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From:paul Date:January 31 2006 9:41pm
Subject:svn commit - mysqldoc@docsrva: r1154 - in trunk: . refman-4.1 refman-5.0 refman-5.1 refman-common
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Author: paul
Date: 2006-01-31 22:41:05 +0100 (Tue, 31 Jan 2006)
New Revision: 1154

Log:
 r2749@kite-hub:  paul | 2006-01-31 15:40:55 -0600
 General revisions.


Modified:
   trunk/
   trunk/refman-4.1/ndbcluster.xml
   trunk/refman-5.0/ndbcluster.xml
   trunk/refman-5.1/ndbcluster.xml
   trunk/refman-common/titles.en.ent


Property changes on: trunk
___________________________________________________________________
Name: svk:merge
   - b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:6975
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:2747
   + b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:6975
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:2749

Modified: trunk/refman-4.1/ndbcluster.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-4.1/ndbcluster.xml	2006-01-31 20:55:32 UTC (rev 1153)
+++ trunk/refman-4.1/ndbcluster.xml	2006-01-31 21:41:05 UTC (rev 1154)
@@ -30,8 +30,8 @@
     several MySQL servers in a cluster. This storage engine is available
     and in binary releases from MySQL-Max 4.1.3. Beginning with MySQL
     4.1.10a, it is also available in RPMs compatible with most modern
-    Linux distributions. (Note that both the
-    <literal>mysql-server</literal> and <literal>mysql-max</literal>
+    Linux distributions. (If you install using RPM files, note that both
+    the <literal>mysql-server</literal> and <literal>mysql-max</literal>
     RPMs must be installed to have MySQL Cluster capability.)
   </para>
 
@@ -95,7 +95,7 @@
     <title>&title-mysql-cluster-overview;</title>
 
     <para>
-      <firstterm>MySQL Cluster</firstterm> is a technology which enables
+      <firstterm>MySQL Cluster</firstterm> is a technology that enables
       clustering of in-memory databases in a share-nothing system. The
       share-nothing architecture allows the system to work with very
       inexpensive hardware, and without any specific requirements on
@@ -131,12 +131,12 @@
 
     <para>
       All these programs work together to form a MySQL Cluster. When
-      data is stored in the NDB Cluster storage engine, the tables are
-      stored in the data nodes. Such tables are directly accessible from
-      all other MySQL servers in the cluster. Thus, in a payroll
-      application storing data in a cluster, if one application updates
-      the salary of an employee, all other MySQL servers that query this
-      data can see this change immediately.
+      data is stored in the <literal>NDB Cluster</literal> storage
+      engine, the tables are stored in the data nodes. Such tables are
+      directly accessible from all other MySQL servers in the cluster.
+      Thus, in a payroll application storing data in a cluster, if one
+      application updates the salary of an employee, all other MySQL
+      servers that query this data can see this change immediately.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -149,7 +149,7 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      By bringing MySQL Cluster to the Open Source world, MySQL makes
+      By bringing MySQL Cluster to the Open Source world, MySQL AB makes
       clustered data management with high availability, high
       performance, and scalability available to all who need it.
     </para>
@@ -189,6 +189,11 @@
       data within the cluster itself.
     </para>
 
+    <remark role="todo">
+      [pd] Actually, this section does not show how to set up. That
+      seems a comment more applicable to following sections.
+    </remark>
+
     <para>
       We will now describe how to set up a MySQL Cluster consisting of
       an NDB storage engine and some MySQL servers.
@@ -219,14 +224,14 @@
 
       <listitem>
         <para>
-          The management (<literal>MGM</literal>) node: The role of this
-          type of node is to manage the other nodes within the MySQL
-          Cluster, such as providing configuration data, starting and
-          stopping nodes, running backup, and so forth. Because this
-          node type manages the configuration of the other nodes, a node
-          of this type should be started first, before any other node.
-          An MGM node is started with the command
-          <command>ndb_mgmd</command>.
+          The <emphasis role="bold">management node</emphasis> (MGM
+          node): The role of this type of node is to manage the other
+          nodes within the MySQL Cluster, such as providing
+          configuration data, starting and stopping nodes, running
+          backup, and so forth. Because this node type manages the
+          configuration of the other nodes, a node of this type should
+          be started first, before any other node. An MGM node is
+          started with the command <command>ndb_mgmd</command>.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -247,8 +252,8 @@
           The <emphasis role="bold">SQL node</emphasis>: This is the
           node that accesses the cluster data. In the case of MySQL
           Cluster, a client node is a traditional MySQL server that uses
-          the NDB Cluster storage engine. An SQL node is typically
-          started with the command <command>mysqld
+          the <literal>NDB Cluster</literal> storage engine. An SQL node
+          is typically started with the command <command>mysqld
           --ndbcluster</command> or simply by using
           <command>mysqld</command> with <literal>ndbcluster</literal>
           added to <filename>my.cnf</filename>.
@@ -540,9 +545,9 @@
     </remark>
 
     <para>
-      This section is a <quote>How-To</quote> in which we describe the
-      basics for how to plan, install, configure, and run a MySQL
-      Cluster. Unlike the example in
+      This section is a <quote>How-To</quote> that describes the basics
+      for how to plan, install, configure, and run a MySQL Cluster.
+      Unlike the example in
       <xref linkend="mysql-cluster-configuration"/>, the result of
       following the guidelines and procedures outlined here should be a
       usable MySQL Cluster which meets minimum requirements for
@@ -550,10 +555,10 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      In this section, we will cover hardware and software requirements;
-      networking issues; installation of MySQL Cluster; configuration
-      issues; starting, stopping, and restarting the cluster; loading of
-      a sample database; and performing queries.
+      This section covers hardware and software requirements; networking
+      issues; installation of MySQL Cluster; configuration issues;
+      starting, stopping, and restarting the cluster; loading of a
+      sample database; and performing queries.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -568,9 +573,9 @@
 
       <listitem>
         <para>
-          We are setting up our cluster with 4 nodes, each on a separate
-          host, and each with a fixed network address on a typical
-          Ethernet as shown here:
+          The cluster setup has four nodes, each on a separate host, and
+          each with a fixed network address on a typical Ethernet as
+          shown here:
         </para>
 
         <informaltable>
@@ -618,12 +623,11 @@
 
         <para>
           <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: In the interest of
-          simplicity (and reliability), we will use only numeric IP
-          addresses in this How-To. However, if DNS resolution is
-          available on your network, then it is possible to use
-          hostnames in lieu of IP addresses in configuring Cluster.
-          Alternatively, you can also use the
-          <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> file or your operating
+          simplicity (and reliability), this How-To uses only numeric IP
+          addresses. However, if DNS resolution is available on your
+          network, then it is possible to use hostnames in lieu of IP
+          addresses in configuring Cluster. Alternatively, you can also
+          use the <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> file or your operating
           system's equivalent for providing a means to do host lookup if
           such is available.
         </para>
@@ -646,21 +650,21 @@
         <para>
           Standard 100 Mbps or 1 gigabit Ethernet cards are installed on
           each machine, along with the proper drivers for the cards, and
-          that all 4 hosts are connected via a standard-issue Ethernet
-          networking appliance such as a switch. (All machines should
-          use network cards with the same throughout; that is, all 4
-          machines in the cluster should have 100 Mbps cards
-          <emphasis>or</emphasis> all 4 machines should have 1 Gbps
+          that all four hosts are connected via a standard-issue
+          Ethernet networking appliance such as a switch. (All machines
+          should use network cards with the same throughout; that is,
+          all four machines in the cluster should have 100 Mbps cards
+          <emphasis>or</emphasis> all four machines should have 1 Gbps
           cards.) MySQL Cluster will work in a 100 Mbps network;
           however, gigabit Ethernet will provide better performance.
         </para>
 
         <para>
           Note that MySQL Cluster is <emphasis>not</emphasis> intended
-          for use in a network whose connectivity is less than 100 Mbps.
-          For this reason (among others), attempting to run a MySQL
-          Cluster over a public network such as the Internet is not
-          likely to be successful, and is not recommended.
+          for use in a network for which throughput is less than 100
+          Mbps. For this reason (among others), attempting to run a
+          MySQL Cluster over a public network such as the Internet is
+          not likely to be successful, and is not recommended.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -759,16 +763,16 @@
         <listitem>
           <para>
             <emphasis role="bold">Efficiency</emphasis>: Setting up a
-            MySQL Cluster on a private or protected network allows for
-            the cluster to make exclusive use of bandwidth between
-            cluster hosts. Using a separate switch for your MySQL
-            Cluster not only helps protect against unauthorized access
-            to Cluster data, it also ensures that Cluster nodes are
-            shielded from interference caused by transmissions between
-            other computers on the network. For enhanced reliability,
-            you can use dual switches and dual cards to remove the
-            network as a single point of failure; many device drivers
-            support failover for such communication links.
+            MySQL Cluster on a private or protected network allows the
+            cluster to make exclusive use of bandwidth between cluster
+            hosts. Using a separate switch for your MySQL Cluster not
+            only helps protect against unauthorized access to Cluster
+            data, it also ensures that Cluster nodes are shielded from
+            interference caused by transmissions between other computers
+            on the network. For enhanced reliability, you can use dual
+            switches and dual cards to remove the network as a single
+            point of failure; many device drivers support failover for
+            such communication links.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -793,9 +797,9 @@
         nodes, it is not necessary to install the MySQL server binary,
         but you do have to install the MGM server daemon and client
         binaries (<command>ndb_mgmd</command> and
-        <command>ndb_mgm</command>, respectively). In this section, we
-        will cover the steps necessary to install the correct binaries
-        for each type of Cluster node.
+        <command>ndb_mgm</command>, respectively). This section covers
+        the steps necessary to install the correct binaries for each
+        type of Cluster node.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -1768,9 +1772,9 @@
 
       <para>
         <literal>NDB</literal>, the Cluster storage engine, is available
-        in binary distributions for Linux, Mac OS X, and Solaris. It is
-        not yet supported on Windows, but we intend to make it available
-        for win32 and other platforms in the near future.
+        in binary distributions for Linux, Mac OS X, and Solaris. We are
+        working to make Cluster run on all operating systems supported
+        by MySQL, including Windows.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -8873,12 +8877,13 @@
       <para>
         In our tests, we ran the base benchmarks for both a normal
         transporter using TCP/IP sockets and a similar setup using SCI
-        sockets. The figures reported below are for small accesses of 20
-        records per access. The difference between serial and batched
-        access decreases by a factor of 3 to 4 when using 2KB records
-        instead. SCI Sockets were not tested with 2KB records. Tests
-        were performed on a cluster with 2 data nodes running on 2
-        dual-CPU machines equipped with AMD MP1900+ processors.
+        sockets. The figures reported in the following table are for
+        small accesses of 20 records per access. The difference between
+        serial and batched access decreases by a factor of 3 to 4 when
+        using 2KB records instead. SCI Sockets were not tested with 2KB
+        records. Tests were performed on a cluster with 2 data nodes
+        running on 2 dual-CPU machines equipped with AMD MP1900+
+        processors.
       </para>
 
       <informaltable>

Modified: trunk/refman-5.0/ndbcluster.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.0/ndbcluster.xml	2006-01-31 20:55:32 UTC (rev 1153)
+++ trunk/refman-5.0/ndbcluster.xml	2006-01-31 21:41:05 UTC (rev 1154)
@@ -29,9 +29,10 @@
     <literal>NDB Cluster</literal> storage engine to enable running
     several MySQL servers in a cluster. This storage engine is available
     in MySQL &current-series; binary releases and in RPMs compatible
-    with most modern Linux distributions. (Note that both the
-    <literal>mysql-server</literal> and <literal>mysql-max</literal>
-    RPMs must be installed to have MySQL Cluster capability.)
+    with most modern Linux distributions. (If you install using RPM
+    files, note that both the <literal>mysql-server</literal> and
+    <literal>mysql-max</literal> RPMs must be installed to have MySQL
+    Cluster capability.)
   </para>
 
   <para>
@@ -94,7 +95,7 @@
     <title>&title-mysql-cluster-overview;</title>
 
     <para>
-      <firstterm>MySQL Cluster</firstterm> is a technology which enables
+      <firstterm>MySQL Cluster</firstterm> is a technology that enables
       clustering of in-memory databases in a share-nothing system. The
       share-nothing architecture allows the system to work with very
       inexpensive hardware, and without any specific requirements on
@@ -130,12 +131,12 @@
 
     <para>
       All these programs work together to form a MySQL Cluster. When
-      data is stored in the NDB Cluster storage engine, the tables are
-      stored in the data nodes. Such tables are directly accessible from
-      all other MySQL servers in the cluster. Thus, in a payroll
-      application storing data in a cluster, if one application updates
-      the salary of an employee, all other MySQL servers that query this
-      data can see this change immediately.
+      data is stored in the <literal>NDB Cluster</literal> storage
+      engine, the tables are stored in the data nodes. Such tables are
+      directly accessible from all other MySQL servers in the cluster.
+      Thus, in a payroll application storing data in a cluster, if one
+      application updates the salary of an employee, all other MySQL
+      servers that query this data can see this change immediately.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -148,7 +149,7 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      By bringing MySQL Cluster to the Open Source world, MySQL makes
+      By bringing MySQL Cluster to the Open Source world, MySQL AB makes
       clustered data management with high availability, high
       performance, and scalability available to all who need it.
     </para>
@@ -188,6 +189,11 @@
       data within the cluster itself.
     </para>
 
+    <remark role="todo">
+      [pd] Actually, this section does not show how to set up. That
+      seems a comment more applicable to following sections.
+    </remark>
+
     <para>
       We will now describe how to set up a MySQL Cluster consisting of
       an NDB storage engine and some MySQL servers.
@@ -218,14 +224,14 @@
 
       <listitem>
         <para>
-          The management (<literal>MGM</literal>) node: The role of this
-          type of node is to manage the other nodes within the MySQL
-          Cluster, such as providing configuration data, starting and
-          stopping nodes, running backup, and so forth. Because this
-          node type manages the configuration of the other nodes, a node
-          of this type should be started first, before any other node.
-          An MGM node is started with the command
-          <command>ndb_mgmd</command>.
+          The <emphasis role="bold">management node</emphasis> (MGM
+          node): The role of this type of node is to manage the other
+          nodes within the MySQL Cluster, such as providing
+          configuration data, starting and stopping nodes, running
+          backup, and so forth. Because this node type manages the
+          configuration of the other nodes, a node of this type should
+          be started first, before any other node. An MGM node is
+          started with the command <command>ndb_mgmd</command>.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -246,8 +252,8 @@
           The <emphasis role="bold">SQL node</emphasis>: This is the
           node that accesses the cluster data. In the case of MySQL
           Cluster, a client node is a traditional MySQL server that uses
-          the NDB Cluster storage engine. An SQL node is typically
-          started with the command <command>mysqld
+          the <literal>NDB Cluster</literal> storage engine. An SQL node
+          is typically started with the command <command>mysqld
           --ndbcluster</command> or simply by using
           <command>mysqld</command> with <literal>ndbcluster</literal>
           added to <filename>my.cnf</filename>.
@@ -539,9 +545,9 @@
     </remark>
 
     <para>
-      This section is a <quote>How-To</quote> in which we describe the
-      basics for how to plan, install, configure, and run a MySQL
-      Cluster. Unlike the example in
+      This section is a <quote>How-To</quote> that describes the basics
+      for how to plan, install, configure, and run a MySQL Cluster.
+      Unlike the example in
       <xref linkend="mysql-cluster-configuration"/>, the result of
       following the guidelines and procedures outlined here should be a
       usable MySQL Cluster which meets minimum requirements for
@@ -549,10 +555,10 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      In this section, we will cover hardware and software requirements;
-      networking issues; installation of MySQL Cluster; configuration
-      issues; starting, stopping, and restarting the cluster; loading of
-      a sample database; and performing queries.
+      This section covers hardware and software requirements; networking
+      issues; installation of MySQL Cluster; configuration issues;
+      starting, stopping, and restarting the cluster; loading of a
+      sample database; and performing queries.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -567,9 +573,9 @@
 
       <listitem>
         <para>
-          We are setting up our cluster with 4 nodes, each on a separate
-          host, and each with a fixed network address on a typical
-          Ethernet as shown here:
+          The cluster setup has four nodes, each on a separate host, and
+          each with a fixed network address on a typical Ethernet as
+          shown here:
         </para>
 
         <informaltable>
@@ -617,12 +623,11 @@
 
         <para>
           <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: In the interest of
-          simplicity (and reliability), we will use only numeric IP
-          addresses in this How-To. However, if DNS resolution is
-          available on your network, then it is possible to use
-          hostnames in lieu of IP addresses in configuring Cluster.
-          Alternatively, you can also use the
-          <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> file or your operating
+          simplicity (and reliability), this How-To uses only numeric IP
+          addresses. However, if DNS resolution is available on your
+          network, then it is possible to use hostnames in lieu of IP
+          addresses in configuring Cluster. Alternatively, you can also
+          use the <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> file or your operating
           system's equivalent for providing a means to do host lookup if
           such is available.
         </para>
@@ -645,21 +650,21 @@
         <para>
           Standard 100 Mbps or 1 gigabit Ethernet cards are installed on
           each machine, along with the proper drivers for the cards, and
-          that all 4 hosts are connected via a standard-issue Ethernet
-          networking appliance such as a switch. (All machines should
-          use network cards with the same throughout; that is, all 4
-          machines in the cluster should have 100 Mbps cards
-          <emphasis>or</emphasis> all 4 machines should have 1 Gbps
+          that all four hosts are connected via a standard-issue
+          Ethernet networking appliance such as a switch. (All machines
+          should use network cards with the same throughout; that is,
+          all four machines in the cluster should have 100 Mbps cards
+          <emphasis>or</emphasis> all four machines should have 1 Gbps
           cards.) MySQL Cluster will work in a 100 Mbps network;
           however, gigabit Ethernet will provide better performance.
         </para>
 
         <para>
           Note that MySQL Cluster is <emphasis>not</emphasis> intended
-          for use in a network whose connectivity is less than 100 Mbps.
-          For this reason (among others), attempting to run a MySQL
-          Cluster over a public network such as the Internet is not
-          likely to be successful, and is not recommended.
+          for use in a network for which throughput is less than 100
+          Mbps. For this reason (among others), attempting to run a
+          MySQL Cluster over a public network such as the Internet is
+          not likely to be successful, and is not recommended.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -758,16 +763,16 @@
         <listitem>
           <para>
             <emphasis role="bold">Efficiency</emphasis>: Setting up a
-            MySQL Cluster on a private or protected network allows for
-            the cluster to make exclusive use of bandwidth between
-            cluster hosts. Using a separate switch for your MySQL
-            Cluster not only helps protect against unauthorized access
-            to Cluster data, it also ensures that Cluster nodes are
-            shielded from interference caused by transmissions between
-            other computers on the network. For enhanced reliability,
-            you can use dual switches and dual cards to remove the
-            network as a single point of failure; many device drivers
-            support failover for such communication links.
+            MySQL Cluster on a private or protected network allows the
+            cluster to make exclusive use of bandwidth between cluster
+            hosts. Using a separate switch for your MySQL Cluster not
+            only helps protect against unauthorized access to Cluster
+            data, it also ensures that Cluster nodes are shielded from
+            interference caused by transmissions between other computers
+            on the network. For enhanced reliability, you can use dual
+            switches and dual cards to remove the network as a single
+            point of failure; many device drivers support failover for
+            such communication links.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -792,9 +797,9 @@
         nodes, it is not necessary to install the MySQL server binary,
         but you do have to install the MGM server daemon and client
         binaries (<command>ndb_mgmd</command> and
-        <command>ndb_mgm</command>, respectively). In this section, we
-        will cover the steps necessary to install the correct binaries
-        for each type of Cluster node.
+        <command>ndb_mgm</command>, respectively). This section covers
+        the steps necessary to install the correct binaries for each
+        type of Cluster node.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -1770,9 +1775,9 @@
 
       <para>
         <literal>NDB</literal>, the Cluster storage engine, is available
-        in binary distributions for Linux, Mac OS X, and Solaris. It is
-        not yet supported on Windows, but we intend to make it available
-        for win32 and other platforms in the near future.
+        in binary distributions for Linux, Mac OS X, and Solaris. We are
+        working to make Cluster run on all operating systems supported
+        by MySQL, including Windows.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -8846,12 +8851,13 @@
       <para>
         In our tests, we ran the base benchmarks for both a normal
         transporter using TCP/IP sockets and a similar setup using SCI
-        sockets. The figures reported below are for small accesses of 20
-        records per access. The difference between serial and batched
-        access decreases by a factor of 3 to 4 when using 2KB records
-        instead. SCI Sockets were not tested with 2KB records. Tests
-        were performed on a cluster with 2 data nodes running on 2
-        dual-CPU machines equipped with AMD MP1900+ processors.
+        sockets. The figures reported in the following table are for
+        small accesses of 20 records per access. The difference between
+        serial and batched access decreases by a factor of 3 to 4 when
+        using 2KB records instead. SCI Sockets were not tested with 2KB
+        records. Tests were performed on a cluster with 2 data nodes
+        running on 2 dual-CPU machines equipped with AMD MP1900+
+        processors.
       </para>
 
       <informaltable>

Modified: trunk/refman-5.1/ndbcluster.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.1/ndbcluster.xml	2006-01-31 20:55:32 UTC (rev 1153)
+++ trunk/refman-5.1/ndbcluster.xml	2006-01-31 21:41:05 UTC (rev 1154)
@@ -29,9 +29,10 @@
     <literal>NDB Cluster</literal> storage engine to enable running
     several MySQL servers in a cluster. This storage engine is available
     in MySQL &current-series; binary releases and in RPMs compatible
-    with most modern Linux distributions. (Note that both the
-    <literal>mysql-server</literal> and <literal>mysql-max</literal>
-    RPMs must be installed to have MySQL Cluster capability.)
+    with most modern Linux distributions. (If you install using RPM
+    files, note that both the <literal>mysql-server</literal> and
+    <literal>mysql-max</literal> RPMs must be installed to have MySQL
+    Cluster capability.)
   </para>
 
   <para>
@@ -94,7 +95,7 @@
     <title>&title-mysql-cluster-overview;</title>
 
     <para>
-      <firstterm>MySQL Cluster</firstterm> is a technology which enables
+      <firstterm>MySQL Cluster</firstterm> is a technology that enables
       clustering of in-memory databases in a share-nothing system. The
       share-nothing architecture allows the system to work with very
       inexpensive hardware, and without any specific requirements on
@@ -130,12 +131,12 @@
 
     <para>
       All these programs work together to form a MySQL Cluster. When
-      data is stored in the NDB Cluster storage engine, the tables are
-      stored in the data nodes. Such tables are directly accessible from
-      all other MySQL servers in the cluster. Thus, in a payroll
-      application storing data in a cluster, if one application updates
-      the salary of an employee, all other MySQL servers that query this
-      data can see this change immediately.
+      data is stored in the <literal>NDB Cluster</literal> storage
+      engine, the tables are stored in the data nodes. Such tables are
+      directly accessible from all other MySQL servers in the cluster.
+      Thus, in a payroll application storing data in a cluster, if one
+      application updates the salary of an employee, all other MySQL
+      servers that query this data can see this change immediately.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -148,7 +149,7 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      By bringing MySQL Cluster to the Open Source world, MySQL makes
+      By bringing MySQL Cluster to the Open Source world, MySQL AB makes
       clustered data management with high availability, high
       performance, and scalability available to all who need it.
     </para>
@@ -188,6 +189,11 @@
       data within the cluster itself.
     </para>
 
+    <remark role="todo">
+      [pd] Actually, this section does not show how to set up. That
+      seems a comment more applicable to following sections.
+    </remark>
+
     <para>
       We will now describe how to set up a MySQL Cluster consisting of
       an NDB storage engine and some MySQL servers.
@@ -218,14 +224,14 @@
 
       <listitem>
         <para>
-          The management (<literal>MGM</literal>) node: The role of this
-          type of node is to manage the other nodes within the MySQL
-          Cluster, such as providing configuration data, starting and
-          stopping nodes, running backup, and so forth. Because this
-          node type manages the configuration of the other nodes, a node
-          of this type should be started first, before any other node.
-          An MGM node is started with the command
-          <command>ndb_mgmd</command>.
+          The <emphasis role="bold">management node</emphasis> (MGM
+          node): The role of this type of node is to manage the other
+          nodes within the MySQL Cluster, such as providing
+          configuration data, starting and stopping nodes, running
+          backup, and so forth. Because this node type manages the
+          configuration of the other nodes, a node of this type should
+          be started first, before any other node. An MGM node is
+          started with the command <command>ndb_mgmd</command>.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -246,8 +252,8 @@
           The <emphasis role="bold">SQL node</emphasis>: This is the
           node that accesses the cluster data. In the case of MySQL
           Cluster, a client node is a traditional MySQL server that uses
-          the NDB Cluster storage engine. An SQL node is typically
-          started with the command <command>mysqld
+          the <literal>NDB Cluster</literal> storage engine. An SQL node
+          is typically started with the command <command>mysqld
           --ndbcluster</command> or simply by using
           <command>mysqld</command> with <literal>ndbcluster</literal>
           added to <filename>my.cnf</filename>.
@@ -539,9 +545,9 @@
     </remark>
 
     <para>
-      This section is a <quote>How-To</quote> in which we describe the
-      basics for how to plan, install, configure, and run a MySQL
-      Cluster. Unlike the example in
+      This section is a <quote>How-To</quote> that describes the basics
+      for how to plan, install, configure, and run a MySQL Cluster.
+      Unlike the example in
       <xref linkend="mysql-cluster-configuration"/>, the result of
       following the guidelines and procedures outlined here should be a
       usable MySQL Cluster which meets minimum requirements for
@@ -549,10 +555,10 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      In this section, we will cover hardware and software requirements;
-      networking issues; installation of MySQL Cluster; configuration
-      issues; starting, stopping, and restarting the cluster; loading of
-      a sample database; and performing queries.
+      This section covers hardware and software requirements; networking
+      issues; installation of MySQL Cluster; configuration issues;
+      starting, stopping, and restarting the cluster; loading of a
+      sample database; and performing queries.
     </para>
 
     <para>
@@ -567,9 +573,9 @@
 
       <listitem>
         <para>
-          We are setting up our cluster with 4 nodes, each on a separate
-          host, and each with a fixed network address on a typical
-          Ethernet as shown here:
+          The cluster setup has four nodes, each on a separate host, and
+          each with a fixed network address on a typical Ethernet as
+          shown here:
         </para>
 
         <informaltable>
@@ -617,12 +623,11 @@
 
         <para>
           <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: In the interest of
-          simplicity (and reliability), we will use only numeric IP
-          addresses in this How-To. However, if DNS resolution is
-          available on your network, then it is possible to use
-          hostnames in lieu of IP addresses in configuring Cluster.
-          Alternatively, you can also use the
-          <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> file or your operating
+          simplicity (and reliability), this How-To uses only numeric IP
+          addresses. However, if DNS resolution is available on your
+          network, then it is possible to use hostnames in lieu of IP
+          addresses in configuring Cluster. Alternatively, you can also
+          use the <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> file or your operating
           system's equivalent for providing a means to do host lookup if
           such is available.
         </para>
@@ -645,21 +650,21 @@
         <para>
           Standard 100 Mbps or 1 gigabit Ethernet cards are installed on
           each machine, along with the proper drivers for the cards, and
-          that all 4 hosts are connected via a standard-issue Ethernet
-          networking appliance such as a switch. (All machines should
-          use network cards with the same throughout; that is, all 4
-          machines in the cluster should have 100 Mbps cards
-          <emphasis>or</emphasis> all 4 machines should have 1 Gbps
+          that all four hosts are connected via a standard-issue
+          Ethernet networking appliance such as a switch. (All machines
+          should use network cards with the same throughout; that is,
+          all four machines in the cluster should have 100 Mbps cards
+          <emphasis>or</emphasis> all four machines should have 1 Gbps
           cards.) MySQL Cluster will work in a 100 Mbps network;
           however, gigabit Ethernet will provide better performance.
         </para>
 
         <para>
           Note that MySQL Cluster is <emphasis>not</emphasis> intended
-          for use in a network whose connectivity is less than 100 Mbps.
-          For this reason (among others), attempting to run a MySQL
-          Cluster over a public network such as the Internet is not
-          likely to be successful, and is not recommended.
+          for use in a network for which throughput is less than 100
+          Mbps. For this reason (among others), attempting to run a
+          MySQL Cluster over a public network such as the Internet is
+          not likely to be successful, and is not recommended.
         </para>
       </listitem>
 
@@ -758,16 +763,16 @@
         <listitem>
           <para>
             <emphasis role="bold">Efficiency</emphasis>: Setting up a
-            MySQL Cluster on a private or protected network allows for
-            the cluster to make exclusive use of bandwidth between
-            cluster hosts. Using a separate switch for your MySQL
-            Cluster not only helps protect against unauthorized access
-            to Cluster data, it also ensures that Cluster nodes are
-            shielded from interference caused by transmissions between
-            other computers on the network. For enhanced reliability,
-            you can use dual switches and dual cards to remove the
-            network as a single point of failure; many device drivers
-            support failover for such communication links.
+            MySQL Cluster on a private or protected network allows the
+            cluster to make exclusive use of bandwidth between cluster
+            hosts. Using a separate switch for your MySQL Cluster not
+            only helps protect against unauthorized access to Cluster
+            data, it also ensures that Cluster nodes are shielded from
+            interference caused by transmissions between other computers
+            on the network. For enhanced reliability, you can use dual
+            switches and dual cards to remove the network as a single
+            point of failure; many device drivers support failover for
+            such communication links.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -792,9 +797,9 @@
         nodes, it is not necessary to install the MySQL server binary,
         but you do have to install the MGM server daemon and client
         binaries (<command>ndb_mgmd</command> and
-        <command>ndb_mgm</command>, respectively). In this section, we
-        will cover the steps necessary to install the correct binaries
-        for each type of Cluster node.
+        <command>ndb_mgm</command>, respectively). This section covers
+        the steps necessary to install the correct binaries for each
+        type of Cluster node.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -1768,9 +1773,9 @@
 
       <para>
         <literal>NDB</literal>, the Cluster storage engine, is available
-        in binary distributions for Linux, Mac OS X, and Solaris. It is
-        not yet supported on Windows, but we intend to make it available
-        for win32 and other platforms in the near future.
+        in binary distributions for Linux, Mac OS X, and Solaris. We are
+        working to make Cluster run on all operating systems supported
+        by MySQL, including Windows.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -8917,7 +8922,7 @@
       </orderedlist>    
       
       <para>It is also possible to use two replication channels, in a
-        manner simlar to the procedure described above; the differences
+        manner simlar to the procedure described in the next section; the differences
         between this and using a single replication channel are covered in
         <xref linkend="mysql-cluster-replication-two-channels"/>.
       </para>    
@@ -9321,7 +9326,7 @@
         <listitem>
           <para>
             You can now start the cluster restoration process on the
-            replication slave using the <literal>ndb_restore</literal>
+            replication slave using the <command>ndb_restore</command>
             command for each backup file in turn. For the first of these
             it is necessary to include the <option>-m</option> option in
             order to restore the cluster metadata:
@@ -9335,7 +9340,7 @@
           <para>
             where <replaceable>dir</replaceable> is the path to the
             directory where the backup files have been placed on the
-            replication slave. For the <literal>ndb_restore</literal>
+            replication slave. For the <command>ndb_restore</command>
             commands corresponding to the remaining backup files, the
             <option>-m</option> option should <emphasis>not</emphasis> be
             used.
@@ -10456,12 +10461,13 @@
       <para>
         In our tests, we ran the base benchmarks for both a normal
         transporter using TCP/IP sockets and a similar setup using SCI
-        sockets. The figures reported below are for small accesses of 20
-        records per access. The difference between serial and batched
-        access decreases by a factor of 3 to 4 when using 2KB records
-        instead. SCI Sockets were not tested with 2KB records. Tests
-        were performed on a cluster with 2 data nodes running on 2
-        dual-CPU machines equipped with AMD MP1900+ processors.
+        sockets. The figures reported in the following table are for
+        small accesses of 20 records per access. The difference between
+        serial and batched access decreases by a factor of 3 to 4 when
+        using 2KB records instead. SCI Sockets were not tested with 2KB
+        records. Tests were performed on a cluster with 2 data nodes
+        running on 2 dual-CPU machines equipped with AMD MP1900+
+        processors.
       </para>
 
       <informaltable>

Modified: trunk/refman-common/titles.en.ent
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-common/titles.en.ent	2006-01-31 20:55:32 UTC (rev 1153)
+++ trunk/refman-common/titles.en.ent	2006-01-31 21:41:05 UTC (rev 1154)
@@ -674,10 +674,10 @@
 <!ENTITY title-msvba "MyODBC and Microsoft VBA and ASP">
 <!ENTITY title-multi-byte-characters "Multi-Byte Character Support">
 <!ENTITY title-multi-computer "Simple Multi-Computer How-To">
-<!ENTITY title-multi-config "Configuration">
+<!ENTITY title-multi-config "Multi-Computer Configuration">
 <!ENTITY title-multi-hardware-software-network "Hardware, Software, and Networking">
 <!ENTITY title-multi-initial "Initial Startup">
-<!ENTITY title-multi-install "Installation">
+<!ENTITY title-multi-install "Multi-Computer Installation">
 <!ENTITY title-multi-load-data-queries "Loading Sample Data and Performing Queries">
 <!ENTITY title-multi-shutdown-restart "Safe Shutdown and Restart">
 <!ENTITY title-multilinestring-property-functions "<literal>MultiLineString</literal> Functions">

Thread
svn commit - mysqldoc@docsrva: r1154 - in trunk: . refman-4.1 refman-5.0 refman-5.1 refman-commonpaul31 Jan