a boot loader where the
-          <filename>C:</filename> drive is not the boot drive, your only
-          option is to use the <filename>my.ini</filename> file.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          If you installed MySQL using the installation and
-          configuration wizards, the <filename>my.ini</filename> file is
-          located in your MySQL installation directory. See
-          <xref linkend="mysql-config-wizard-file-location"/>.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-    </itemizedlist>
-
     <para>
-      <emphasis role="bold">Where to specify options on Unix?</emphasis>
-      On Unix, <command>mysqld</command> reads options from the
-      following files, if they exist, in the following order:
-    </para>
-
-    <itemizedlist>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          <filename>/etc/my.cnf</filename>
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          Global options.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          <filename>$MYSQL_HOME/my.cnf</filename>
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          Server-specific options.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          <filename>defaults-extra-file</filename>
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          The file specified with the
-          <option>--defaults-extra-file</option> option.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          <filename>~/.my.cnf</filename>
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          User-specific options.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-    </itemizedlist>
-
-    <para>
-      <literal>MYSQL_HOME</literal> represents an environment variable,
-      which contains a path to the directory containing the
-      server-specific <literal>my.cnf</literal> file.
-    </para>
-
-    <para>
       If you want to make sure that <command>mysqld</command> reads
       options only from a specific file, you can use the
       <option>--defaults-option</option> as the first option on the
@@ -564,15 +478,15 @@
     </para>
 
 <programlisting>
-mysqld --defaults-file=your_path_to_my_cnf
+mysqld --defaults-file=<replaceable>your_path_to_my_cnf</replaceable>
 </programlisting>
 
     <para>
       <emphasis role="bold">An advanced <filename>my.cnf</filename>
       example.</emphasis> Suppose that you have a Linux computer with
-      2GB RAM and three 60GB hard disks (at directory paths
+      2GB RAM and three 60GB hard disks at directory paths
       <filename>/</filename>, <filename>/dr2</filename> and
-      <filename>/dr3</filename>). The following example shows possible
+      <filename>/dr3</filename>. The following example shows possible
       configuration parameters in <filename>my.cnf</filename> for
       <literal>InnoDB</literal>.
     </para>
@@ -606,14 +520,15 @@
 </programlisting>
 
     <para>
-      Note that the example places the two data files on different
-      disks. <literal>InnoDB</literal> fills the tablespace beginning
-      with the first data file. In some cases, it improves the
-      performance of the database if all data is not placed on the same
-      physical disk. Putting log files on a different disk from data is
-      very often beneficial for performance. You can also use raw disk
-      partitions (raw devices) as <literal>InnoDB</literal> data files,
-      which may speed up I/O. See <xref linkend="innodb-raw-devices"/>.
+      In some cases, database performance improves the if all data is
+      not placed on the same physical disk. Putting log files on a
+      different disk from data is very often beneficial for performance.
+      The example illustrates how to do this. It places the two data
+      files on different disks and places the log files on the third
+      disk. <literal>InnoDB</literal> fills the tablespace beginning
+      with the first data file. You can also use raw disk partitions
+      (raw devices) as <literal>InnoDB</literal> data files, which may
+      speed up I/O. See <xref linkend="innodb-raw-devices"/>.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -642,7 +557,7 @@
       By compiling MySQL yourself, you can use up to 64GB of physical
       memory in 32-bit Windows. See the description for
       <literal>innodb_buffer_pool_awe_mem_mb</literal> in
-      <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>.
+      <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -977,9 +892,9 @@
 
   </section>
 
-  <section id="innodb-start">
+  <section id="innodb-parameters">
 
-    <title>&title-innodb-start;</title>
+    <title>&title-innodb-parameters;</title>
 
     <remark role="todo">
       Have separate lists for options and variables?
@@ -2057,11 +1972,12 @@
       <title>&title-converting-tables-to-innodb;</title>
 
       <para>
-        Important: You should not convert MySQL system tables in the
+        Important: Do not convert MySQL system tables in the
         <literal>mysql</literal> database (such as
         <literal>user</literal> or <literal>host</literal>) to the
-        <literal>InnoDB</literal> type. The system tables must always be
-        of the <literal>MyISAM</literal> type.
+        <literal>InnoDB</literal> type. This is an unsupported
+        operation. The system tables must always be of the
+        <literal>MyISAM</literal> type.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -5358,8 +5274,8 @@
       would be good to throttle new row operations, and allocate more
       resources to the purge thread. The startup option and settable
       global variable <literal>innodb_max_purge_lag</literal> exists for
-      exactly this purpose. See <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>, for more
-      information.
+      exactly this purpose. See <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>, for
+      more information.
     </para>
 
   </section>

Modified: trunk/refman-5.0/renamed-nodes.txt
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.0/renamed-nodes.txt	2006-01-09 20:43:05 UTC (rev 745)
+++ trunk/refman-5.0/renamed-nodes.txt	2006-01-09 20:43:55 UTC (rev 746)
@@ -391,3 +391,4 @@
 localisation localization
 client-side-scripts client-utility-programs
 mysqlcc client-utility-programs
+innodb-start innodb-parameters

Modified: trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:05 UTC (rev 745)
+++ trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:55 UTC (rev 746)
@@ -2860,7 +2860,7 @@
               Options specific to particular storage engines: See
               <xref linkend="myisam-start"/>,
               <xref linkend="bdb-start"/>, and
-              <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>.
+              <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -5485,7 +5485,7 @@
           <citetitle>&title-refman-previous;</citetitle> and
           <citetitle>&title-refman-4-1;</citetitle>.
           <literal>InnoDB</literal> system variables are listed in
-          <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>.
+          <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -6904,7 +6904,7 @@
 
             <para>
               The <literal>InnoDB</literal> system variables are listed
-              in <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>.
+              in <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 

Modified: trunk/refman-5.1/innodb.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.1/innodb.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:05 UTC (rev 745)
+++ trunk/refman-5.1/innodb.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:55 UTC (rev 746)
@@ -55,16 +55,15 @@
 
     <para>
       <literal>InnoDB</literal> provides MySQL with a transaction-safe
-      (<literal>ACID</literal> compliant) storage engine with commit,
-      rollback, and crash recovery capabilities.
+      (<literal>ACID</literal> compliant) storage engine that has
+      commit, rollback, and crash recovery capabilities.
       <literal>InnoDB</literal> does locking on the row level and also
       provides an Oracle-style consistent non-locking read in
       <literal>SELECT</literal> statements. These features increase
       multi-user concurrency and performance. There is no need for lock
-      escalation in <literal>InnoDB</literal> because row-level locks in
-      <literal>InnoDB</literal> fit in very little space.
-      <literal>InnoDB</literal> also supports <literal>FOREIGN
-      KEY</literal> constraints. You can freely mix
+      escalation in <literal>InnoDB</literal> because row-level locks
+      fit in very little space. <literal>InnoDB</literal> also supports
+      <literal>FOREIGN KEY</literal> constraints. You can freely mix
       <literal>InnoDB</literal> tables with tables from other MySQL
       storage engines, even within the same statement.
     </para>
@@ -119,8 +118,8 @@
 
       <listitem>
         <para>
-          For the <literal>InnoDB</literal> storage engine, there's a
-          dedicated forum available on
+          A forum dedicated to the <literal>InnoDB</literal> storage
+          engine is available at
           <ulink url="http://forums.mysql.com/list.php?22"/>.
         </para>
       </listitem>
@@ -166,57 +165,60 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      Two important disk-based resources managed by the
-      <literal>InnoDB</literal> storage engine are its tablespace data
-      files and its log files.
-    </para>
-
-    <para>
-      If you specify no <literal>InnoDB</literal> configuration options,
-      MySQL creates an auto-extending 10MB data file named
-      <filename>ibdata1</filename> and two 5MB log files named
-      <filename>ib_logfile0</filename> and
-      <filename>ib_logfile1</filename> in the MySQL data directory.
-    </para>
-
-    <para>
       <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: <literal>InnoDB</literal>
       provides MySQL with a transaction-safe (<literal>ACID</literal>
-      compliant) storage engine with commit, rollback, and crash
-      recovery capabilities. <emphasis role="bold">It cannot do
-      so</emphasis> if the underlying operating system and hardware does
+      compliant) storage engine that has commit, rollback, and crash
+      recovery capabilities. <emphasis role="bold">However, it cannot do
+      so</emphasis> if the underlying operating system or hardware does
       not work as advertised. Many operating systems or disk subsystems
       may delay or reorder write operations in order to improve
-      performance. On some operating systems, the very system call
-      (<literal>fsync()</literal>) that should wait until all unwritten
-      data for a file has been flushed may actually return before the
-      data has been flushed to stable storage. Because of this, an
-      operating system crash or a power outage may destroy recently
-      committed data, or in the worst case, even corrupt the database
-      because of write operations having been reordered. If data
-      integrity is important to you, you should perform some
+      performance. On some operating systems, the very system call that
+      should wait until all unwritten data for a file has been flushed
+      &mdash; <literal>fsync()</literal> &mdash; might actually return
+      before the data has been flushed to stable storage. Because of
+      this, an operating system crash or a power outage may destroy
+      recently committed data, or in the worst case, even corrupt the
+      database because of write operations having been reordered. If
+      data integrity is important to you, you should perform some
       <quote>pull-the-plug</quote> tests before using anything in
-      production. On Mac OS X 10.3 and later, <literal>InnoDB</literal>
+      production. On Mac OS X 10.3 and up, <literal>InnoDB</literal>
       uses a special <literal>fcntl()</literal> file flush method. Under
       Linux, it is advisable to <emphasis role="bold">disable the
       write-back cache</emphasis>.
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      On ATAPI hard disks, a command like <literal>hdparm -W0
-      /dev/<replaceable>hda</replaceable></literal> may work.
+      On ATAPI hard disks, a command such <literal>hdparm -W0
+      /dev/hda</literal> may work to disable the write-back cache.
       <emphasis role="bold">Beware that some drives or disk controllers
       may be unable to disable the write-back cache.</emphasis>
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: To get good performance,
-      you should explicitly provide <literal>InnoDB</literal> parameters
-      as discussed in the following examples. Naturally, you should edit
-      the settings to suit your hardware and requirements.
+      Two important disk-based resources managed by the
+      <literal>InnoDB</literal> storage engine are its tablespace data
+      files and its log files.
     </para>
 
     <para>
+      <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: If you specify no
+      <literal>InnoDB</literal> configuration options, MySQL creates an
+      auto-extending 10MB data file named <filename>ibdata1</filename>
+      and two 5MB log files named <filename>ib_logfile0</filename> and
+      <filename>ib_logfile1</filename> in the MySQL data directory. To
+      get good performance, you should explicitly provide
+      <literal>InnoDB</literal> parameters as discussed in the following
+      examples. Naturally, you should edit the settings to suit your
+      hardware and requirements.
+    </para>
+
+    <para>
+      The examples shown here are representative. See
+      <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/> for additional information
+      about <literal>InnoDB</literal>-related configuration parameters.
+    </para>
+
+    <para>
       To set up the <literal>InnoDB</literal> tablespace files, use the
       <literal>innodb_data_file_path</literal> option in the
       <literal>[mysqld]</literal> section of the
@@ -245,7 +247,8 @@
     <para>
       This setting configures a single 10MB data file named
       <filename>ibdata1</filename> that is auto-extending. No location
-      for the file is given, so the default is the MySQL data directory.
+      for the file is given, so by default, <literal>InnoDB</literal>
+      creates it in the MySQL data directory.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -284,7 +287,8 @@
       If you specify the <literal>autoextend</literal> option for the
       last data file, <literal>InnoDB</literal> extends the data file if
       it runs out of free space in the tablespace. The increment is 8MB
-      at a time.
+      at a time by default. It can be modified by changing the
+      <literal>innodb_autoextend_increment</literal> system variable.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -294,12 +298,12 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      <literal>InnoDB</literal> is not aware of the maximum file size,
-      so be cautious on filesystems where the maximum file size is 2GB.
-      To specify a maximum size for an auto-extending data file, use the
-      <literal>max</literal> attribute. The following configuration
-      allows <filename>ibdata1</filename> to grow up to a limit of
-      500MB:
+      <literal>InnoDB</literal> is not aware of the filesystem maximum
+      file size, so be cautious on filesystems where the maximum file
+      size is a small value such as 2GB. To specify a maximum size for
+      an auto-extending data file, use the <literal>max</literal>
+      attribute. The following configuration allows
+      <filename>ibdata1</filename> to grow up to a limit of 500MB:
     </para>
 
 <programlisting>
@@ -336,11 +340,13 @@
       <literal>InnoDB</literal> forms the directory path for each data
       file by textually concatenating the value of
       <literal>innodb_data_home_dir</literal> to the data file name,
-      adding a slash or backslash between if needed. If the
-      <literal>innodb_data_home_dir</literal> option is not mentioned in
-      <filename>my.cnf</filename> at all, the default value is the
-      <quote>dot</quote> directory <filename>./</filename>, which means
-      the MySQL data directory.
+      adding a pathname separator (slash or backslash) between values if
+      necessary. If the <literal>innodb_data_home_dir</literal> option
+      is not mentioned in <filename>my.cnf</filename> at all, the
+      default value is the <quote>dot</quote> directory
+      <filename>./</filename>, which means the MySQL data directory.
+      (The MySQL server changes its current working directory to its
+      data directory when it begins executing.)
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -362,13 +368,10 @@
       RAM and one hard disk. The following example shows possible
       configuration parameters in <filename>my.cnf</filename> or
       <filename>my.ini</filename> for <literal>InnoDB</literal>,
-      including the <literal>autoextend</literal> attribute.
-    </para>
-
-    <para>
-      This example suits most users, both on Unix and Windows, who do
-      not want to distribute <literal>InnoDB</literal> data files and
-      log files on several disks. It creates an auto-extending data file
+      including the <literal>autoextend</literal> attribute. The example
+      suits most users, both on Unix and Windows, who do not want to
+      distribute <literal>InnoDB</literal> data files and log files onto
+      several disks. It creates an auto-extending data file
       <filename>ibdata1</filename> and two <literal>InnoDB</literal> log
       files <filename>ib_logfile0</filename> and
       <filename>ib_logfile1</filename> in the MySQL data directory.
@@ -416,12 +419,13 @@
       command prompt. <literal>InnoDB</literal> then prints the
       information about the database creation to the screen, so you can
       see what is happening. For example, on Windows, if
-      <command>mysqld-max</command> is located in
-      <filename>C:\mysql\bin</filename>, you can start it like this:
+      <command>mysqld-max</command> is located in <filename>C:\Program
+      Files\MySQL\MySQL Server &current-series;\bin</filename>, you can
+      start it like this:
     </para>
 
 <programlisting>
-C:\&gt; <userinput>C:\mysql\bin\mysqld-max --console</userinput>
+C:\&gt; <userinput>C:\Program Files\MySQL\MySQL Server &current-series;\bin\mysqld-max --console</userinput>
 </programlisting>
 
     <para>
@@ -436,127 +440,37 @@
       like.
     </para>
 
-    <remark role="todo">
-      Do we really need this info here, since it just repeats what's
-      found in the Installation and other chapters? /JS
-    </remark>
+    <para>
+      You can place <literal>InnoDB</literal> options in the
+      <literal>[mysqld]</literal> group of any option file that your
+      server reads when it starts. The locations for option files are
+      described in <xref linkend="option-files"/>.
+    </para>
 
     <para>
-      <emphasis role="bold">Where to specify options on
-      Windows?</emphasis> The rules for option files on Windows are as
-      follows:
+      If you installed MySQL on Windows using the installation and
+      configuration wizards, the option file will be the
+      <filename>my.ini</filename> file located in your MySQL
+      installation directory. See
+      <xref linkend="mysql-config-wizard-file-location"/>.
     </para>
 
-    <itemizedlist>
+    <para>
+      If your PC uses a boot loader where the <filename>C:</filename>
+      drive is not the boot drive, your only option is to use the
+      <filename>my.ini</filename> file in your Windows directory
+      (typically <filename>C:\WINDOWS</filename> or
+      <filename>C:\WINNT</filename>). You can use the
+      <literal>SET</literal> command at the command prompt in a console
+      window to print the value of <literal>WINDIR</literal>:
+    </para>
 
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          Only one of <filename>my.cnf</filename> or
-          <filename>my.ini</filename> should be created.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          The <filename>my.cnf</filename> file should be placed in the
-          root directory of the <filename>C:</filename> drive.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          The <filename>my.ini</filename> file should be placed in the
-          <literal>WINDIR</literal> directory; for example,
-          <filename>C:\WINDOWS</filename> or
-          <filename>C:\WINNT</filename>. You can use the
-          <literal>SET</literal> command at the command prompt in a
-          console window to print the value of
-          <literal>WINDIR</literal>:
-        </para>
-
 <programlisting>
 C:\&gt; <userinput>SET WINDIR</userinput>
-windir=C:\WINNT
+windir=C:\WINDOWS
 </programlisting>
-      </listitem>
 
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          If your PC uses a boot loader where the
-          <filename>C:</filename> drive is not the boot drive, your only
-          option is to use the <filename>my.ini</filename> file.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          If you installed MySQL using the installation and
-          configuration wizards, the <filename>my.ini</filename> file is
-          located in your MySQL installation directory. See
-          <xref linkend="mysql-config-wizard-file-location"/>.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-    </itemizedlist>
-
     <para>
-      <emphasis role="bold">Where to specify options on Unix?</emphasis>
-      On Unix, <command>mysqld</command> reads options from the
-      following files, if they exist, in the following order:
-    </para>
-
-    <itemizedlist>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          <filename>/etc/my.cnf</filename>
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          Global options.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          <filename>$MYSQL_HOME/my.cnf</filename>
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          Server-specific options.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          <filename>defaults-extra-file</filename>
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          The file specified with the
-          <option>--defaults-extra-file</option> option.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>
-          <filename>~/.my.cnf</filename>
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          User-specific options.
-        </para>
-      </listitem>
-
-    </itemizedlist>
-
-    <para>
-      <literal>MYSQL_HOME</literal> represents an environment variable,
-      which contains a path to the directory containing the
-      server-specific <literal>my.cnf</literal> file.
-    </para>
-
-    <para>
       If you want to make sure that <command>mysqld</command> reads
       options only from a specific file, you can use the
       <option>--defaults-option</option> as the first option on the
@@ -564,15 +478,15 @@
     </para>
 
 <programlisting>
-mysqld --defaults-file=your_path_to_my_cnf
+mysqld --defaults-file=<replaceable>your_path_to_my_cnf</replaceable>
 </programlisting>
 
     <para>
       <emphasis role="bold">An advanced <filename>my.cnf</filename>
       example.</emphasis> Suppose that you have a Linux computer with
-      2GB RAM and three 60GB hard disks (at directory paths
+      2GB RAM and three 60GB hard disks at directory paths
       <filename>/</filename>, <filename>/dr2</filename> and
-      <filename>/dr3</filename>). The following example shows possible
+      <filename>/dr3</filename>. The following example shows possible
       configuration parameters in <filename>my.cnf</filename> for
       <literal>InnoDB</literal>.
     </para>
@@ -606,14 +520,15 @@
 </programlisting>
 
     <para>
-      Note that the example places the two data files on different
-      disks. <literal>InnoDB</literal> fills the tablespace beginning
-      with the first data file. In some cases, it improves the
-      performance of the database if all data is not placed on the same
-      physical disk. Putting log files on a different disk from data is
-      very often beneficial for performance. You can also use raw disk
-      partitions (raw devices) as <literal>InnoDB</literal> data files,
-      which may speed up I/O. See <xref linkend="innodb-raw-devices"/>.
+      In some cases, database performance improves the if all data is
+      not placed on the same physical disk. Putting log files on a
+      different disk from data is very often beneficial for performance.
+      The example illustrates how to do this. It places the two data
+      files on different disks and places the log files on the third
+      disk. <literal>InnoDB</literal> fills the tablespace beginning
+      with the first data file. You can also use raw disk partitions
+      (raw devices) as <literal>InnoDB</literal> data files, which may
+      speed up I/O. See <xref linkend="innodb-raw-devices"/>.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -642,7 +557,7 @@
       By compiling MySQL yourself, you can use up to 64GB of physical
       memory in 32-bit Windows. See the description for
       <literal>innodb_buffer_pool_awe_mem_mb</literal> in
-      <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>.
+      <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -977,9 +892,9 @@
 
   </section>
 
-  <section id="innodb-start">
+  <section id="innodb-parameters">
 
-    <title>&title-innodb-start;</title>
+    <title>&title-innodb-parameters;</title>
 
     <remark role="todo">
       Have separate lists for options and variables?
@@ -2034,11 +1949,12 @@
       <title>&title-converting-tables-to-innodb;</title>
 
       <para>
-        Important: You should not convert MySQL system tables in the
+        Important: Do not convert MySQL system tables in the
         <literal>mysql</literal> database (such as
         <literal>user</literal> or <literal>host</literal>) to the
-        <literal>InnoDB</literal> type. The system tables must always be
-        of the <literal>MyISAM</literal> type.
+        <literal>InnoDB</literal> type. This is an unsupported
+        operation. The system tables must always be of the
+        <literal>MyISAM</literal> type.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -5319,8 +5235,8 @@
       would be good to throttle new row operations, and allocate more
       resources to the purge thread. The startup option and settable
       global variable <literal>innodb_max_purge_lag</literal> exists for
-      exactly this purpose. See <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>, for more
-      information.
+      exactly this purpose. See <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>, for
+      more information.
     </para>
 
   </section>

Modified: trunk/refman-5.1/renamed-nodes.txt
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.1/renamed-nodes.txt	2006-01-09 20:43:05 UTC (rev 745)
+++ trunk/refman-5.1/renamed-nodes.txt	2006-01-09 20:43:55 UTC (rev 746)
@@ -95,3 +95,4 @@
 localisation localization
 client-side-scripts client-utility-programs
 mysqlcc client-utility-programs
+innodb-start innodb-parameters

Modified: trunk/refman-common/news-3.23.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-common/news-3.23.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:05 UTC (rev 745)
+++ trunk/refman-common/news-3.23.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:55 UTC (rev 746)
@@ -382,7 +382,7 @@
           The default option for
           <literal>innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit</literal> was changed
           from 0 to 1 to make <literal>InnoDB</literal> tables ACID by
-          default. See <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>.
+          default. See <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 

Modified: trunk/refman-common/news-4.0.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-common/news-4.0.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:05 UTC (rev 745)
+++ trunk/refman-common/news-4.0.xml	2006-01-09 20:43:55 UTC (rev 746)
@@ -5203,7 +5203,7 @@
           The default option for
           <literal>innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit</literal> was changed
           from 0 to 1 to make <literal>InnoDB</literal> tables ACID by
-          default. See <xref linkend="innodb-start"/>.
+          default. See <xref linkend="innodb-parameters"/>.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 

Modified: trunk/refman-common/titles.en.ent
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-common/titles.en.ent	2006-01-09 20:43:05 UTC (rev 745)
+++ trunk/refman-common/titles.en.ent	2006-01-09 20:43:55 UTC (rev 746)
@@ -545,7 +545,7 @@
 <!ENTITY title-innodb-physical-structure "Physical Structure of an Index">
 <!ENTITY title-innodb-raw-devices "Using Raw Devices for the Shared Tablespace">
 <!ENTITY title-innodb-restrictions "Restrictions on <literal>InnoDB</literal> Tables">
-<!ENTITY title-innodb-start "<literal>InnoDB</literal> Startup Options and System Variables">
+<!ENTITY title-innodb-parameters "<literal>InnoDB</literal> Startup Options and System Variables">
 <!ENTITY title-innodb-transaction-isolation "<literal>InnoDB</literal> and <literal>TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL</literal>">
 <!ENTITY title-innodb-transaction-model "<literal>InnoDB</literal> Transaction Model and Locking">
 <!ENTITY title-innodb-transactions-with-different-apis "How to Use Transactions in <literal>InnoDB</literal> with Different APIs">

Thread
svn commit - mysqldoc@docsrva: r746 - in trunk: . refman-4.1 refman-5.0 refman-5.1 refman-commonpaul9 Jan