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From:paul Date:January 29 2006 2:17pm
Subject:svn commit - mysqldoc@docsrva: r1103 - in trunk: . refman-4.1 refman-5.0 refman-5.1
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Author: paul
Date: 2006-01-29 15:17:35 +0100 (Sun, 29 Jan 2006)
New Revision: 1103

Log:
 r6855@frost:  paul | 2006-01-29 07:50:25 -0600
 Swap sections.


Modified:
   trunk/
   trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml
   trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml
   trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml


Property changes on: trunk
___________________________________________________________________
Name: svk:merge
   - b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:6852
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:2588
   + b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:6855
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:2588

Modified: trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-29 14:16:38 UTC (rev 1102)
+++ trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-29 14:17:35 UTC (rev 1103)
@@ -17813,140 +17813,6 @@
 
       </section>
 
-      <section id="maintenance-schedule">
-
-        <title>&title-maintenance-schedule;</title>
-
-        <indexterm>
-          <primary>maintaining</primary>
-          <secondary>tables</secondary>
-        </indexterm>
-
-        <indexterm>
-          <primary>tables</primary>
-          <secondary>maintenance regimen</secondary>
-        </indexterm>
-
-        <para>
-          It is a good idea to perform table checks on a regular basis
-          rather than waiting for problems to occur. One way to check
-          and repair <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables is with the
-          <literal>CHECK TABLE</literal> and <literal>REPAIR
-          TABLE</literal> statements. These are available starting with
-          MySQL 3.23.16. See <xref linkend="check-table"/>, and
-          <xref linkend="repair-table"/>.
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          Another way to check tables is to use
-          <command>myisamchk</command>. For maintenance purposes, you
-          can use <command>myisamchk -s</command>. The
-          <option>-s</option> option (short for
-          <option>--silent</option>) causes <command>myisamchk</command>
-          to run in silent mode, printing messages only when errors
-          occur.
-        </para>
-
-        <indexterm type="type">
-          <primary>.pid (process ID) file</primary>
-        </indexterm>
-
-        <para>
-          It is also a good idea to check tables when the server starts.
-          For example, whenever the machine has done a restart in the
-          middle of an update, you usually need to check all the tables
-          that could have been affected. (These are
-          <quote>expected</quote> crashed tables.) To check
-          <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables automatically, start the
-          server with the <option>--myisam-recover</option> option,
-          available as of MySQL 3.23.25. If your server is too old to
-          support this option, you could add a test to
-          <command>mysqld_safe</command> that runs
-          <command>myisamchk</command> to check all tables that have
-          been modified during the last 24 hours if there is an old
-          <filename>.pid</filename> (process ID) file left after a
-          restart. (The <filename>.pid</filename> file is created by
-          <command>mysqld</command> when it starts and removed when it
-          terminates normally. The presence of a
-          <filename>.pid</filename> file at system startup time
-          indicates that <command>mysqld</command> terminated
-          abnormally.)
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          An even better test would be to check any table that has a
-          last-modified time more recent than that of the
-          <filename>.pid</filename> file.
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          You should also check your tables regularly during normal
-          system operation. At MySQL AB, we run a
-          <command>cron</command> job to check all our important tables
-          once a week, using a line like this in a
-          <filename>crontab</filename> file:
-        </para>
-
-<programlisting>
-35 0 * * 0 <replaceable>/path/to/myisamchk</replaceable> --fast --silent <replaceable>/path/to/datadir/</replaceable>*/*.MYI
-</programlisting>
-
-        <para>
-          This prints out information about crashed tables so that we
-          can examine and repair them when needed.
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          Because we have not had any unexpectedly crashed tables
-          (tables that become corrupted for reasons other than hardware
-          trouble) for several years, once a week is more than
-          sufficient for us.
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          We recommend that to start with, you execute
-          <command>myisamchk -s</command> each night on all tables that
-          have been updated during the last 24 hours, until you come to
-          trust MySQL as much as we do.
-        </para>
-
-        <indexterm>
-          <primary>tables</primary>
-          <secondary>defragment</secondary>
-        </indexterm>
-
-        <para>
-          Normally, MySQL tables need little maintenance. If you are
-          changing <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables with dynamic-sized
-          rows (tables with <literal>VARCHAR</literal>,
-          <literal>BLOB</literal>, or <literal>TEXT</literal> columns)
-          or have tables with many deleted rows you may want to
-          defragment/reclaim space from the tables from time to time
-          (once a month?).
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          You can do this by using <literal>OPTIMIZE TABLE</literal> on
-          the tables in question. Or, if you can stop the
-          <command>mysqld</command> server for a while, change location
-          into the data directory and use this command while the server
-          is stopped:
-        </para>
-
-<programlisting>
-shell&gt; <userinput>myisamchk -r -s --sort-index --sort_buffer_size=16M */*.MYI</userinput>
-</programlisting>
-
-        <para>
-          For <literal>ISAM</literal> tables, the command is similar:
-        </para>
-
-<programlisting>
-shell&gt; <userinput>isamchk -r -s --sort-index -O sort_buffer_size=16M */*.ISM</userinput>
-</programlisting>
-
-      </section>
-
       <section id="table-info">
 
         <title>&title-table-info;</title>
@@ -18658,6 +18524,140 @@
 
       </section>
 
+      <section id="maintenance-schedule">
+
+        <title>&title-maintenance-schedule;</title>
+
+        <indexterm>
+          <primary>maintaining</primary>
+          <secondary>tables</secondary>
+        </indexterm>
+
+        <indexterm>
+          <primary>tables</primary>
+          <secondary>maintenance regimen</secondary>
+        </indexterm>
+
+        <para>
+          It is a good idea to perform table checks on a regular basis
+          rather than waiting for problems to occur. One way to check
+          and repair <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables is with the
+          <literal>CHECK TABLE</literal> and <literal>REPAIR
+          TABLE</literal> statements. These are available starting with
+          MySQL 3.23.16. See <xref linkend="check-table"/>, and
+          <xref linkend="repair-table"/>.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          Another way to check tables is to use
+          <command>myisamchk</command>. For maintenance purposes, you
+          can use <command>myisamchk -s</command>. The
+          <option>-s</option> option (short for
+          <option>--silent</option>) causes <command>myisamchk</command>
+          to run in silent mode, printing messages only when errors
+          occur.
+        </para>
+
+        <indexterm type="type">
+          <primary>.pid (process ID) file</primary>
+        </indexterm>
+
+        <para>
+          It is also a good idea to check tables when the server starts.
+          For example, whenever the machine has done a restart in the
+          middle of an update, you usually need to check all the tables
+          that could have been affected. (These are
+          <quote>expected</quote> crashed tables.) To check
+          <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables automatically, start the
+          server with the <option>--myisam-recover</option> option,
+          available as of MySQL 3.23.25. If your server is too old to
+          support this option, you could add a test to
+          <command>mysqld_safe</command> that runs
+          <command>myisamchk</command> to check all tables that have
+          been modified during the last 24 hours if there is an old
+          <filename>.pid</filename> (process ID) file left after a
+          restart. (The <filename>.pid</filename> file is created by
+          <command>mysqld</command> when it starts and removed when it
+          terminates normally. The presence of a
+          <filename>.pid</filename> file at system startup time
+          indicates that <command>mysqld</command> terminated
+          abnormally.)
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          An even better test would be to check any table that has a
+          last-modified time more recent than that of the
+          <filename>.pid</filename> file.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          You should also check your tables regularly during normal
+          system operation. At MySQL AB, we run a
+          <command>cron</command> job to check all our important tables
+          once a week, using a line like this in a
+          <filename>crontab</filename> file:
+        </para>
+
+<programlisting>
+35 0 * * 0 <replaceable>/path/to/myisamchk</replaceable> --fast --silent <replaceable>/path/to/datadir/</replaceable>*/*.MYI
+</programlisting>
+
+        <para>
+          This prints out information about crashed tables so that we
+          can examine and repair them when needed.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          Because we have not had any unexpectedly crashed tables
+          (tables that become corrupted for reasons other than hardware
+          trouble) for several years, once a week is more than
+          sufficient for us.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          We recommend that to start with, you execute
+          <command>myisamchk -s</command> each night on all tables that
+          have been updated during the last 24 hours, until you come to
+          trust MySQL as much as we do.
+        </para>
+
+        <indexterm>
+          <primary>tables</primary>
+          <secondary>defragment</secondary>
+        </indexterm>
+
+        <para>
+          Normally, MySQL tables need little maintenance. If you are
+          changing <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables with dynamic-sized
+          rows (tables with <literal>VARCHAR</literal>,
+          <literal>BLOB</literal>, or <literal>TEXT</literal> columns)
+          or have tables with many deleted rows you may want to
+          defragment/reclaim space from the tables from time to time
+          (once a month?).
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          You can do this by using <literal>OPTIMIZE TABLE</literal> on
+          the tables in question. Or, if you can stop the
+          <command>mysqld</command> server for a while, change location
+          into the data directory and use this command while the server
+          is stopped:
+        </para>
+
+<programlisting>
+shell&gt; <userinput>myisamchk -r -s --sort-index --sort_buffer_size=16M */*.MYI</userinput>
+</programlisting>
+
+        <para>
+          For <literal>ISAM</literal> tables, the command is similar:
+        </para>
+
+<programlisting>
+shell&gt; <userinput>isamchk -r -s --sort-index -O sort_buffer_size=16M */*.ISM</userinput>
+</programlisting>
+
+      </section>
+
     </section>
 
   </section>

Modified: trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml	2006-01-29 14:16:38 UTC (rev 1102)
+++ trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml	2006-01-29 14:17:35 UTC (rev 1103)
@@ -20046,119 +20046,6 @@
 
       </section>
 
-      <section id="maintenance-schedule">
-
-        <title>&title-maintenance-schedule;</title>
-
-        <indexterm>
-          <primary>maintaining</primary>
-          <secondary>tables</secondary>
-        </indexterm>
-
-        <indexterm>
-          <primary>tables</primary>
-          <secondary>maintenance regimen</secondary>
-        </indexterm>
-
-        <para>
-          It is a good idea to perform table checks on a regular basis
-          rather than waiting for problems to occur. One way to check
-          and repair <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables is with the
-          <literal>CHECK TABLE</literal> and <literal>REPAIR
-          TABLE</literal> statements. See <xref linkend="check-table"/>,
-          and <xref linkend="repair-table"/>.
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          Another way to check tables is to use
-          <command>myisamchk</command>. For maintenance purposes, you
-          can use <command>myisamchk -s</command>. The
-          <option>-s</option> option (short for
-          <option>--silent</option>) causes <command>myisamchk</command>
-          to run in silent mode, printing messages only when errors
-          occur.
-        </para>
-
-        <indexterm type="type">
-          <primary>.pid (process ID) file</primary>
-        </indexterm>
-
-        <para>
-          It is also a good idea to check tables when the server starts.
-          For example, whenever the machine has done a restart in the
-          middle of an update, you usually need to check all the tables
-          that could have been affected. (These are <quote>expected
-          crashed tables.</quote>) To check <literal>MyISAM</literal>
-          tables automatically, start the server with the
-          <option>--myisam-recover</option> option.
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          An even better test would be to check any table that has a
-          last-modified time more recent than that of the
-          <filename>.pid</filename> file.
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          You should also check your tables regularly during normal
-          system operation. At MySQL AB, we run a
-          <command>cron</command> job to check all our important tables
-          once a week, using a line like this in a
-          <filename>crontab</filename> file:
-        </para>
-
-<programlisting>
-35 0 * * 0 <replaceable>/path/to/myisamchk</replaceable> --fast --silent <replaceable>/path/to/datadir</replaceable>/*/*.MYI
-</programlisting>
-
-        <para>
-          This prints out information about crashed tables so that we
-          can examine and repair them when needed.
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          Because we have not had any unexpectedly crashed tables
-          (tables that become corrupted for reasons other than hardware
-          trouble) for several years, once a week is more than
-          sufficient for us.
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          We recommend that to start with, you execute
-          <command>myisamchk -s</command> each night on all tables that
-          have been updated during the last 24 hours, until you come to
-          trust MySQL as much as we do.
-        </para>
-
-        <indexterm>
-          <primary>tables</primary>
-          <secondary>defragment</secondary>
-        </indexterm>
-
-        <para>
-          Normally, MySQL tables need little maintenance. If you are
-          changing <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables with dynamic-sized
-          rows (tables with <literal>VARCHAR</literal>,
-          <literal>BLOB</literal>, or <literal>TEXT</literal> columns)
-          or have tables with many deleted rows you may want to
-          defragment/reclaim space from the tables from time to time
-          (once a month?).
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          You can do this by using <literal>OPTIMIZE TABLE</literal> on
-          the tables in question. Or, if you can stop the
-          <command>mysqld</command> server for a while, change location
-          into the data directory and use this command while the server
-          is stopped:
-        </para>
-
-<programlisting>
-shell&gt; <userinput>myisamchk -r -s --sort-index --sort_buffer_size=16M */*.MYI</userinput>
-</programlisting>
-
-      </section>
-
       <section id="table-info">
 
         <title>&title-table-info;</title>
@@ -20874,6 +20761,119 @@
 
       </section>
 
+      <section id="maintenance-schedule">
+
+        <title>&title-maintenance-schedule;</title>
+
+        <indexterm>
+          <primary>maintaining</primary>
+          <secondary>tables</secondary>
+        </indexterm>
+
+        <indexterm>
+          <primary>tables</primary>
+          <secondary>maintenance regimen</secondary>
+        </indexterm>
+
+        <para>
+          It is a good idea to perform table checks on a regular basis
+          rather than waiting for problems to occur. One way to check
+          and repair <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables is with the
+          <literal>CHECK TABLE</literal> and <literal>REPAIR
+          TABLE</literal> statements. See <xref linkend="check-table"/>,
+          and <xref linkend="repair-table"/>.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          Another way to check tables is to use
+          <command>myisamchk</command>. For maintenance purposes, you
+          can use <command>myisamchk -s</command>. The
+          <option>-s</option> option (short for
+          <option>--silent</option>) causes <command>myisamchk</command>
+          to run in silent mode, printing messages only when errors
+          occur.
+        </para>
+
+        <indexterm type="type">
+          <primary>.pid (process ID) file</primary>
+        </indexterm>
+
+        <para>
+          It is also a good idea to check tables when the server starts.
+          For example, whenever the machine has done a restart in the
+          middle of an update, you usually need to check all the tables
+          that could have been affected. (These are <quote>expected
+          crashed tables.</quote>) To check <literal>MyISAM</literal>
+          tables automatically, start the server with the
+          <option>--myisam-recover</option> option.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          An even better test would be to check any table that has a
+          last-modified time more recent than that of the
+          <filename>.pid</filename> file.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          You should also check your tables regularly during normal
+          system operation. At MySQL AB, we run a
+          <command>cron</command> job to check all our important tables
+          once a week, using a line like this in a
+          <filename>crontab</filename> file:
+        </para>
+
+<programlisting>
+35 0 * * 0 <replaceable>/path/to/myisamchk</replaceable> --fast --silent <replaceable>/path/to/datadir</replaceable>/*/*.MYI
+</programlisting>
+
+        <para>
+          This prints out information about crashed tables so that we
+          can examine and repair them when needed.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          Because we have not had any unexpectedly crashed tables
+          (tables that become corrupted for reasons other than hardware
+          trouble) for several years, once a week is more than
+          sufficient for us.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          We recommend that to start with, you execute
+          <command>myisamchk -s</command> each night on all tables that
+          have been updated during the last 24 hours, until you come to
+          trust MySQL as much as we do.
+        </para>
+
+        <indexterm>
+          <primary>tables</primary>
+          <secondary>defragment</secondary>
+        </indexterm>
+
+        <para>
+          Normally, MySQL tables need little maintenance. If you are
+          changing <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables with dynamic-sized
+          rows (tables with <literal>VARCHAR</literal>,
+          <literal>BLOB</literal>, or <literal>TEXT</literal> columns)
+          or have tables with many deleted rows you may want to
+          defragment/reclaim space from the tables from time to time
+          (once a month?).
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          You can do this by using <literal>OPTIMIZE TABLE</literal> on
+          the tables in question. Or, if you can stop the
+          <command>mysqld</command> server for a while, change location
+          into the data directory and use this command while the server
+          is stopped:
+        </para>
+
+<programlisting>
+shell&gt; <userinput>myisamchk -r -s --sort-index --sort_buffer_size=16M */*.MYI</userinput>
+</programlisting>
+
+      </section>
+
     </section>
 
   </section>

Modified: trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-29 14:16:38 UTC (rev 1102)
+++ trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-29 14:17:35 UTC (rev 1103)
@@ -20055,119 +20055,6 @@
 
       </section>
 
-      <section id="maintenance-schedule">
-
-        <title>&title-maintenance-schedule;</title>
-
-        <indexterm>
-          <primary>maintaining</primary>
-          <secondary>tables</secondary>
-        </indexterm>
-
-        <indexterm>
-          <primary>tables</primary>
-          <secondary>maintenance regimen</secondary>
-        </indexterm>
-
-        <para>
-          It is a good idea to perform table checks on a regular basis
-          rather than waiting for problems to occur. One way to check
-          and repair <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables is with the
-          <literal>CHECK TABLE</literal> and <literal>REPAIR
-          TABLE</literal> statements. See <xref linkend="check-table"/>,
-          and <xref linkend="repair-table"/>.
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          Another way to check tables is to use
-          <command>myisamchk</command>. For maintenance purposes, you
-          can use <command>myisamchk -s</command>. The
-          <option>-s</option> option (short for
-          <option>--silent</option>) causes <command>myisamchk</command>
-          to run in silent mode, printing messages only when errors
-          occur.
-        </para>
-
-        <indexterm type="type">
-          <primary>.pid (process ID) file</primary>
-        </indexterm>
-
-        <para>
-          It is also a good idea to check tables when the server starts.
-          For example, whenever the machine has done a restart in the
-          middle of an update, you usually need to check all the tables
-          that could have been affected. (These are <quote>expected
-          crashed tables.</quote>) To check <literal>MyISAM</literal>
-          tables automatically, start the server with the
-          <option>--myisam-recover</option> option.
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          An even better test would be to check any table that has a
-          last-modified time more recent than that of the
-          <filename>.pid</filename> file.
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          You should also check your tables regularly during normal
-          system operation. At MySQL AB, we run a
-          <command>cron</command> job to check all our important tables
-          once a week, using a line like this in a
-          <filename>crontab</filename> file:
-        </para>
-
-<programlisting>
-35 0 * * 0 <replaceable>/path/to/myisamchk</replaceable> --fast --silent <replaceable>/path/to/datadir</replaceable>/*/*.MYI
-</programlisting>
-
-        <para>
-          This prints out information about crashed tables so that we
-          can examine and repair them when needed.
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          Because we have not had any unexpectedly crashed tables
-          (tables that become corrupted for reasons other than hardware
-          trouble) for several years, once a week is more than
-          sufficient for us.
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          We recommend that to start with, you execute
-          <command>myisamchk -s</command> each night on all tables that
-          have been updated during the last 24 hours, until you come to
-          trust MySQL as much as we do.
-        </para>
-
-        <indexterm>
-          <primary>tables</primary>
-          <secondary>defragment</secondary>
-        </indexterm>
-
-        <para>
-          Normally, MySQL tables need little maintenance. If you are
-          changing <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables with dynamic-sized
-          rows (tables with <literal>VARCHAR</literal>,
-          <literal>BLOB</literal>, or <literal>TEXT</literal> columns)
-          or have tables with many deleted rows you may want to
-          defragment/reclaim space from the tables from time to time
-          (once a month?).
-        </para>
-
-        <para>
-          You can do this by using <literal>OPTIMIZE TABLE</literal> on
-          the tables in question. Or, if you can stop the
-          <command>mysqld</command> server for a while, change location
-          into the data directory and use this command while the server
-          is stopped:
-        </para>
-
-<programlisting>
-shell&gt; <userinput>myisamchk -r -s --sort-index --sort_buffer_size=16M */*.MYI</userinput>
-</programlisting>
-
-      </section>
-
       <section id="table-info">
 
         <title>&title-table-info;</title>
@@ -20883,6 +20770,119 @@
 
       </section>
 
+      <section id="maintenance-schedule">
+
+        <title>&title-maintenance-schedule;</title>
+
+        <indexterm>
+          <primary>maintaining</primary>
+          <secondary>tables</secondary>
+        </indexterm>
+
+        <indexterm>
+          <primary>tables</primary>
+          <secondary>maintenance regimen</secondary>
+        </indexterm>
+
+        <para>
+          It is a good idea to perform table checks on a regular basis
+          rather than waiting for problems to occur. One way to check
+          and repair <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables is with the
+          <literal>CHECK TABLE</literal> and <literal>REPAIR
+          TABLE</literal> statements. See <xref linkend="check-table"/>,
+          and <xref linkend="repair-table"/>.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          Another way to check tables is to use
+          <command>myisamchk</command>. For maintenance purposes, you
+          can use <command>myisamchk -s</command>. The
+          <option>-s</option> option (short for
+          <option>--silent</option>) causes <command>myisamchk</command>
+          to run in silent mode, printing messages only when errors
+          occur.
+        </para>
+
+        <indexterm type="type">
+          <primary>.pid (process ID) file</primary>
+        </indexterm>
+
+        <para>
+          It is also a good idea to check tables when the server starts.
+          For example, whenever the machine has done a restart in the
+          middle of an update, you usually need to check all the tables
+          that could have been affected. (These are <quote>expected
+          crashed tables.</quote>) To check <literal>MyISAM</literal>
+          tables automatically, start the server with the
+          <option>--myisam-recover</option> option.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          An even better test would be to check any table that has a
+          last-modified time more recent than that of the
+          <filename>.pid</filename> file.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          You should also check your tables regularly during normal
+          system operation. At MySQL AB, we run a
+          <command>cron</command> job to check all our important tables
+          once a week, using a line like this in a
+          <filename>crontab</filename> file:
+        </para>
+
+<programlisting>
+35 0 * * 0 <replaceable>/path/to/myisamchk</replaceable> --fast --silent <replaceable>/path/to/datadir</replaceable>/*/*.MYI
+</programlisting>
+
+        <para>
+          This prints out information about crashed tables so that we
+          can examine and repair them when needed.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          Because we have not had any unexpectedly crashed tables
+          (tables that become corrupted for reasons other than hardware
+          trouble) for several years, once a week is more than
+          sufficient for us.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          We recommend that to start with, you execute
+          <command>myisamchk -s</command> each night on all tables that
+          have been updated during the last 24 hours, until you come to
+          trust MySQL as much as we do.
+        </para>
+
+        <indexterm>
+          <primary>tables</primary>
+          <secondary>defragment</secondary>
+        </indexterm>
+
+        <para>
+          Normally, MySQL tables need little maintenance. If you are
+          changing <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables with dynamic-sized
+          rows (tables with <literal>VARCHAR</literal>,
+          <literal>BLOB</literal>, or <literal>TEXT</literal> columns)
+          or have tables with many deleted rows you may want to
+          defragment/reclaim space from the tables from time to time
+          (once a month?).
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+          You can do this by using <literal>OPTIMIZE TABLE</literal> on
+          the tables in question. Or, if you can stop the
+          <command>mysqld</command> server for a while, change location
+          into the data directory and use this command while the server
+          is stopped:
+        </para>
+
+<programlisting>
+shell&gt; <userinput>myisamchk -r -s --sort-index --sort_buffer_size=16M */*.MYI</userinput>
+</programlisting>
+
+      </section>
+
     </section>
 
   </section>

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