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From:paul Date:January 4 2006 11:59pm
Subject:svn commit - mysqldoc@docsrva: r683 - in trunk: . refman-4.1 refman-5.0 refman-5.1
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Author: paul
Date: 2006-01-05 00:59:45 +0100 (Thu, 05 Jan 2006)
New Revision: 683

Log:
 r5857@frost:  paul | 2006-01-04 17:58:49 -0600
 General revisions.


Modified:
   trunk/
   trunk/refman-4.1/introduction.xml
   trunk/refman-5.0/introduction.xml
   trunk/refman-5.1/introduction.xml


Property changes on: trunk
___________________________________________________________________
Name: svk:merge
   - b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:5853
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:1933
   + b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:5857
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:1933

Modified: trunk/refman-4.1/introduction.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-4.1/introduction.xml	2006-01-04 23:59:18 UTC (rev 682)
+++ trunk/refman-4.1/introduction.xml	2006-01-04 23:59:45 UTC (rev 683)
@@ -1366,7 +1366,7 @@
 
           <para>
             MySQL Server maps each database to a directory under the
-            MySQL data directory, and tables within a database to
+            MySQL data directory, and maps tables within a database to
             filenames in the database directory. This has a few
             implications:
           </para>
@@ -1395,10 +1395,10 @@
                   <secondary>of table names</secondary>
                 </indexterm>
 
-                Database names and table names are case sensitive in
-                MySQL Server on operating systems that have
-                case-sensitive filenames (such as most Unix systems).
-                See <xref linkend="name-case-sensitivity"/>.
+                Database and table names are case sensitive in MySQL
+                Server on operating systems that have case-sensitive
+                filenames (such as most Unix systems). See
+                <xref linkend="name-case-sensitivity"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1407,19 +1407,23 @@
                 You can use standard system commands to back up, rename,
                 move, delete, and copy tables that are managed by the
                 <literal>MyISAM</literal> or <literal>ISAM</literal>
-                storage engines. For example, to rename a
-                <literal>MyISAM</literal> table, rename the
+                storage engines. For example, it is possible to rename a
+                <literal>MyISAM</literal> table by renaming the
                 <filename>.MYD</filename>, <filename>.MYI</filename>,
                 and <filename>.frm</filename> files to which the table
-                corresponds.
+                corresponds. (Nevertheless, it is preferable to use
+                <literal>RENAME TABLE</literal> or <literal>ALTER TABLE
+                &hellip; RENAME</literal> and let the server rename the
+                files.)
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
           </itemizedlist>
 
           <para>
-            Database, table, index, column, or alias names may begin
-            with a digit (but may not consist solely of digits).
+            Database and table names cannot contain pathname separator
+            characters (&lsquo;<literal>/</literal>&rsquo;,
+            &lsquo;<literal>\</literal>&rsquo;).
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -1432,10 +1436,15 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Strings may be enclosed by either
+                By default, strings can be enclosed by either
                 &lsquo;<literal>"</literal>&rsquo; or
                 &lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo;, not just by
-                &lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo;.
+                &lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo;. (If the
+                <literal>ANSI_QUOTES</literal> SQL mode is enabled,
+                strings can be enclosed only by
+                &lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo; and the server
+                interprets strings enclosed by
+                &lsquo;<literal>"</literal>&rsquo; as identifiers.)
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1493,8 +1502,9 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                <literal>EXPLAIN SELECT</literal> to get a description
-                of how tables are joined.
+                <literal>EXPLAIN SELECT</literal> to obtain a
+                description of how tables are processed by the query
+                optimizer.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1517,19 +1527,19 @@
                 The <literal>SHOW</literal> statement. See
                 <xref linkend="show"/>.
               </para>
-
-              <indexterm>
-                <primary>Oracle compatibility</primary>
-              </indexterm>
-
-              <indexterm>
-                <primary>compatibility</primary>
-                <secondary>with Oracle</secondary>
-              </indexterm>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
+                <indexterm>
+                  <primary>Oracle compatibility</primary>
+                </indexterm>
+
+                <indexterm>
+                  <primary>compatibility</primary>
+                  <secondary>with Oracle</secondary>
+                </indexterm>
+
                 Use of <literal>LOAD DATA INFILE</literal>. In many
                 cases, this syntax is compatible with Oracle's
                 <literal>LOAD DATA INFILE</literal>. See
@@ -1547,31 +1557,34 @@
             <listitem>
               <para>
                 Use of <literal>REPLACE</literal> instead of
-                <literal>DELETE</literal> + <literal>INSERT</literal>.
-                See <xref linkend="replace"/>.
+                <literal>DELETE</literal> plus
+                <literal>INSERT</literal>. See
+                <xref linkend="replace"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Use of <literal>CHANGE col_name</literal>, <literal>DROP
-                col_name</literal>, or <literal>DROP INDEX</literal>,
-                <literal>IGNORE</literal> or <literal>RENAME</literal>
-                in an <literal>ALTER TABLE</literal> statement. Use of
-                multiple <literal>ADD</literal>,
-                <literal>ALTER</literal>, <literal>DROP</literal>, or
-                <literal>CHANGE</literal> clauses in an <literal>ALTER
-                TABLE</literal> statement. See
-                <xref linkend="alter-table"/>.
+                Use of <literal>CHANGE
+                <replaceable>col_name</replaceable></literal>,
+                <literal>DROP
+                <replaceable>col_name</replaceable></literal>, or
+                <literal>DROP INDEX</literal>, <literal>IGNORE</literal>
+                or <literal>RENAME</literal> in <literal>ALTER
+                TABLE</literal> statements. Use of multiple
+                <literal>ADD</literal>, <literal>ALTER</literal>,
+                <literal>DROP</literal>, or <literal>CHANGE</literal>
+                clauses in an <literal>ALTER TABLE</literal> statement.
+                See <xref linkend="alter-table"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Use of index names, indexes on a prefix of a field, and
+                Use of index names, indexes on a prefix of a column, and
                 use of <literal>INDEX</literal> or
-                <literal>KEY</literal> in a <literal>CREATE
-                TABLE</literal> statement. See
+                <literal>KEY</literal> in <literal>CREATE
+                TABLE</literal> statements. See
                 <xref linkend="create-table"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
@@ -1592,8 +1605,8 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                You can drop multiple tables with a single <literal>DROP
-                TABLE</literal> statement.
+                The capability of dropping multiple tables with a single
+                <literal>DROP TABLE</literal> statement.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1608,7 +1621,8 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                <literal>INSERT INTO ... SET col_name = ...</literal>
+                <literal>INSERT INTO ... SET
+                <replaceable>col_name</replaceable> = ...</literal>
                 syntax.
               </para>
             </listitem>
@@ -1632,24 +1646,24 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Use of <literal>INTO OUTFILE</literal> and
-                <literal>STRAIGHT_JOIN</literal> in a
-                <literal>SELECT</literal> statement. See
+                Use of <literal>INTO OUTFILE</literal> in
+                <literal>SELECT</literal> statements. See
                 <xref linkend="select"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                The <literal>SQL_SMALL_RESULT</literal> option in a
-                <literal>SELECT</literal> statement.
+                Options such as <literal>STRAIGHT_JOIN</literal> or
+                <literal>SQL_SMALL_RESULT</literal> in
+                <literal>SELECT</literal> statements.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
                 You don't need to name all selected columns in the
-                <literal>GROUP BY</literal> part. This gives better
+                <literal>GROUP BY</literal> clause. This gives better
                 performance for some very specific, but quite normal
                 queries. See
                 <xref linkend="group-by-functions-and-modifiers"/>.
@@ -1660,7 +1674,7 @@
               <para>
                 You can specify <literal>ASC</literal> and
                 <literal>DESC</literal> with <literal>GROUP
-                BY</literal>.
+                BY</literal>, not just with <literal>ORDER BY</literal>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1682,26 +1696,26 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            Column types
+            Data types
           </para>
 
           <itemizedlist>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                The column types <literal>MEDIUMINT</literal>,
-                <literal>SET</literal>, <literal>ENUM</literal>, and the
-                different <literal>BLOB</literal> and
-                <literal>TEXT</literal> types.
+                The <literal>MEDIUMINT</literal>,
+                <literal>SET</literal>, and <literal>ENUM</literal> data
+                types, and the various <literal>BLOB</literal> and
+                <literal>TEXT</literal> data types.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                The column attributes <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal>,
+                The <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal>,
                 <literal>BINARY</literal>, <literal>NULL</literal>,
                 <literal>UNSIGNED</literal>, and
-                <literal>ZEROFILL</literal>.
+                <literal>ZEROFILL</literal> data type attributes.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1717,7 +1731,7 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                To make it easier for users who come from other SQL
+                To make it easier for users who migrate from other SQL
                 environments, MySQL Server supports aliases for many
                 functions. For example, all string functions support
                 both standard SQL syntax and ODBC syntax.
@@ -1743,17 +1757,19 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Use of <literal>COUNT(DISTINCT list)</literal> where
-                <literal>list</literal> has more than one element.
+                Use of <literal>COUNT(DISTINCT
+                <replaceable>value_list</replaceable>)</literal> where
+                <replaceable>value_list</replaceable> has more than one
+                element.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                All string comparisons are case-insensitive by default,
-                with sort ordering determined by the current character
-                set (cp1252 Latin1 by default). If you don't like this,
-                you should declare your columns with the
+                String comparisons are case-insensitive by default, with
+                sort ordering determined by the current character set
+                (cp1252 Latin1 by default). If you don't like this, you
+                should declare your columns with the
                 <literal>BINARY</literal> attribute or use the
                 <literal>BINARY</literal> cast, which causes comparisons
                 to be done using the underlying character code values
@@ -1773,11 +1789,12 @@
             <listitem>
               <para>
                 The <literal>%</literal> operator is a synonym for
-                <literal>MOD()</literal>. That is, <literal>N %
-                M</literal> is equivalent to
-                <literal>MOD(N,M)</literal>. <literal>%</literal> is
-                supported for C programmers and for compatibility with
-                PostgreSQL.
+                <literal>MOD()</literal>. That is,
+                <literal><replaceable>N</replaceable> %
+                <replaceable>M</replaceable></literal> is equivalent to
+                <literal>MOD(<replaceable>N</replaceable>,<replaceable>M</replaceable>)</literal>.
+                <literal>%</literal> is supported for C programmers and
+                for compatibility with PostgreSQL.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1790,28 +1807,27 @@
                 <literal>&gt;&gt;</literal>,
                 <literal>&lt;=&gt;</literal>, <literal>AND</literal>,
                 <literal>OR</literal>, or <literal>LIKE</literal>
-                operators may be used in column comparisons to the left
-                of the <literal>FROM</literal> in
-                <literal>SELECT</literal> statements. For example:
+                operators may be used in expressions in the output
+                column list (to the left of the <literal>FROM</literal>)
+                in <literal>SELECT</literal> statements. For example:
               </para>
 
 <programlisting>
-mysql&gt; <userinput>SELECT col1=1 AND col2=2 FROM <replaceable>tbl_name</replaceable>;</userinput>
+mysql&gt; <userinput>SELECT col1=1 AND col2=2 FROM my_table;</userinput>
 </programlisting>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                The <literal>LAST_INSERT_ID()</literal> function that
-                returns the most recent
-                <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal> value. See
-                <xref linkend="information-functions"/>.
+                The <literal>LAST_INSERT_ID()</literal> function returns
+                the most recent <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal> value.
+                See <xref linkend="information-functions"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                <literal>LIKE</literal> is allowed on numeric columns.
+                <literal>LIKE</literal> is allowed on numeric values.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1826,7 +1842,7 @@
               <para>
                 <literal>CONCAT()</literal> or <literal>CHAR()</literal>
                 with one argument or more than two arguments. (In MySQL
-                Server, these functions can take any number of
+                Server, these functions can take a variable number of
                 arguments.)
               </para>
             </listitem>

Modified: trunk/refman-5.0/introduction.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.0/introduction.xml	2006-01-04 23:59:18 UTC (rev 682)
+++ trunk/refman-5.0/introduction.xml	2006-01-04 23:59:45 UTC (rev 683)
@@ -972,7 +972,7 @@
 
           <para>
             MySQL Server maps each database to a directory under the
-            MySQL data directory, and tables within a database to
+            MySQL data directory, and maps tables within a database to
             filenames in the database directory. This has a few
             implications:
           </para>
@@ -1001,10 +1001,10 @@
                   <secondary>of table names</secondary>
                 </indexterm>
 
-                Database names and table names are case sensitive in
-                MySQL Server on operating systems that have
-                case-sensitive filenames (such as most Unix systems).
-                See <xref linkend="name-case-sensitivity"/>.
+                Database and table names are case sensitive in MySQL
+                Server on operating systems that have case-sensitive
+                filenames (such as most Unix systems). See
+                <xref linkend="name-case-sensitivity"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1012,20 +1012,23 @@
               <para>
                 You can use standard system commands to back up, rename,
                 move, delete, and copy tables that are managed by the
-                <literal>MyISAM</literal> or <literal>ISAM</literal>
-                storage engines. For example, to rename a
-                <literal>MyISAM</literal> table, rename the
-                <filename>.MYD</filename>, <filename>.MYI</filename>,
-                and <filename>.frm</filename> files to which the table
-                corresponds.
+                <literal>MyISAM</literal> storage engine. For example,
+                it is possible to rename a <literal>MyISAM</literal>
+                table by renaming the <filename>.MYD</filename>,
+                <filename>.MYI</filename>, and <filename>.frm</filename>
+                files to which the table corresponds. (Nevertheless, it
+                is preferable to use <literal>RENAME TABLE</literal> or
+                <literal>ALTER TABLE &hellip; RENAME</literal> and let
+                the server rename the files.)
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
           </itemizedlist>
 
           <para>
-            Database, table, index, column, or alias names may begin
-            with a digit (but may not consist solely of digits).
+            Database and table names cannot contain pathname separator
+            characters (&lsquo;<literal>/</literal>&rsquo;,
+            &lsquo;<literal>\</literal>&rsquo;).
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -1038,10 +1041,15 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Strings may be enclosed by either
+                By default, strings can be enclosed by either
                 &lsquo;<literal>"</literal>&rsquo; or
                 &lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo;, not just by
-                &lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo;.
+                &lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo;. (If the
+                <literal>ANSI_QUOTES</literal> SQL mode is enabled,
+                strings can be enclosed only by
+                &lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo; and the server
+                interprets strings enclosed by
+                &lsquo;<literal>"</literal>&rsquo; as identifiers.)
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1099,8 +1107,9 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                <literal>EXPLAIN SELECT</literal> to get a description
-                of how tables are joined.
+                <literal>EXPLAIN SELECT</literal> to obtain a
+                description of how tables are processed by the query
+                optimizer.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1121,21 +1130,26 @@
             <listitem>
               <para>
                 The <literal>SHOW</literal> statement. See
-                <xref linkend="show"/>.
+                <xref linkend="show"/>. As of MySQL 5.0, the information
+                produced by many of the MySQL-specific
+                <literal>SHOW</literal> statements can be obtained in
+                more standard fashion by using <literal>SELECT</literal>
+                to query <literal>INFORMATION_SCHEMA</literal>. See
+                <xref linkend="information-schema"/>.
               </para>
-
-              <indexterm>
-                <primary>Oracle compatibility</primary>
-              </indexterm>
-
-              <indexterm>
-                <primary>compatibility</primary>
-                <secondary>with Oracle</secondary>
-              </indexterm>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
+                <indexterm>
+                  <primary>Oracle compatibility</primary>
+                </indexterm>
+
+                <indexterm>
+                  <primary>compatibility</primary>
+                  <secondary>with Oracle</secondary>
+                </indexterm>
+
                 Use of <literal>LOAD DATA INFILE</literal>. In many
                 cases, this syntax is compatible with Oracle's
                 <literal>LOAD DATA INFILE</literal>. See
@@ -1153,31 +1167,34 @@
             <listitem>
               <para>
                 Use of <literal>REPLACE</literal> instead of
-                <literal>DELETE</literal> + <literal>INSERT</literal>.
-                See <xref linkend="replace"/>.
+                <literal>DELETE</literal> plus
+                <literal>INSERT</literal>. See
+                <xref linkend="replace"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Use of <literal>CHANGE col_name</literal>, <literal>DROP
-                col_name</literal>, or <literal>DROP INDEX</literal>,
-                <literal>IGNORE</literal> or <literal>RENAME</literal>
-                in an <literal>ALTER TABLE</literal> statement. Use of
-                multiple <literal>ADD</literal>,
-                <literal>ALTER</literal>, <literal>DROP</literal>, or
-                <literal>CHANGE</literal> clauses in an <literal>ALTER
-                TABLE</literal> statement. See
-                <xref linkend="alter-table"/>.
+                Use of <literal>CHANGE
+                <replaceable>col_name</replaceable></literal>,
+                <literal>DROP
+                <replaceable>col_name</replaceable></literal>, or
+                <literal>DROP INDEX</literal>, <literal>IGNORE</literal>
+                or <literal>RENAME</literal> in <literal>ALTER
+                TABLE</literal> statements. Use of multiple
+                <literal>ADD</literal>, <literal>ALTER</literal>,
+                <literal>DROP</literal>, or <literal>CHANGE</literal>
+                clauses in an <literal>ALTER TABLE</literal> statement.
+                See <xref linkend="alter-table"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Use of index names, indexes on a prefix of a field, and
+                Use of index names, indexes on a prefix of a column, and
                 use of <literal>INDEX</literal> or
-                <literal>KEY</literal> in a <literal>CREATE
-                TABLE</literal> statement. See
+                <literal>KEY</literal> in <literal>CREATE
+                TABLE</literal> statements. See
                 <xref linkend="create-table"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
@@ -1198,8 +1215,8 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                You can drop multiple tables with a single <literal>DROP
-                TABLE</literal> statement.
+                The capability of dropping multiple tables with a single
+                <literal>DROP TABLE</literal> statement.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1214,7 +1231,8 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                <literal>INSERT INTO ... SET col_name = ...</literal>
+                <literal>INSERT INTO ... SET
+                <replaceable>col_name</replaceable> = ...</literal>
                 syntax.
               </para>
             </listitem>
@@ -1238,24 +1256,24 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Use of <literal>INTO OUTFILE</literal> and
-                <literal>STRAIGHT_JOIN</literal> in a
-                <literal>SELECT</literal> statement. See
+                Use of <literal>INTO OUTFILE</literal> in
+                <literal>SELECT</literal> statements. See
                 <xref linkend="select"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                The <literal>SQL_SMALL_RESULT</literal> option in a
-                <literal>SELECT</literal> statement.
+                Options such as <literal>STRAIGHT_JOIN</literal> or
+                <literal>SQL_SMALL_RESULT</literal> in
+                <literal>SELECT</literal> statements.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
                 You don't need to name all selected columns in the
-                <literal>GROUP BY</literal> part. This gives better
+                <literal>GROUP BY</literal> clause. This gives better
                 performance for some very specific, but quite normal
                 queries. See
                 <xref linkend="group-by-functions-and-modifiers"/>.
@@ -1266,7 +1284,7 @@
               <para>
                 You can specify <literal>ASC</literal> and
                 <literal>DESC</literal> with <literal>GROUP
-                BY</literal>.
+                BY</literal>, not just with <literal>ORDER BY</literal>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1288,26 +1306,26 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            Column types
+            Data types
           </para>
 
           <itemizedlist>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                The column types <literal>MEDIUMINT</literal>,
-                <literal>SET</literal>, <literal>ENUM</literal>, and the
-                different <literal>BLOB</literal> and
-                <literal>TEXT</literal> types.
+                The <literal>MEDIUMINT</literal>,
+                <literal>SET</literal>, and <literal>ENUM</literal> data
+                types, and the various <literal>BLOB</literal> and
+                <literal>TEXT</literal> data types.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                The column attributes <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal>,
+                The <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal>,
                 <literal>BINARY</literal>, <literal>NULL</literal>,
                 <literal>UNSIGNED</literal>, and
-                <literal>ZEROFILL</literal>.
+                <literal>ZEROFILL</literal> data type attributes.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1323,7 +1341,7 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                To make it easier for users who come from other SQL
+                To make it easier for users who migrate from other SQL
                 environments, MySQL Server supports aliases for many
                 functions. For example, all string functions support
                 both standard SQL syntax and ODBC syntax.
@@ -1349,17 +1367,19 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Use of <literal>COUNT(DISTINCT list)</literal> where
-                <literal>list</literal> has more than one element.
+                Use of <literal>COUNT(DISTINCT
+                <replaceable>value_list</replaceable>)</literal> where
+                <replaceable>value_list</replaceable> has more than one
+                element.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                All string comparisons are case-insensitive by default,
-                with sort ordering determined by the current character
-                set (cp1252 Latin1 by default). If you don't like this,
-                you should declare your columns with the
+                String comparisons are case-insensitive by default, with
+                sort ordering determined by the current character set
+                (cp1252 Latin1 by default). If you don't like this, you
+                should declare your columns with the
                 <literal>BINARY</literal> attribute or use the
                 <literal>BINARY</literal> cast, which causes comparisons
                 to be done using the underlying character code values
@@ -1379,11 +1399,12 @@
             <listitem>
               <para>
                 The <literal>%</literal> operator is a synonym for
-                <literal>MOD()</literal>. That is, <literal>N %
-                M</literal> is equivalent to
-                <literal>MOD(N,M)</literal>. <literal>%</literal> is
-                supported for C programmers and for compatibility with
-                PostgreSQL.
+                <literal>MOD()</literal>. That is,
+                <literal><replaceable>N</replaceable> %
+                <replaceable>M</replaceable></literal> is equivalent to
+                <literal>MOD(<replaceable>N</replaceable>,<replaceable>M</replaceable>)</literal>.
+                <literal>%</literal> is supported for C programmers and
+                for compatibility with PostgreSQL.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1396,28 +1417,27 @@
                 <literal>&gt;&gt;</literal>,
                 <literal>&lt;=&gt;</literal>, <literal>AND</literal>,
                 <literal>OR</literal>, or <literal>LIKE</literal>
-                operators may be used in column comparisons to the left
-                of the <literal>FROM</literal> in
-                <literal>SELECT</literal> statements. For example:
+                operators may be used in expressions in the output
+                column list (to the left of the <literal>FROM</literal>)
+                in <literal>SELECT</literal> statements. For example:
               </para>
 
 <programlisting>
-mysql&gt; <userinput>SELECT col1=1 AND col2=2 FROM <replaceable>tbl_name</replaceable>;</userinput>
+mysql&gt; <userinput>SELECT col1=1 AND col2=2 FROM my_table;</userinput>
 </programlisting>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                The <literal>LAST_INSERT_ID()</literal> function that
-                returns the most recent
-                <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal> value. See
-                <xref linkend="information-functions"/>.
+                The <literal>LAST_INSERT_ID()</literal> function returns
+                the most recent <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal> value.
+                See <xref linkend="information-functions"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                <literal>LIKE</literal> is allowed on numeric columns.
+                <literal>LIKE</literal> is allowed on numeric values.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1432,7 +1452,7 @@
               <para>
                 <literal>CONCAT()</literal> or <literal>CHAR()</literal>
                 with one argument or more than two arguments. (In MySQL
-                Server, these functions can take any number of
+                Server, these functions can take a variable number of
                 arguments.)
               </para>
             </listitem>
@@ -1508,8 +1528,8 @@
         <listitem>
           <para>
             For <literal>VARCHAR</literal> columns, trailing spaces are
-            removed when the value is stored. (Fixed in MySQL 5.0.3).
-            See <xref linkend="bugs"/>.
+            removed when the value is stored. (This is fixed in MySQL
+            5.0.3). See <xref linkend="bugs"/>.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -1517,8 +1537,8 @@
           <para>
             In some cases, <literal>CHAR</literal> columns are silently
             converted to <literal>VARCHAR</literal> columns when you
-            define a table or alter its structure. (Fixed in MySQL
-            5.0.3). See <xref linkend="silent-column-changes"/>.
+            define a table or alter its structure. (This is fixed in
+            MySQL 5.0.3). See <xref linkend="silent-column-changes"/>.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 

Modified: trunk/refman-5.1/introduction.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.1/introduction.xml	2006-01-04 23:59:18 UTC (rev 682)
+++ trunk/refman-5.1/introduction.xml	2006-01-04 23:59:45 UTC (rev 683)
@@ -731,7 +731,7 @@
 
           <para>
             MySQL Server maps each database to a directory under the
-            MySQL data directory, and tables within a database to
+            MySQL data directory, and maps tables within a database to
             filenames in the database directory. This has a few
             implications:
           </para>
@@ -760,10 +760,10 @@
                   <secondary>of table names</secondary>
                 </indexterm>
 
-                Database names and table names are case sensitive in
-                MySQL Server on operating systems that have
-                case-sensitive filenames (such as most Unix systems).
-                See <xref linkend="name-case-sensitivity"/>.
+                Database and table names are case sensitive in MySQL
+                Server on operating systems that have case-sensitive
+                filenames (such as most Unix systems). See
+                <xref linkend="name-case-sensitivity"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -771,20 +771,23 @@
               <para>
                 You can use standard system commands to back up, rename,
                 move, delete, and copy tables that are managed by the
-                <literal>MyISAM</literal> or <literal>ISAM</literal>
-                storage engines. For example, to rename a
-                <literal>MyISAM</literal> table, rename the
-                <filename>.MYD</filename>, <filename>.MYI</filename>,
-                and <filename>.frm</filename> files to which the table
-                corresponds.
+                <literal>MyISAM</literal> storage engine. For example,
+                it is possible to rename a <literal>MyISAM</literal>
+                table by renaming the <filename>.MYD</filename>,
+                <filename>.MYI</filename>, and <filename>.frm</filename>
+                files to which the table corresponds. (Nevertheless, it
+                is preferable to use <literal>RENAME TABLE</literal> or
+                <literal>ALTER TABLE &hellip; RENAME</literal> and let
+                the server rename the files.)
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
           </itemizedlist>
 
           <para>
-            Database, table, index, column, or alias names may begin
-            with a digit (but may not consist solely of digits).
+            Database and table names cannot contain pathname separator
+            characters (&lsquo;<literal>/</literal>&rsquo;,
+            &lsquo;<literal>\</literal>&rsquo;).
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -797,10 +800,15 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Strings may be enclosed by either
+                By default, strings can be enclosed by either
                 &lsquo;<literal>"</literal>&rsquo; or
                 &lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo;, not just by
-                &lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo;.
+                &lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo;. (If the
+                <literal>ANSI_QUOTES</literal> SQL mode is enabled,
+                strings can be enclosed only by
+                &lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo; and the server
+                interprets strings enclosed by
+                &lsquo;<literal>"</literal>&rsquo; as identifiers.)
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -858,8 +866,9 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                <literal>EXPLAIN SELECT</literal> to get a description
-                of how tables are joined.
+                <literal>EXPLAIN SELECT</literal> to obtain a
+                description of how tables are processed by the query
+                optimizer.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -880,21 +889,26 @@
             <listitem>
               <para>
                 The <literal>SHOW</literal> statement. See
-                <xref linkend="show"/>.
+                <xref linkend="show"/>. As of MySQL 5.0, the information
+                produced by many of the MySQL-specific
+                <literal>SHOW</literal> statements can be obtained in
+                more standard fashion by using <literal>SELECT</literal>
+                to query <literal>INFORMATION_SCHEMA</literal>. See
+                <xref linkend="information-schema"/>.
               </para>
-
-              <indexterm>
-                <primary>Oracle compatibility</primary>
-              </indexterm>
-
-              <indexterm>
-                <primary>compatibility</primary>
-                <secondary>with Oracle</secondary>
-              </indexterm>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
+                <indexterm>
+                  <primary>Oracle compatibility</primary>
+                </indexterm>
+
+                <indexterm>
+                  <primary>compatibility</primary>
+                  <secondary>with Oracle</secondary>
+                </indexterm>
+
                 Use of <literal>LOAD DATA INFILE</literal>. In many
                 cases, this syntax is compatible with Oracle's
                 <literal>LOAD DATA INFILE</literal>. See
@@ -912,31 +926,34 @@
             <listitem>
               <para>
                 Use of <literal>REPLACE</literal> instead of
-                <literal>DELETE</literal> + <literal>INSERT</literal>.
-                See <xref linkend="replace"/>.
+                <literal>DELETE</literal> plus
+                <literal>INSERT</literal>. See
+                <xref linkend="replace"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Use of <literal>CHANGE col_name</literal>, <literal>DROP
-                col_name</literal>, or <literal>DROP INDEX</literal>,
-                <literal>IGNORE</literal> or <literal>RENAME</literal>
-                in an <literal>ALTER TABLE</literal> statement. Use of
-                multiple <literal>ADD</literal>,
-                <literal>ALTER</literal>, <literal>DROP</literal>, or
-                <literal>CHANGE</literal> clauses in an <literal>ALTER
-                TABLE</literal> statement. See
-                <xref linkend="alter-table"/>.
+                Use of <literal>CHANGE
+                <replaceable>col_name</replaceable></literal>,
+                <literal>DROP
+                <replaceable>col_name</replaceable></literal>, or
+                <literal>DROP INDEX</literal>, <literal>IGNORE</literal>
+                or <literal>RENAME</literal> in <literal>ALTER
+                TABLE</literal> statements. Use of multiple
+                <literal>ADD</literal>, <literal>ALTER</literal>,
+                <literal>DROP</literal>, or <literal>CHANGE</literal>
+                clauses in an <literal>ALTER TABLE</literal> statement.
+                See <xref linkend="alter-table"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Use of index names, indexes on a prefix of a field, and
+                Use of index names, indexes on a prefix of a column, and
                 use of <literal>INDEX</literal> or
-                <literal>KEY</literal> in a <literal>CREATE
-                TABLE</literal> statement. See
+                <literal>KEY</literal> in <literal>CREATE
+                TABLE</literal> statements. See
                 <xref linkend="create-table"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
@@ -957,8 +974,8 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                You can drop multiple tables with a single <literal>DROP
-                TABLE</literal> statement.
+                The capability of dropping multiple tables with a single
+                <literal>DROP TABLE</literal> statement.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -973,7 +990,8 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                <literal>INSERT INTO ... SET col_name = ...</literal>
+                <literal>INSERT INTO ... SET
+                <replaceable>col_name</replaceable> = ...</literal>
                 syntax.
               </para>
             </listitem>
@@ -997,24 +1015,24 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Use of <literal>INTO OUTFILE</literal> and
-                <literal>STRAIGHT_JOIN</literal> in a
-                <literal>SELECT</literal> statement. See
+                Use of <literal>INTO OUTFILE</literal> in
+                <literal>SELECT</literal> statements. See
                 <xref linkend="select"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                The <literal>SQL_SMALL_RESULT</literal> option in a
-                <literal>SELECT</literal> statement.
+                Options such as <literal>STRAIGHT_JOIN</literal> or
+                <literal>SQL_SMALL_RESULT</literal> in
+                <literal>SELECT</literal> statements.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
                 You don't need to name all selected columns in the
-                <literal>GROUP BY</literal> part. This gives better
+                <literal>GROUP BY</literal> clause. This gives better
                 performance for some very specific, but quite normal
                 queries. See
                 <xref linkend="group-by-functions-and-modifiers"/>.
@@ -1025,7 +1043,7 @@
               <para>
                 You can specify <literal>ASC</literal> and
                 <literal>DESC</literal> with <literal>GROUP
-                BY</literal>.
+                BY</literal>, not just with <literal>ORDER BY</literal>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1047,26 +1065,26 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            Column types
+            Data types
           </para>
 
           <itemizedlist>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                The column types <literal>MEDIUMINT</literal>,
-                <literal>SET</literal>, <literal>ENUM</literal>, and the
-                different <literal>BLOB</literal> and
-                <literal>TEXT</literal> types.
+                The <literal>MEDIUMINT</literal>,
+                <literal>SET</literal>, and <literal>ENUM</literal> data
+                types, and the various <literal>BLOB</literal> and
+                <literal>TEXT</literal> data types.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                The column attributes <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal>,
+                The <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal>,
                 <literal>BINARY</literal>, <literal>NULL</literal>,
                 <literal>UNSIGNED</literal>, and
-                <literal>ZEROFILL</literal>.
+                <literal>ZEROFILL</literal> data type attributes.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1082,7 +1100,7 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                To make it easier for users who come from other SQL
+                To make it easier for users who migrate from other SQL
                 environments, MySQL Server supports aliases for many
                 functions. For example, all string functions support
                 both standard SQL syntax and ODBC syntax.
@@ -1108,17 +1126,19 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Use of <literal>COUNT(DISTINCT list)</literal> where
-                <literal>list</literal> has more than one element.
+                Use of <literal>COUNT(DISTINCT
+                <replaceable>value_list</replaceable>)</literal> where
+                <replaceable>value_list</replaceable> has more than one
+                element.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                All string comparisons are case-insensitive by default,
-                with sort ordering determined by the current character
-                set (cp1252 Latin1 by default). If you don't like this,
-                you should declare your columns with the
+                String comparisons are case-insensitive by default, with
+                sort ordering determined by the current character set
+                (cp1252 Latin1 by default). If you don't like this, you
+                should declare your columns with the
                 <literal>BINARY</literal> attribute or use the
                 <literal>BINARY</literal> cast, which causes comparisons
                 to be done using the underlying character code values
@@ -1138,11 +1158,12 @@
             <listitem>
               <para>
                 The <literal>%</literal> operator is a synonym for
-                <literal>MOD()</literal>. That is, <literal>N %
-                M</literal> is equivalent to
-                <literal>MOD(N,M)</literal>. <literal>%</literal> is
-                supported for C programmers and for compatibility with
-                PostgreSQL.
+                <literal>MOD()</literal>. That is,
+                <literal><replaceable>N</replaceable> %
+                <replaceable>M</replaceable></literal> is equivalent to
+                <literal>MOD(<replaceable>N</replaceable>,<replaceable>M</replaceable>)</literal>.
+                <literal>%</literal> is supported for C programmers and
+                for compatibility with PostgreSQL.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1155,28 +1176,27 @@
                 <literal>&gt;&gt;</literal>,
                 <literal>&lt;=&gt;</literal>, <literal>AND</literal>,
                 <literal>OR</literal>, or <literal>LIKE</literal>
-                operators may be used in column comparisons to the left
-                of the <literal>FROM</literal> in
-                <literal>SELECT</literal> statements. For example:
+                operators may be used in expressions in the output
+                column list (to the left of the <literal>FROM</literal>)
+                in <literal>SELECT</literal> statements. For example:
               </para>
 
 <programlisting>
-mysql&gt; <userinput>SELECT col1=1 AND col2=2 FROM <replaceable>tbl_name</replaceable>;</userinput>
+mysql&gt; <userinput>SELECT col1=1 AND col2=2 FROM my_table;</userinput>
 </programlisting>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                The <literal>LAST_INSERT_ID()</literal> function that
-                returns the most recent
-                <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal> value. See
-                <xref linkend="information-functions"/>.
+                The <literal>LAST_INSERT_ID()</literal> function returns
+                the most recent <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal> value.
+                See <xref linkend="information-functions"/>.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                <literal>LIKE</literal> is allowed on numeric columns.
+                <literal>LIKE</literal> is allowed on numeric values.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -1191,7 +1211,7 @@
               <para>
                 <literal>CONCAT()</literal> or <literal>CHAR()</literal>
                 with one argument or more than two arguments. (In MySQL
-                Server, these functions can take any number of
+                Server, these functions can take a variable number of
                 arguments.)
               </para>
             </listitem>
@@ -1267,8 +1287,8 @@
         <listitem>
           <para>
             For <literal>VARCHAR</literal> columns, trailing spaces are
-            removed when the value is stored. (Fixed in MySQL 5.0.3).
-            See <xref linkend="bugs"/>.
+            removed when the value is stored. (This is fixed in MySQL
+            5.0.3). See <xref linkend="bugs"/>.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -1276,8 +1296,8 @@
           <para>
             In some cases, <literal>CHAR</literal> columns are silently
             converted to <literal>VARCHAR</literal> columns when you
-            define a table or alter its structure. (Fixed in MySQL
-            5.0.3). See <xref linkend="silent-column-changes"/>.
+            define a table or alter its structure. (This is fixed in
+            MySQL 5.0.3). See <xref linkend="silent-column-changes"/>.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 

Thread
svn commit - mysqldoc@docsrva: r683 - in trunk: . refman-4.1 refman-5.0 refman-5.1paul5 Jan