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From:paul Date:January 29 2006 5:01am
Subject:svn commit - mysqldoc@docsrva: r1098 - in trunk: . refman-4.1 refman-5.0 refman-5.1
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Author: paul
Date: 2006-01-29 06:00:58 +0100 (Sun, 29 Jan 2006)
New Revision: 1098

Log:
 r6846@frost:  paul | 2006-01-28 22:52:41 -0600
 General revisions.


Modified:
   trunk/
   trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml
   trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml
   trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml


Property changes on: trunk
___________________________________________________________________
Name: svk:merge
   - b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:6845
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:2588
   + b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:6846
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:2588

Modified: trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-29 05:00:39 UTC (rev 1097)
+++ trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-29 05:00:58 UTC (rev 1098)
@@ -2841,9 +2841,9 @@
               If this is set to a non-zero value, all tables are closed
               every <literal>flush_time</literal> seconds to free up
               resources and synchronize unflushed data to disk. We
-              recommend this option be used only on Windows 9x or Me, or
-              on systems with minimal resources. This variable was added
-              in MySQL 3.22.18.
+              recommend that this option be used only on Windows 9x or
+              Me, or on systems with minimal resources. This variable
+              was added in MySQL 3.22.18.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -3722,33 +3722,31 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              If set to <literal>1</literal>, table names are stored in
-              lowercase on disk and table name comparisons are not case
-              sensitive. This variable was added in MySQL 3.23.6. If set
-              to <literal>2</literal> (new in 4.0.18), table names are
-              stored as given but compared in lowercase. From MySQL
-              4.0.2, this option also applies to database names. From
-              4.1.1, it also applies to table aliases. See
-              <xref linkend="name-case-sensitivity"/>.
+              If set to 1 table names are stored in lowercase on disk
+              and table name comparisons are not case sensitive. This
+              variable was added in MySQL 3.23.6. If set to 2 (new in
+              4.0.18), table names are stored as given but compared in
+              lowercase. From MySQL 4.0.2, this option also applies to
+              database names. From 4.1.1, it also applies to table
+              aliases. See <xref linkend="name-case-sensitivity"/>.
             </para>
 
             <para>
               <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: If you are using
               <literal>InnoDB</literal> tables, you should set this
-              variable to <literal>1</literal> on all platforms to force
-              names to be converted to lowercase.
+              variable to 1 on all platforms to force names to be
+              converted to lowercase.
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              You should <emphasis>not</emphasis> set this variable to
-              <literal>0</literal> if you are running MySQL on a system
-              that does not have case-sensitive filenames (such as
-              Windows or Mac OS X). <emphasis>New in 4.0.18</emphasis>:
-              If this variable is not set at startup and the filesystem
-              on which the data directory is located does not have
-              case-sensitive filenames, MySQL automatically sets
-              <literal>lower_case_table_names</literal> to
-              <literal>2</literal>.
+              You should <emphasis>not</emphasis> set this variable to 0
+              if you are running MySQL on a system that does not have
+              case-sensitive filenames (such as Windows or Mac OS X).
+              <emphasis>New in 4.0.18</emphasis>: If this variable is
+              not set at startup and the filesystem on which the data
+              directory is located does not have case-sensitive
+              filenames, MySQL automatically sets
+              <literal>lower_case_table_names</literal> to 2.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -3804,9 +3802,9 @@
               size to exceed the value of this variable, the server
               rotates the binary logs (closes the current file and opens
               the next one). You cannot set this variable to more than
-              more than 1GB or to less than 4096 bytes. (The minimum
-              before MYSQL 4.0.14 is 1024 bytes.) The default value is
-              1GB. This variable was added in MySQL 3.23.33.
+              1GB or to less than 4096 bytes. (The minimum before MYSQL
+              4.0.14 is 1024 bytes.) The default value is 1GB. This
+              variable was added in MySQL 3.23.33.
             </para>
 
             <para>
@@ -3864,11 +3862,10 @@
               to insert data into a new table after all <literal>INSERT
               DELAYED</literal> threads are in use, the row is inserted
               as if the <literal>DELAYED</literal> attribute wasn't
-              specified. If you set this to <literal>0</literal>, MySQL
-              never creates a thread to handle
-              <literal>DELAYED</literal> rows; in effect, doing so
-              disables <literal>DELAYED</literal> entirely. This
-              variable was added in MySQL 3.23.0.
+              specified. If you set this to 0, MySQL never creates a
+              thread to handle <literal>DELAYED</literal> rows; in
+              effect, doing so disables <literal>DELAYED</literal>
+              entirely. This variable was added in MySQL 3.23.0.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -3922,7 +3919,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              do not allow <literal>SELECT</literal> statements that
+              Do not allow <literal>SELECT</literal> statements that
               probably need to examine more than
               <literal>max_join_size</literal> rows (for single-table
               statements) or row combinations (for multiple-table
@@ -3937,8 +3934,8 @@
 
             <para>
               Setting this variable to a value other than
-              <literal>DEFAULT</literal> resets the
-              <literal>SQL_BIG_SELECTS</literal> value to
+              <literal>DEFAULT</literal> resets the value of
+              <literal>SQL_BIG_SELECTS</literal> to
               <literal>0</literal>. If you set the
               <literal>SQL_BIG_SELECTS</literal> value again, the
               <literal>max_join_size</literal> variable is ignored.
@@ -7120,7 +7117,7 @@
         </para>
 
         <para>
-          The following list describes all the supported modes:
+          The following list describes all supported modes:
         </para>
 
         <itemizedlist>
@@ -7248,7 +7245,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              do not print MySQL-specific column options in the output
+              Do not print MySQL-specific column options in the output
               of <literal>SHOW CREATE TABLE</literal>. This mode is used
               by <command>mysqldump</command> in portability mode. (New
               in MySQL 4.1.1)
@@ -7265,7 +7262,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              do not print MySQL-specific index options in the output of
+              Do not print MySQL-specific index options in the output of
               <literal>SHOW CREATE TABLE</literal>. This mode is used by
               <command>mysqldump</command> in portability mode. (New in
               MySQL 4.1.1)
@@ -7282,7 +7279,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              do not print MySQL-specific table options (such as
+              Do not print MySQL-specific table options (such as
               <literal>ENGINE</literal>) in the output of <literal>SHOW
               CREATE TABLE</literal>. This mode is used by
               <command>mysqldump</command> in portability mode. (New in
@@ -7576,7 +7573,7 @@
             </para>
 
 <programlisting>
-Error: cannot create thread to kill server
+Error: Can't create thread to kill server
 </programlisting>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -9576,8 +9573,8 @@
             Learn the MySQL access privilege system. The
             <literal>GRANT</literal> and <literal>REVOKE</literal>
             statements are used for controlling access to MySQL. Do not
-            grant any more privileges than necessary. Never grant
-            privileges to all hosts.
+            grant more privileges than necessary. Never grant privileges
+            to all hosts.
           </para>
 
           <para>
@@ -9731,8 +9728,9 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Try to enter &lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo; and
-                &lsquo;<literal>"</literal>&rsquo; in all your Web
+                Try to enter single and double quote marks
+                (&lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo; and
+                &lsquo;<literal>"</literal>&rsquo;) in all of your Web
                 forms. If you get any kind of MySQL error, investigate
                 the problem right away.
               </para>
@@ -9740,22 +9738,22 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Try to modify any dynamic URLs by adding
+                Try to modify dynamic URLs by adding
                 <literal>%22</literal>
                 (&lsquo;<literal>"</literal>&rsquo;),
                 <literal>%23</literal>
                 (&lsquo;<literal>#</literal>&rsquo;), and
                 <literal>%27</literal>
-                (&lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo;) in the URL.
+                (&lsquo;<literal>'</literal>&rsquo;) to them.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Try to modify data types in dynamic URLs from numeric
-                ones to character ones containing characters from
+                Try to modify data types in dynamic URLs from numeric to
+                character types using the characters shown in the
                 previous examples. Your application should be safe
-                against this and similar attacks.
+                against these and similar attacks.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -9771,14 +9769,14 @@
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Check data sizes before passing them to MySQL.
+                Check the size of data before passing it to MySQL.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Consider having your application connect to the database
-                using a different username than the one you use for
+                Have your application connect to the database using a
+                different username than the one you use for
                 administrative purposes. Do not give your applications
                 any access privileges they do not need.
               </para>
@@ -9864,10 +9862,10 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            Learn to use the <literal>tcpdump</literal> and
-            <literal>strings</literal> utilities. For most cases, you
-            can check whether MySQL data streams are unencrypted by
-            issuing a command like the following:
+            Learn to use the <command>tcpdump</command> and
+            <command>strings</command> utilities. In most cases, you can
+            check whether MySQL data streams are unencrypted by issuing
+            a command like the following:
           </para>
 
 <programlisting>
@@ -9907,11 +9905,10 @@
         The password is not transmitted in clear text over the
         connection. Password handling during the client connection
         sequence was upgraded in MySQL 4.1.1 to be very secure. If you
-        are using an older version of MySQL, or are still using
-        pre-4.1.1-style passwords, the encryption algorithm is not as
-        strong as the newer algorithmm With some effort, a clever
-        attacker who can sniff the traffic between the client and the
-        server can crack the password. (See
+        are still using pre-4.1.1-style passwords, the encryption
+        algorithm is not as strong as the newer algorithm. With some
+        effort, a clever attacker who can sniff the traffic between the
+        client and the server can crack the password. (See
         <xref linkend="password-hashing"/>, for a discussion of the
         different password handling methods.)
       </para>
@@ -9974,7 +9971,7 @@
 
           <para>
             <command>mysqld</command> can (and should) be run as an
-            ordinary, unprivileged user instead. You can also create a
+            ordinary, unprivileged user instead. You can create a
             separate Unix account named <literal>mysql</literal> to make
             everything even more secure. Use this account only for
             administering MySQL. To start <command>mysqld</command> as a
@@ -10100,7 +10097,8 @@
             <literal>max_user_connections</literal> variable in
             <command>mysqld</command>. The <literal>GRANT</literal>
             statement also supports resource control options for
-            limiting the extent of server use allowed to an account.
+            limiting the extent of server use allowed to an account. See
+            <xref linkend="grant"/>.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -10449,8 +10447,8 @@
       </indexterm>
 
       <para>
-        On Windows, you can run the server as a Windows service using
-        normal user accounts beginning with MySQL 4.0.17 and 4.1.2.
+        On Windows, you can run the server as a Windows service using a
+        normal user account beginning with MySQL 4.0.17 and 4.1.2.
         (Older MySQL versions required you to have administrator rights.
         This was a bug introduced in MySQL 3.23.54.)
       </para>
@@ -13131,7 +13129,7 @@
           <para>
             In this case, you must restart the server with the
             <option>--skip-grant-tables</option> option and edit your
-            <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> or
+            <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> file or
             <filename>\windows\hosts</filename> file to add an entry for
             your host.
           </para>
@@ -15479,9 +15477,9 @@
 </programlisting>
 
           <para>
-            The '<userinput>*</userinput>' characters indicate where you
-            enter your password. The password is not displayed as you
-            enter it.
+            The &lsquo;<literal>*</literal>&rsquo; characters indicate
+            where you enter your password. The password is not displayed
+            as you enter it.
           </para>
 
           <para>
@@ -15552,8 +15550,8 @@
       </itemizedlist>
 
       <para>
-        In sum, the safest methods are to have the client program prompt
-        for the password or to specify the password in a properly
+        All in all, the safest methods are to have the client program
+        prompt for the password or to specify the password in a properly
         protected option file.
       </para>
 
@@ -16259,7 +16257,7 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        Another way to back up a database is to use the
+        Another technique for backing up a database is to use the
         <command>mysqldump</command> program or the
         <command>mysqlhotcopy script</command>. See
         <xref linkend="mysqldump"/>, and <xref linkend="mysqlhotcopy"/>.
@@ -16389,7 +16387,7 @@
 </programlisting>
 
           <para>
-            In your case, you may want to re-run only certain binary
+            In some cases, you may want to re-run only certain binary
             logs, from certain positions (usually you want to re-run all
             binary logs from the date of the restored backup, excepting
             possibly some incorrect statements). See
@@ -16549,7 +16547,7 @@
         We assume that data is stored in the <literal>InnoDB</literal>
         storage engine, which has support for transactions and automatic
         crash recovery. We also assume that the MySQL server is under
-        load at the time of crash. If it were not, no recovery would
+        load at the time of the crash. If it were not, no recovery would
         ever be needed.
       </para>
 
@@ -16600,7 +16598,7 @@
         install a new one, or otherwise correct the underlying problem.
         Then it is necessary to recover our MySQL data from backups,
         which means that we must already have made backups. To make sure
-        that is the case, we should have a backup policy.
+        that is the case, we should design a backup policy.
       </para>
 
       <section id="backup-policy">
@@ -16654,16 +16652,16 @@
 
         <para>
           Full backups are necessary, but they are not always
-          convenient. They produce large files and take time to
+          convenient. They produce large backup files and take time to
           generate. They are not optimal in the sense that each
           successive full backup includes all data, even that part that
           has not changed since the previous full backup. After we have
           made the initial full backup, it is preferable to make
           incremental backups. They are smaller and take less time to
-          produce. (The tradeoff is that at recovery time, you do not
+          produce. The tradeoff is that, at recovery time, you cannot
           restore your data just by reloading the full backup. You must
           also process the incremental backups to recover the
-          incremental changes.)
+          incremental changes.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -17223,15 +17221,14 @@
 
         <para>
           This section describes how to check for and deal with data
-          corruption in MySQL databases. If your tables are corrupted
-          frequently you should try to find the reason why. See
+          corruption in MySQL databases. If your tables become corrupted
+          frequently, you should try to find the reason why. See
           <xref linkend="crashing"/>.
         </para>
 
         <para>
-          The <literal>MyISAM</literal> table section discusses some
-          reasons why a table could be corrupted. See
-          <xref linkend="myisam-table-problems"/>.
+          For an explanation of how <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables can
+          become corrupted, see <xref linkend="myisam-table-problems"/>.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -17335,8 +17332,9 @@
               corruption that involves <emphasis>only</emphasis> the
               data file (which is very unusual). If you want to check a
               table, you should normally run
-              <command>myisamchk</command> without options or using the
-              <option>-s</option> or <option>--silent</option> option.
+              <command>myisamchk</command> without options or with
+              either the <option>-s</option> or
+              <option>--silent</option> option.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -17371,8 +17369,8 @@
               first error it finds. If you want to obtain more
               information, you can add the <option>--verbose</option>
               (<option>-v</option>) option. This causes
-              <command>myisamchk</command> to continue, up to a maximum
-              of 20 errors.
+              <command>myisamchk</command> to keep going, up through a
+              maximum of 20 errors.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -17434,7 +17432,7 @@
         </para>
 
         <para>
-          The symptoms of a corrupted table include queries that abort
+          Symptoms of corrupted tables include queries that abort
           unexpectedly and observable errors such as these:
         </para>
 
@@ -17449,7 +17447,7 @@
 
           <listitem>
             <para>
-              cannot find file
+              Can't find file
               <filename><replaceable>tbl_name</replaceable>.MYI</filename>
               (Errcode: <replaceable>nnn</replaceable>)
             </para>
@@ -17622,8 +17620,8 @@
               Use <command>myisamchk -r
               <replaceable>tbl_name</replaceable></command>
               (<option>-r</option> means <quote>recovery mode</quote>).
-              This removes incorrect and deleted rows from the data file
-              and reconstructs the index file.
+              This removes incorrect rows and deleted rows from the data
+              file and reconstructs the index file.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -17964,7 +17962,7 @@
         <para>
           To obtain a description of a table or statistics about it, use
           the commands shown here. We explain some of the information in
-          more detail later:
+          more detail later.
         </para>
 
         <itemizedlist>
@@ -19031,7 +19029,7 @@
             <listitem>
               <para>
                 Comments start with a &lsquo;<literal>#</literal>&rsquo;
-                character and proceed to the end of the line.
+                character and continue to the end of the line.
               </para>
             </listitem>
 
@@ -19125,7 +19123,7 @@
 <programlisting>
 /*
  * This comment is parsed by configure to create ctype.c,
- * so do not change it unless you know what you are doing.
+ * so don't change it unless you know what you are doing.
  *
  * .configure. number_<replaceable>MYSET</replaceable>=<replaceable>MYNUMBER</replaceable>
  * .configure. strxfrm_multiply_<replaceable>MYSET</replaceable>=<replaceable>N</replaceable>
@@ -20097,8 +20095,8 @@
             server is started with
             <literal>binlog-do-db=sales</literal>, and you run
             <literal>USE prices; UPDATE sales.january SET
-            amount=amount+1000;</literal>, this statement does
-            <emphasis>not</emphasis> get written into the binary log.
+            amount=amount+1000;</literal>, this statement is
+            <emphasis>not</emphasis> written into the binary log.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -20126,9 +20124,9 @@
 
           <para>
             Similar to the case for <option>--binlog-do-db</option>,
-            there is an exception to the
-            <literal>CREATE</literal>/<literal>ALTER</literal>/<literal>DROP</literal>
-            <literal>DATABASE</literal> statements, which use the
+            there is an exception to the <literal>CREATE
+            DATABASE</literal>, <literal>ALTER DATABASE</literal>, and
+            <literal>DROP DATABASE</literal> statements, which use the
             database manipulated to decide if it should log the
             statement rather than the default database.
           </para>
@@ -20137,8 +20135,8 @@
       </itemizedlist>
 
       <para>
-        To log or ignore multiple databases, specify the appropriate
-        option multiple times, once for each database.
+        To log or ignore multiple databases, use multiple options,
+        specifying the appropriate option once for each database.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -20148,7 +20146,7 @@
         <literal>CREATE</literal>/<literal>ALTER</literal>/<literal>DROP
         DATABASE</literal> statements. In those cases, the database
         being <emphasis>created, altered, or dropped</emphasis> replaces
-        the default database in the rules below.
+        the default database in the following rules.
       </para>
 
       <orderedlist>
@@ -20796,9 +20794,9 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      If you want better performance, you can also specify the following
-      options differently for each server, to spread the load between
-      several physical disks:
+      For better performance, you can also specify the following options
+      differently for each server, to spread the load between several
+      physical disks:
     </para>
 
     <itemizedlist>
@@ -20854,7 +20852,7 @@
 
       <listitem>
         <para>
-          The main problem is that NFS is the speed bottleneck. It is
+          The primary problem is that NFS is the speed bottleneck. It is
           not meant for such use.
         </para>
       </listitem>
@@ -21467,7 +21465,7 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            As of MySQL 4.1, you can start the client with
+            As of MySQL 4.1, start the client with
             <option>--protocol=tcp</option> to connect via TCP/IP,
             <option>--protocol=socket</option> to connect via a Unix
             socket file, <option>--protocol=pipe</option> to connect via
@@ -21691,17 +21689,17 @@
       <para>
         Queries must be <emphasis>exactly</emphasis> the same (byte for
         byte) to be seen as identical. In addition, query strings that
-        are identical may be treated as <quote>different</quote> for
-        other reasons. Queries that use different databases, different
-        protocol versions, or different default character sets are
-        considered different queries and are cached separately.
+        are identical may be treated as different for other reasons.
+        Queries that use different databases, different protocol
+        versions, or different default character sets are considered
+        different queries and are cached separately.
       </para>
 
       <para>
         Before a query result is fetched from the query cache, MySQL
         checks that the user has <literal>SELECT</literal> privilege for
-        all the involved databases and tables. If this is not the case,
-        the cached result is not used.
+        all databases and tables involved. If this is not the case, the
+        cached result is not used.
       </para>
 
       <para>

Modified: trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml	2006-01-29 05:00:39 UTC (rev 1097)
+++ trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml	2006-01-29 05:00:58 UTC (rev 1098)
@@ -1799,7 +1799,7 @@
               name for each new file. This works around a problem in the
               Linux kernel dealing with creating many new files with
               different names. With the old behavior, Linux seems to
-              <quote>leak</quote> memory, because it's being allocated
+              <quote>leak</quote> memory, because it is being allocated
               to the directory entry cache rather than to the disk
               cache.
             </para>
@@ -4036,7 +4036,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              You must increase this value if you are using big
+              You must increase this value if you are using large
               <literal>BLOB</literal> columns or long strings. It should
               be as big as the biggest <literal>BLOB</literal> you want
               to use. The protocol limit for
@@ -4119,7 +4119,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              Don't start more than this number of threads to handle
+              Do not start more than this number of threads to handle
               <literal>INSERT DELAYED</literal> statements. If you try
               to insert data into a new table after all <literal>INSERT
               DELAYED</literal> threads are in use, the row is inserted
@@ -4179,7 +4179,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              Don't allow <literal>SELECT</literal> statements that
+              Do not allow <literal>SELECT</literal> statements that
               probably need to examine more than
               <literal>max_join_size</literal> rows (for single-table
               statements) or row combinations (for multiple-table
@@ -4286,7 +4286,7 @@
 
             <para>
               The maximum number of temporary tables a client can keep
-              open at the same time. (This option doesn't yet do
+              open at the same time. (This option does not yet do
               anything.)
             </para>
           </listitem>
@@ -4819,7 +4819,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <remark>
-              It won't necessarily eliminate allocation completely;
+              It will not necessarily eliminate allocation completely;
               server *may* still allocate memory in some situations,
               e.g., transaction-related or sp-related ops.
             </remark>
@@ -7483,7 +7483,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              The number of tables that are currently open.
+              The number of tables that are open.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -8262,9 +8262,9 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              Don't print MySQL-specific column options in the output of
-              <literal>SHOW CREATE TABLE</literal>. This mode is used by
-              <command>mysqldump</command> in portability mode.
+              Do not print MySQL-specific column options in the output
+              of <literal>SHOW CREATE TABLE</literal>. This mode is used
+              by <command>mysqldump</command> in portability mode.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -8278,7 +8278,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              Don't print MySQL-specific index options in the output of
+              Do not print MySQL-specific index options in the output of
               <literal>SHOW CREATE TABLE</literal>. This mode is used by
               <command>mysqldump</command> in portability mode.
             </para>
@@ -8294,7 +8294,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              Don't print MySQL-specific table options (such as
+              Do not print MySQL-specific table options (such as
               <literal>ENGINE</literal>) in the output of <literal>SHOW
               CREATE TABLE</literal>. This mode is used by
               <command>mysqldump</command> in portability mode.
@@ -8311,7 +8311,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              In subtraction operations, don't mark the result as
+              In subtraction operations, do not mark the result as
               <literal>UNSIGNED</literal> if one of the operands is
               unsigned. Note that this makes <literal>BIGINT
               UNSIGNED</literal> not 100% usable in all contexts. See
@@ -11680,7 +11680,7 @@
                 If you get a connection and some garbage characters, the
                 port is open, and should be closed on your firewall or
                 router, unless you really have a good reason to keep it
-                open. If <literal>telnet</literal> hangs or the
+                open. If <command>telnet</command> hangs or the
                 connection is refused, the port is blocked, which is how
                 you want it to be.
               </para>
@@ -11718,8 +11718,7 @@
             ID='234'</literal>. If the user enters extra information, it
             all becomes part of the string. In a numeric context, MySQL
             automatically converts this string to a number and strips
-            any trailing non-numeric characters which the string may
-            contain.
+            any trailing non-numeric characters from it.
           </para>
 
           <para>
@@ -11879,8 +11878,8 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            Learn to use the <literal>tcpdump</literal> and
-            <literal>strings</literal> utilities. In most cases, you can
+            Learn to use the <command>tcpdump</command> and
+            <command>strings</command> utilities. In most cases, you can
             check whether MySQL data streams are unencrypted by issuing
             a command like the following:
           </para>
@@ -11922,7 +11921,7 @@
         connection. Password handling during the client connection
         sequence was upgraded in MySQL 4.1.1 to be very secure. If you
         are still using pre-4.1.1-style passwords, the encryption
-        algorithm is not as strong as the newer algorithmm With some
+        algorithm is not as strong as the newer algorithm. With some
         effort, a clever attacker who can sniff the traffic between the
         client and the server can crack the password. (See
         <xref linkend="password-hashing"/>, for a discussion of the
@@ -11987,7 +11986,7 @@
 
           <para>
             <command>mysqld</command> can (and should) be run as an
-            ordinary unprivileged user instead. You can create a
+            ordinary, unprivileged user instead. You can create a
             separate Unix account named <literal>mysql</literal> to make
             everything even more secure. Use this account only for
             administering MySQL. To start <command>mysqld</command> as a
@@ -12015,8 +12014,9 @@
             Running <command>mysqld</command> as a Unix user other than
             <literal>root</literal> does not mean that you need to
             change the <literal>root</literal> username in the
-            <literal>user</literal> table. Usernames for MySQL accounts
-            have nothing to do with usernames for Unix accounts.
+            <literal>user</literal> table. <emphasis>Usernames for MySQL
+            accounts have nothing to do with usernames for Unix
+            accounts</emphasis>.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -12075,7 +12075,7 @@
             Do not grant the <literal>FILE</literal> privilege to
             non-administrative users. Any user that has this privilege
             can write a file anywhere in the filesystem with the
-            privileges of the <command>mysqld</command> daemon! To make
+            privileges of the <command>mysqld</command> daemon. To make
             this a bit safer, files generated with <literal>SELECT ...
             INTO OUTFILE</literal> do not overwrite existing files and
             are writable by everyone.
@@ -12098,17 +12098,17 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            If you don't trust your DNS, you should use IP numbers
+            If you do not trust your DNS, you should use IP numbers
             rather than hostnames in the grant tables. In any case, you
             should be very careful about creating grant table entries
-            using hostname values that contain wildcards!
+            using hostname values that contain wildcards.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            If you want to restrict the number of connections allowed
-            for a single account, you can do so by setting the
+            If you want to restrict the number of connections allowed to
+            a single account, you can do so by setting the
             <literal>max_user_connections</literal> variable in
             <command>mysqld</command>. The <literal>GRANT</literal>
             statement also supports resource control options for
@@ -12217,7 +12217,7 @@
 </programlisting>
 
           <para>
-            This ensures that the user can't change any privilege
+            This ensures that the user cannot change any privilege
             columns directly, but has to use the
             <literal>GRANT</literal> statement to give privileges to
             other users.
@@ -12364,7 +12364,7 @@
         <listitem>
           <para>
             By default, all MySQL clients and libraries in binary
-            distributions are now compiled with the
+            distributions are compiled with the
             <option>--enable-local-infile</option> option, to be
             compatible with MySQL 3.23.48 and before.
           </para>
@@ -15112,7 +15112,7 @@
         If you change the grant tables directly but forget to reload
         them, your changes have <emphasis>no effect</emphasis> until you
         restart the server. This may leave you wondering why your
-        changes don't seem to make any difference!
+        changes do not seem to make any difference!
       </para>
 
     </section>
@@ -15172,7 +15172,7 @@
           <para>
             The grant tables must be properly set up so that the server
             can use them for access control. For some distribution types
-            (such as binary distributions on Windows or RPM
+            (such as binary distributions on Windows, or RPM
             distributions on Linux), the installation process
             initializes the <literal>mysql</literal> database containing
             the grant tables. For distributions that do not do this, you
@@ -15266,7 +15266,7 @@
         <listitem>
           <para>
             If you try to connect as <literal>root</literal> and get the
-            following error, it means that you don't have a row in the
+            following error, it means that you do not have a row in the
             <literal>user</literal> table with a <literal>User</literal>
             column value of <literal>'root'</literal> and that
             <command>mysqld</command> cannot resolve the hostname for
@@ -15502,7 +15502,7 @@
             upgrade your operating system or <literal>glibc</literal>,
             or download a source distribution of MySQL version and
             compile it yourself. A source RPM is normally trivial to
-            compile and install, so this isn't a big problem.
+            compile and install, so this is not a big problem.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -15637,7 +15637,7 @@
             <replaceable>user_name</replaceable></literal> works when
             executed on the server host, but <literal>mysql -h
             <replaceable>host_name</replaceable> -u
-            <replaceable>user_name</replaceable></literal> doesn't work
+            <replaceable>user_name</replaceable></literal> does not work
             when executed on a remote client host, you have not enabled
             access to the server for the given username from the remote
             host.
@@ -15646,7 +15646,7 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            If you can't figure out why you get <literal>Access
+            If you cannot figure out why you get <literal>Access
             denied</literal>, remove from the <literal>user</literal>
             table all entries that have <literal>Host</literal> values
             containing wildcards (entries that contain
@@ -15657,7 +15657,7 @@
             <literal>User</literal>=<literal>'<replaceable>some_user</replaceable>'</literal>,
             thinking that this allows you to specify
             <literal>localhost</literal> to connect from the same
-            machine. The reason that this doesn't work is that the
+            machine. The reason that this does not work is that the
             default privileges include an entry with
             <literal>Host</literal>=<literal>'localhost'</literal> and
             <literal>User</literal>=<literal>''</literal>. Because that
@@ -15701,7 +15701,7 @@
             <literal>Access denied</literal> message whenever you issue
             a <literal>SELECT ... INTO OUTFILE</literal> or
             <literal>LOAD DATA INFILE</literal> statement, your entry in
-            the <literal>user</literal> table doesn't have the
+            the <literal>user</literal> table does not have the
             <literal>FILE</literal> privilege enabled.
           </para>
         </listitem>
@@ -16533,10 +16533,10 @@
             username to be specified with a <option>-u</option> or
             <option>--user</option> option. Because this means that
             anyone can attempt to connect to the server using any
-            username, you can't make a database secure in any way unless
-            all MySQL accounts have passwords. Anyone who specifies a
-            username for an account that has no password is able to
-            connect successfully to the server.
+            username, you cannot make a database secure in any way
+            unless all MySQL accounts have passwords. Anyone who
+            specifies a username for an account that has no password is
+            able to connect successfully to the server.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -17594,7 +17594,7 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            Use a <option>-p</option> or <option>--password</option>
+            Use the <option>-p</option> or <option>--password</option>
             option with no password value specified. In this case, the
             client program solicits the password from the terminal:
           </para>
@@ -17619,7 +17619,7 @@
             non-interactively, there is no opportunity to enter the
             password from the terminal. On some systems, you may even
             find that the first line of your script is read and
-            interpreted (incorrectly) as your password!
+            interpreted (incorrectly) as your password.
           </para>
 
           <indexterm type="type">
@@ -17732,9 +17732,9 @@
         <title>&title-secure-basics;</title>
 
         <para>
-          To understand how MySQL uses SSL, it's necessary to explain
+          To understand how MySQL uses SSL, it is necessary to explain
           some basic SSL and X509 concepts. People who are familiar with
-          them can skip this part.
+          these can skip this part of the discussion.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -18284,7 +18284,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              Note that use of <option>--ssl</option> doesn't
+              Note that use of <option>--ssl</option> does not
               <emphasis>require</emphasis> an SSL connection. For
               example, if the server or client is compiled without SSL
               support, a normal unencrypted connection is used.
@@ -18397,7 +18397,7 @@
 
             <para>
               Install an SSH client on your Windows machine. As a user,
-              the best non-free one I've found is from
+              the best non-free one I have found is from
               <literal>SecureCRT</literal> from
               <ulink url="http://www.vandyke.com/"/>. Another option is
               <literal>f-secure</literal> from
@@ -18433,8 +18433,8 @@
 
           <listitem>
             <para>
-              Save everything, otherwise you'll have to redo it the next
-              time.
+              Save everything, otherwise you will have to redo it the
+              next time.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -18479,8 +18479,8 @@
     <title>&title-disaster-prevention;</title>
 
     <remark role="todo">
-      a lot of the information here assumes MyISAM implicitly and won't
-      necessarily work for other storage engines.
+      a lot of the information here assumes MyISAM implicitly and will
+      not necessarily work for other storage engines.
     </remark>
 
     <para>
@@ -18538,7 +18538,7 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            Do a full backup of your database:
+            Create a full backup of your database:
           </para>
 
 <programlisting>
@@ -18574,7 +18574,7 @@
               <secondary>names</secondary>
             </indexterm>
 
-            Stop <command>mysqld</command> if it's running, then start
+            Stop <command>mysqld</command> if it is running, then start
             it with the
             <option>--log-bin[=<replaceable>file_name</replaceable>]</option>
             option. See <xref linkend="binary-log"/>. The binary log
@@ -18587,7 +18587,7 @@
       </orderedlist>
 
       <para>
-        For <literal>InnoDB</literal> tables, it's possible to perform
+        For <literal>InnoDB</literal> tables, it is possible to perform
         an online backup that takes no locks on tables; see
         <xref linkend="mysqldump"/>.
       </para>
@@ -18669,7 +18669,7 @@
       </orderedlist>
 
       <para>
-        You can also do selective backups of individual files:
+        You can also make selective backups of individual files:
       </para>
 
       <itemizedlist>
@@ -18685,9 +18685,9 @@
         <listitem>
           <para>
             To reload the table, use <literal>LOAD DATA INFILE
-            '<replaceable>file_name</replaceable>' REPLACE ...</literal>
-            To avoid duplicate rows, the table must have a
-            <literal>PRIMARY KEY</literal> or a
+            '<replaceable>file_name</replaceable>' REPLACE
+            ...</literal>. To avoid duplicate rows, the table must have
+            a <literal>PRIMARY KEY</literal> or a
             <literal>UNIQUE</literal> index. The
             <literal>REPLACE</literal> keyword causes old rows to be
             replaced with new ones when a new row duplicates an old row
@@ -18794,11 +18794,11 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        We'll assume that data is stored in MySQL's
-        <literal>InnoDB</literal> storage engine, which has support for
-        transactions and automatic crash recovery. We'll always assume
-        that the MySQL server is under load at the time of crash. If it
-        were not, no recovery would ever be needed.
+        We assume that data is stored in the <literal>InnoDB</literal>
+        storage engine, which has support for transactions and automatic
+        crash recovery. We also assume that the MySQL server is under
+        load at the time of the crash. If it were not, no recovery would
+        ever be needed.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -18810,9 +18810,9 @@
         and non-committed transactions that have not been flushed to the
         data files. <literal>InnoDB</literal> automatically rolls back
         those transactions that were not committed, and flushes to its
-        data files those that were. Information about this recovery
-        process is conveyed to the user through the MySQL error log. The
-        following is an example log excerpt:
+        data files those that were committed. Information about this
+        recovery process is conveyed to the user through the MySQL error
+        log. The following is an example log excerpt:
       </para>
 
 <programlisting>
@@ -18840,16 +18840,15 @@
 </programlisting>
 
       <para>
-        In cases of filesystem crashes or hardware problems, we can
+        For the cases of filesystem crashes or hardware problems, we can
         assume that the MySQL disk data is <emphasis>not</emphasis>
         available after a restart. This means that MySQL fails to start
         successfully because some blocks of disk data are no longer
-        readable. In this case, it's necessary to reformat the disk,
+        readable. In this case, it is necessary to reformat the disk,
         install a new one, or otherwise correct the underlying problem.
-        Then it's necessary to recover our MySQL data from backups,
+        Then it is necessary to recover our MySQL data from backups,
         which means that we must already have made backups. To make sure
-        that is the case, let's step back in time and design a backup
-        policy.
+        that is the case, we should design a backup policy.
       </para>
 
       <section id="backup-policy">
@@ -18895,10 +18894,10 @@
         </para>
 
         <para>
-          The resulting <filename>.sql</filename> file produced by the
-          <command>mysqldump</command> command contains a set of SQL
+          The resulting <filename>.sql</filename> file produced by
+          <command>mysqldump</command> contains a set of SQL
           <literal>INSERT</literal> statements that can be used to
-          reload the dumped tables later.
+          reload the dumped tables at a later time.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -18906,8 +18905,8 @@
           convenient. They produce large backup files and take time to
           generate. They are not optimal in the sense that each
           successive full backup includes all data, even that part that
-          didn't change since the previous full backup. After we have
-          made an initial full backup, it is more efficient to make
+          has not changed since the previous full backup. After we have
+          made the initial full backup, it is more efficient to make
           incremental backups. They are smaller and take less time to
           produce. The tradeoff is that, at recovery time, you cannot
           restore your data just by reloading the full backup. You must
@@ -18921,10 +18920,10 @@
           <option>--log-bin</option> option so that it stores these
           changes in a file while it updates data. This option enables
           binary logging, so that the server writes each SQL statement
-          that updates data into a file called a MySQL binary log. Let's
-          look at the data directory of a MySQL server that was started
-          with the <option>--log-bin</option> option and that has been
-          running for some days. We find these MySQL binary log files:
+          Looking at the data directory of a MySQL server that was
+          started with the <option>--log-bin</option> option and that
+          has been running for some days, we find these MySQL binary log
+          files:
         </para>
 
 <programlisting>
@@ -19335,7 +19334,7 @@
 
       <para>
         Even though table repair with <command>myisamchk</command> is
-        quite secure, it's always a good idea to make a backup
+        quite secure, it is always a good idea to make a backup
         <emphasis>before</emphasis> doing a repair (or any maintenance
         operation that could make a lot of changes to a table)
       </para>
@@ -19426,18 +19425,18 @@
 
         <para>
           If you run <command>mysqld</command> with external locking
-          disabled (which is the default as of MySQL 4.0), you can't
+          disabled (which is the default as of MySQL 4.0), you cannot
           reliably use <command>myisamchk</command> to check a table
           when <command>mysqld</command> is using the same table. If you
           can be sure that no one is accessing the tables through
           <command>mysqld</command> while you run
           <command>myisamchk</command>, you only have to do
           <command>mysqladmin flush-tables</command> before you start
-          checking the tables. If you can't guarantee this, then you
+          checking the tables. If you cannot guarantee this, then you
           must stop <command>mysqld</command> while you check the
           tables. If you run <command>myisamchk</command> while
           <command>mysqld</command> is updating the tables, you may get
-          a warning that a table is corrupt even when it isn't.
+          a warning that a table is corrupt even when it is not.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -19462,8 +19461,8 @@
 
         <para>
           This section describes how to check for and deal with data
-          corruption in MySQL databases. If your tables get corrupted
-          frequently you should try to find the reason why. See
+          corruption in MySQL databases. If your tables become corrupted
+          frequently, you should try to find the reason why. See
           <xref linkend="crashing"/>.
         </para>
 
@@ -19569,7 +19568,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              This finds 99.99% of all errors. What it can't find is
+              This finds 99.99% of all errors. What it cannot find is
               corruption that involves <emphasis>only</emphasis> the
               data file (which is very unusual). If you want to check a
               table, you should normally run
@@ -19623,8 +19622,8 @@
 
             <para>
               Like the previous command, but the <option>-i</option>
-              option tells <command>myisamchk</command> to print some
-              informational statistics, too.
+              option tells <command>myisamchk</command> to print
+              additional statistical information.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -19746,9 +19745,8 @@
 </programlisting>
 
         <para>
-          If you don't know the current table option values, use
-          <literal>SHOW CREATE TABLE</literal> or
-          <literal>DESCRIBE</literal>.
+          If you do not know the current table option values, use
+          <literal>SHOW CREATE TABLE</literal>.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -19813,9 +19811,9 @@
         </para>
 
         <para>
-          If you get weird errors when checking (such as <literal>out of
-          memory</literal> errors), or if <command>myisamchk</command>
-          crashes, go to Stage 3.
+          If you get strange errors when checking (such as <literal>out
+          of memory</literal> errors), or if
+          <command>myisamchk</command> crashes, go to Stage 3.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -19867,7 +19865,7 @@
               --safe-recover
               <replaceable>tbl_name</replaceable></command>. Safe
               recovery mode uses an old recovery method that handles a
-              few cases that regular recovery mode doesn't (but is
+              few cases that regular recovery mode does not (but is
               slower).
             </para>
           </listitem>
@@ -19875,7 +19873,7 @@
         </orderedlist>
 
         <para>
-          If you get weird errors when repairing (such as <literal>out
+          If you get strange errors when repairing (such as <literal>out
           of memory</literal> errors), or if
           <command>myisamchk</command> crashes, go to Stage 3.
         </para>
@@ -19887,7 +19885,7 @@
         <para>
           You should reach this stage only if the first 16KB block in
           the index file is destroyed or contains incorrect information,
-          or if the index file is missing. In this case, it's necessary
+          or if the index file is missing. In this case, it is necessary
           to create a new index file. Do so as follows:
         </para>
 
@@ -19895,7 +19893,7 @@
 
           <listitem>
             <para>
-              Move the data file to some safe place.
+              Move the data file to a safe place.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -19926,7 +19924,7 @@
 
         <para>
           Go back to Stage 2. <command>myisamchk -r -q</command> should
-          work. (This shouldn't be an endless loop.)
+          work. (This should not be an endless loop.)
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -19943,7 +19941,7 @@
         <para>
           You should reach this stage only if the
           <filename>.frm</filename> description file has also crashed.
-          That should never happen, because the description file isn't
+          That should never happen, because the description file is not
           changed after the table is created:
         </para>
 
@@ -19960,7 +19958,7 @@
 
           <listitem>
             <para>
-              If you don't have a backup but know exactly how the table
+              If you do not have a backup but know exactly how the table
               was created, create a copy of the table in another
               database. Remove the new data file, then move the
               <filename>.frm</filename> description and
@@ -20040,7 +20038,7 @@
         </itemizedlist>
 
         <para>
-          For a full description of these options, see
+          For a full description of all available options, see
           <xref linkend="myisamchk"/>.
         </para>
 
@@ -20084,7 +20082,7 @@
         </indexterm>
 
         <para>
-          It's also a good idea to check tables when the server starts.
+          It is also a good idea to check tables when the server starts.
           For example, whenever the machine has done a restart in the
           middle of an update, you usually need to check all the tables
           that could have been affected. (These are <quote>expected
@@ -20170,7 +20168,8 @@
 
         <para>
           To obtain a description of a table or statistics about it, use
-          the commands shown here:
+          the commands shown here. We explain some of the information in
+          more detail later.
         </para>
 
         <itemizedlist>
@@ -20187,7 +20186,7 @@
               you start the MySQL server with external locking disabled,
               <command>myisamchk</command> may report an error for a
               table that is updated while it runs. However, because
-              <command>myisamchk</command> doesn't change the table in
+              <command>myisamchk</command> does not change the table in
               describe mode, there is no risk of destroying data.
             </para>
           </listitem>
@@ -20592,7 +20591,7 @@
                 </para>
 
                 <para>
-                  Where in the row this index part starts.
+                  Where in the row this portion of the index starts.
                 </para>
               </listitem>
 
@@ -20602,11 +20601,11 @@
                 </para>
 
                 <para>
-                  How long this index part is. For packed numbers, this
-                  should always be the full length of the column. For
-                  strings, it may be shorter than the full length of the
-                  indexed column, because you can index a prefix of a
-                  string column.
+                  How long this portion of the index is. For packed
+                  numbers, this should always be the full length of the
+                  column. For strings, it may be shorter than the full
+                  length of the indexed column, because you can index a
+                  prefix of a string column.
                 </para>
               </listitem>
 
@@ -20617,8 +20616,8 @@
 
                 <para>
                   Whether a key value can exist multiple times in the
-                  index. Values are <literal>unique</literal> or
-                  <literal>multip.</literal> (multiple).
+                  index. Possible values are <literal>unique</literal>
+                  or <literal>multip.</literal> (multiple).
                 </para>
               </listitem>
 
@@ -20628,9 +20627,9 @@
                 </para>
 
                 <para>
-                  What data type this index part has. This is a
-                  <literal>MyISAM</literal> data type with the options
-                  <literal>packed</literal>,
+                  What data type this portion of the index has. This is
+                  a <literal>MyISAM</literal> data type with the
+                  possible values <literal>packed</literal>,
                   <literal>stripped</literal>, or
                   <literal>empty</literal>.
                 </para>
@@ -20791,7 +20790,7 @@
               Average number of blocks per row (that is, how many links
               a fragmented row is composed of). This is always 1.0 for
               fixed-format tables. This value should stay as close to
-              1.0 as possible. If it gets too big, you can reorganize
+              1.0 as possible. If it gets too large, you can reorganize
               the table. See <xref linkend="optimization"/>.
             </para>
           </listitem>
@@ -20802,8 +20801,8 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              How many blocks (links) are used. For fixed format, this
-              is the same as the number of rows.
+              How many blocks (links) are used. For fixed-format tables,
+              this is the same as the number of rows.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20962,7 +20961,7 @@
       <para>
         When a client connects to a MySQL server, the server indicates
         to the client what the server's default character set is. The
-        client switches to use this character set for this connection.
+        client switches to this character set for this connection.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -21159,7 +21158,7 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        In the following procedures, the name of your character set is
+        In the following procedures, the name of the character set is
         represented by <replaceable>MYSET</replaceable>.
       </para>
 
@@ -21234,7 +21233,7 @@
             Add the character set name to the
             <literal>CHARSETS_AVAILABLE</literal> and
             <literal>COMPILED_CHARSETS</literal> lists in
-            <literal>configure.in</literal>.
+            <filename>configure.in</filename>.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -21414,7 +21413,7 @@
         <literal>to_lower[]</literal>, <literal>to_upper[]</literal>,
         and <literal>sort_order[]</literal> are indexed by character
         value, but <literal>ctype[]</literal> is indexed by character
-        value + 1. This is an old legacy convention to be able to handle
+        value + 1. This is an old legacy convention for handling
         <literal>EOF</literal>.)
       </para>
 
@@ -21550,7 +21549,7 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            The character set is a multi-byte character set that can't
+            The character set is a multi-byte character set that cannot
             be loaded dynamically. In this case, you must recompile the
             program with support for the character set.
           </para>
@@ -21562,7 +21561,7 @@
           </remark>
 
           <para>
-            The character set is a dynamic character set, but you don't
+            The character set is a dynamic character set, but you do not
             have a configure file for it. In this case, you should
             install the configure file for the character set from a new
             MySQL distribution.
@@ -21571,7 +21570,7 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            If your <filename>Index</filename> file doesn't contain the
+            If your <filename>Index</filename> file does not contain the
             name for the character set, your program displays the
             following error message:
           </para>
@@ -21686,14 +21685,15 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        If your system has its own zoneinfo database (the set of files
-        describing time zones), you should use the
-        <command>mysql_tzinfo_to_sql</command> program for filling the
-        time zone tables. Examples of such systems are Linux, FreeBSD,
-        Sun Solaris, and Mac OS X. One likely location for these files
-        is the <filename>/usr/share/zoneinfo</filename> directory. If
-        your system does not have a zoneinfo database, you can use the
-        downloadable package described later in this section.
+        If your system has its own <firstterm>zoneinfo</firstterm>
+        database (the set of files describing time zones), you should
+        use the <command>mysql_tzinfo_to_sql</command> program for
+        filling the time zone tables. Examples of such systems are
+        Linux, FreeBSD, Sun Solaris, and Mac OS X. One likely location
+        for these files is the <filename>/usr/share/zoneinfo</filename>
+        directory. If your system does not have a zoneinfo database, you
+        can use the downloadable package described later in this
+        section.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -21792,7 +21792,7 @@
 
     <para>
       MySQL has several different log files that can help you find out
-      what's going on inside <command>mysqld</command>:
+      what is going on inside <command>mysqld</command>:
     </para>
 
     <informaltable>
@@ -21884,7 +21884,7 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        If you don't specify <option>--log-error</option>, or (on
+        If you do not specify <option>--log-error</option>, or (on
         Windows) if you use the <option>--console</option> option,
         errors are written to stderr, the standard error output. Usually
         this is your terminal.
@@ -22028,7 +22028,7 @@
         all SQL commands that update data. If no
         <replaceable>file_name</replaceable> value is given, the default
         name is the name of the host machine followed by
-        <literal>-bin</literal>. If file name is given, but it doesn't
+        <literal>-bin</literal>. If file name is given, but it does not
         contain a path, the file is written in the data directory. It is
         recommended to specify a filename, see
         <xref linkend="open-bugs"/>, for the reason.
@@ -22124,7 +22124,7 @@
           <para>
             An example of what does not work as you might expect: If the
             server is started with
-            <literal>binlog-do-db=sales</literal>, and you do
+            <literal>binlog-do-db=sales</literal>, and you run
             <literal>USE prices; UPDATE sales.january SET
             amount=amount+1000;</literal>, this statement is
             <emphasis>not</emphasis> written into the binary log.
@@ -22147,7 +22147,7 @@
           <para>
             An example of what does not work as you might expect: If the
             server is started with
-            <literal>binlog-ignore-db=sales</literal>, and you do
+            <literal>binlog-ignore-db=sales</literal>, and you run
             <literal>USE prices; UPDATE sales.january SET
             amount=amount+1000;</literal>, this statement
             <emphasis>is</emphasis> written into the binary log.
@@ -22570,7 +22570,7 @@
         MySQL Server can create a number of different log files that
         make it easy to see what is going on. See
         <xref linkend="log-files"/>. However, you must clean up these
-        files regularly to ensure that the logs don't take up too much
+        files regularly to ensure that the logs do not take up too much
         disk space.
       </para>
 
@@ -22815,8 +22815,8 @@
 
     <para>
       For better performance, you can specify the following options
-      differently for each server, to spread the load between physical
-      disks:
+      differently for each server, to spread the load between several
+      physical disks:
     </para>
 
     <itemizedlist>
@@ -22848,10 +22848,10 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      <emphasis role="bold">Warning:</emphasis> Normally you should
+      <emphasis role="bold">Warning</emphasis>: Normally you should
       never have two servers that update data in the same databases.
       This may lead to unpleasant surprises if your operating system
-      doesn't support fault-free system locking. If (despite this
+      does not support fault-free system locking. If (despite this
       warning) you run multiple servers using the same data directory
       and they have logging enabled, you must use the appropriate
       options to specify log filenames that are unique to each server.
@@ -22879,9 +22879,9 @@
 
       <listitem>
         <para>
-          Another risk with NFS is that you must come up with a way to
-          make sure that two or more servers do not interfere with each
-          other. Usually NFS file locking is handled by the
+          Another risk with NFS is that you must devise a way to ensure
+          that two or more servers do not interfere with each other.
+          Usually NFS file locking is handled by the
           <literal>lockd</literal> daemon, but at the moment there is no
           platform that performs locking 100% reliably in every
           situation.
@@ -22954,8 +22954,8 @@
         <para>
           To start multiple servers manually from the command line, you
           can specify the appropriate options on the command line or in
-          an option file. It's more convenient to place the options in
-          an option file, but it's necessary to make sure that each
+          an option file. It is more convenient to place the options in
+          an option file, but it is necessary to make sure that each
           server gets its own set of options. To do this, create an
           option file for each server and tell the server the filename
           with a <option>--defaults-file</option> option when you run
@@ -23003,8 +23003,8 @@
 
         <para>
           On NT, each server starts in the foreground (no new prompt
-          appears until the server exits later), so you'll need to issue
-          those two commands in separate console windows.
+          appears until the server exits later), so you will need to
+          issue those two commands in separate console windows.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -23310,11 +23310,10 @@
       <para>
         The easiest way is to run multiple servers on Unix is to compile
         them with different TCP/IP ports and Unix socket files so that
-        each one is listening on different network interfaces. Also, by
-        compiling in different base directories for each installation,
-        that automatically results in different compiled-in data
-        directory, log file, and PID file locations for each of your
-        servers.
+        each one is listening on different network interfaces. Compiling
+        in different base directories for each installation also results
+        automatically in a separate, compiled-in data directory, log
+        file, and PID file location for each server.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -23435,7 +23434,7 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        For automatic server execution, your startup script that is
+        For automatic server execution, the startup script that is
         executed at boot time should execute the following command once
         for each server with an appropriate option file path for each
         command:
@@ -23618,7 +23617,7 @@
 
     <para>
       The query cache is extremely useful in an environment where you
-      have tables that don't change very often and for which the server
+      have tables that do not change very often and for which the server
       receives many identical queries. This is a typical situation for
       many Web servers that generate many dynamic pages based on
       database content.
@@ -23632,13 +23631,13 @@
 
     <para>
       <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: The query cache does not
-      work in an environment where you have many
+      work in an environment where you have multiple
       <command>mysqld</command> servers updating the same
       <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables.
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: The query cache isn't used
+      <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: The query cache is not used
       for server-side prepared statements. If you're using server-side
       prepared statements consider that these statement won't be
       satisfied by the query cache. See
@@ -23646,7 +23645,7 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      Some performance data for the query cache follow. These results
+      Some performance data for the query cache follows. These results
       were generated by running the MySQL benchmark suite on a Linux
       Alpha 2 x 500MHz system with 2GB RAM and a 64MB query cache.
     </para>
@@ -23655,7 +23654,7 @@
 
       <listitem>
         <para>
-          If all the queries you're performing are simple (such as
+          If all the queries you are performing are simple (such as
           selecting a row from a table with one row), but still differ
           so that the queries cannot be cached, the overhead for having
           the query cache active is 13%. This could be regarded as the
@@ -23731,7 +23730,7 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        If a table changes, all cached queries using that table become
+        If a table changes, all cached queries that use the table become
         invalid and are removed from the cache. This includes queries
         that use <literal>MERGE</literal> tables that map to the changed
         table. A table can be changed by many types of statements, such
@@ -24257,12 +24256,12 @@
 
       <para>
         The information provided by the
-        <literal>Qcache_lowmem_prunes</literal> status variable can be
-        used to help you tune the query cache size. It counts the number
-        of queries that have been removed from the cache to free up
-        memory for caching new queries. The query cache uses a least
-        recently used (LRU) strategy to decide which queries to remove
-        from the cache. Tuning information is given in
+        <literal>Qcache_lowmem_prunes</literal> status variable can help
+        you tune the query cache size. It counts the number of queries
+        that have been removed from the cache to free up memory for
+        caching new queries. The query cache uses a least recently used
+        (LRU) strategy to decide which queries to remove from the cache.
+        Tuning information is given in
         <xref linkend="query-cache-configuration"/>.
       </para>
 

Modified: trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-29 05:00:39 UTC (rev 1097)
+++ trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-29 05:00:58 UTC (rev 1098)
@@ -1796,7 +1796,7 @@
               name for each new file. This works around a problem in the
               Linux kernel dealing with creating many new files with
               different names. With the old behavior, Linux seems to
-              <quote>leak</quote> memory, because it's being allocated
+              <quote>leak</quote> memory, because it is being allocated
               to the directory entry cache rather than to the disk
               cache.
             </para>
@@ -4066,7 +4066,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              You must increase this value if you are using big
+              You must increase this value if you are using large
               <literal>BLOB</literal> columns or long strings. It should
               be as big as the biggest <literal>BLOB</literal> you want
               to use. The protocol limit for
@@ -4149,7 +4149,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              Don't start more than this number of threads to handle
+              Do not start more than this number of threads to handle
               <literal>INSERT DELAYED</literal> statements. If you try
               to insert data into a new table after all <literal>INSERT
               DELAYED</literal> threads are in use, the row is inserted
@@ -4209,7 +4209,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              Don't allow <literal>SELECT</literal> statements that
+              Do not allow <literal>SELECT</literal> statements that
               probably need to examine more than
               <literal>max_join_size</literal> rows (for single-table
               statements) or row combinations (for multiple-table
@@ -4316,7 +4316,7 @@
 
             <para>
               The maximum number of temporary tables a client can keep
-              open at the same time. (This option doesn't yet do
+              open at the same time. (This option does not yet do
               anything.)
             </para>
           </listitem>
@@ -4864,7 +4864,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <remark>
-              It won't necessarily eliminate allocation completely;
+              It will not necessarily eliminate allocation completely;
               server *may* still allocate memory in some situations,
               e.g., transaction-related or sp-related ops.
             </remark>
@@ -7544,7 +7544,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              The number of tables that are currently open.
+              The number of tables that are open.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -8317,9 +8317,9 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              Don't print MySQL-specific column options in the output of
-              <literal>SHOW CREATE TABLE</literal>. This mode is used by
-              <command>mysqldump</command> in portability mode.
+              Do not print MySQL-specific column options in the output
+              of <literal>SHOW CREATE TABLE</literal>. This mode is used
+              by <command>mysqldump</command> in portability mode.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -8333,7 +8333,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              Don't print MySQL-specific index options in the output of
+              Do not print MySQL-specific index options in the output of
               <literal>SHOW CREATE TABLE</literal>. This mode is used by
               <command>mysqldump</command> in portability mode.
             </para>
@@ -8349,7 +8349,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              Don't print MySQL-specific table options (such as
+              Do not print MySQL-specific table options (such as
               <literal>ENGINE</literal>) in the output of <literal>SHOW
               CREATE TABLE</literal>. This mode is used by
               <command>mysqldump</command> in portability mode.
@@ -8366,7 +8366,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              In subtraction operations, don't mark the result as
+              In subtraction operations, do not mark the result as
               <literal>UNSIGNED</literal> if one of the operands is
               unsigned. Note that this makes <literal>BIGINT
               UNSIGNED</literal> not 100% usable in all contexts. See
@@ -11722,7 +11722,7 @@
                 If you get a connection and some garbage characters, the
                 port is open, and should be closed on your firewall or
                 router, unless you really have a good reason to keep it
-                open. If <literal>telnet</literal> hangs or the
+                open. If <command>telnet</command> hangs or the
                 connection is refused, the port is blocked, which is how
                 you want it to be.
               </para>
@@ -11760,8 +11760,7 @@
             ID='234'</literal>. If the user enters extra information, it
             all becomes part of the string. In a numeric context, MySQL
             automatically converts this string to a number and strips
-            any trailing non-numeric characters which the string may
-            contain.
+            any trailing non-numeric characters from it.
           </para>
 
           <para>
@@ -11921,8 +11920,8 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            Learn to use the <literal>tcpdump</literal> and
-            <literal>strings</literal> utilities. In most cases, you can
+            Learn to use the <command>tcpdump</command> and
+            <command>strings</command> utilities. In most cases, you can
             check whether MySQL data streams are unencrypted by issuing
             a command like the following:
           </para>
@@ -11964,7 +11963,7 @@
         connection. Password handling during the client connection
         sequence was upgraded in MySQL 4.1.1 to be very secure. If you
         are still using pre-4.1.1-style passwords, the encryption
-        algorithm is not as strong as the newer algorithmm With some
+        algorithm is not as strong as the newer algorithm. With some
         effort, a clever attacker who can sniff the traffic between the
         client and the server can crack the password. (See
         <xref linkend="password-hashing"/>, for a discussion of the
@@ -12029,7 +12028,7 @@
 
           <para>
             <command>mysqld</command> can (and should) be run as an
-            ordinary unprivileged user instead. You can create a
+            ordinary, unprivileged user instead. You can create a
             separate Unix account named <literal>mysql</literal> to make
             everything even more secure. Use this account only for
             administering MySQL. To start <command>mysqld</command> as a
@@ -12057,8 +12056,9 @@
             Running <command>mysqld</command> as a Unix user other than
             <literal>root</literal> does not mean that you need to
             change the <literal>root</literal> username in the
-            <literal>user</literal> table. Usernames for MySQL accounts
-            have nothing to do with usernames for Unix accounts.
+            <literal>user</literal> table. <emphasis>Usernames for MySQL
+            accounts have nothing to do with usernames for Unix
+            accounts</emphasis>.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -12117,7 +12117,7 @@
             Do not grant the <literal>FILE</literal> privilege to
             non-administrative users. Any user that has this privilege
             can write a file anywhere in the filesystem with the
-            privileges of the <command>mysqld</command> daemon! To make
+            privileges of the <command>mysqld</command> daemon. To make
             this a bit safer, files generated with <literal>SELECT ...
             INTO OUTFILE</literal> do not overwrite existing files and
             are writable by everyone.
@@ -12140,17 +12140,17 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            If you don't trust your DNS, you should use IP numbers
+            If you do not trust your DNS, you should use IP numbers
             rather than hostnames in the grant tables. In any case, you
             should be very careful about creating grant table entries
-            using hostname values that contain wildcards!
+            using hostname values that contain wildcards.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            If you want to restrict the number of connections allowed
-            for a single account, you can do so by setting the
+            If you want to restrict the number of connections allowed to
+            a single account, you can do so by setting the
             <literal>max_user_connections</literal> variable in
             <command>mysqld</command>. The <literal>GRANT</literal>
             statement also supports resource control options for
@@ -12258,7 +12258,7 @@
 </programlisting>
 
           <para>
-            This ensures that the user can't change any privilege
+            This ensures that the user cannot change any privilege
             columns directly, but has to use the
             <literal>GRANT</literal> statement to give privileges to
             other users.
@@ -12405,7 +12405,7 @@
         <listitem>
           <para>
             By default, all MySQL clients and libraries in binary
-            distributions are now compiled with the
+            distributions are compiled with the
             <option>--enable-local-infile</option> option, to be
             compatible with MySQL 3.23.48 and before.
           </para>
@@ -15126,7 +15126,7 @@
         If you change the grant tables directly but forget to reload
         them, your changes have <emphasis>no effect</emphasis> until you
         restart the server. This may leave you wondering why your
-        changes don't seem to make any difference!
+        changes do not seem to make any difference!
       </para>
 
     </section>
@@ -15186,7 +15186,7 @@
           <para>
             The grant tables must be properly set up so that the server
             can use them for access control. For some distribution types
-            (such as binary distributions on Windows or RPM
+            (such as binary distributions on Windows, or RPM
             distributions on Linux), the installation process
             initializes the <literal>mysql</literal> database containing
             the grant tables. For distributions that do not do this, you
@@ -15280,7 +15280,7 @@
         <listitem>
           <para>
             If you try to connect as <literal>root</literal> and get the
-            following error, it means that you don't have a row in the
+            following error, it means that you do not have a row in the
             <literal>user</literal> table with a <literal>User</literal>
             column value of <literal>'root'</literal> and that
             <command>mysqld</command> cannot resolve the hostname for
@@ -15516,7 +15516,7 @@
             upgrade your operating system or <literal>glibc</literal>,
             or download a source distribution of MySQL version and
             compile it yourself. A source RPM is normally trivial to
-            compile and install, so this isn't a big problem.
+            compile and install, so this is not a big problem.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -15651,7 +15651,7 @@
             <replaceable>user_name</replaceable></literal> works when
             executed on the server host, but <literal>mysql -h
             <replaceable>host_name</replaceable> -u
-            <replaceable>user_name</replaceable></literal> doesn't work
+            <replaceable>user_name</replaceable></literal> does not work
             when executed on a remote client host, you have not enabled
             access to the server for the given username from the remote
             host.
@@ -15660,7 +15660,7 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            If you can't figure out why you get <literal>Access
+            If you cannot figure out why you get <literal>Access
             denied</literal>, remove from the <literal>user</literal>
             table all entries that have <literal>Host</literal> values
             containing wildcards (entries that contain
@@ -15671,7 +15671,7 @@
             <literal>User</literal>=<literal>'<replaceable>some_user</replaceable>'</literal>,
             thinking that this allows you to specify
             <literal>localhost</literal> to connect from the same
-            machine. The reason that this doesn't work is that the
+            machine. The reason that this does not work is that the
             default privileges include an entry with
             <literal>Host</literal>=<literal>'localhost'</literal> and
             <literal>User</literal>=<literal>''</literal>. Because that
@@ -15715,7 +15715,7 @@
             <literal>Access denied</literal> message whenever you issue
             a <literal>SELECT ... INTO OUTFILE</literal> or
             <literal>LOAD DATA INFILE</literal> statement, your entry in
-            the <literal>user</literal> table doesn't have the
+            the <literal>user</literal> table does not have the
             <literal>FILE</literal> privilege enabled.
           </para>
         </listitem>
@@ -16547,10 +16547,10 @@
             username to be specified with a <option>-u</option> or
             <option>--user</option> option. Because this means that
             anyone can attempt to connect to the server using any
-            username, you can't make a database secure in any way unless
-            all MySQL accounts have passwords. Anyone who specifies a
-            username for an account that has no password is able to
-            connect successfully to the server.
+            username, you cannot make a database secure in any way
+            unless all MySQL accounts have passwords. Anyone who
+            specifies a username for an account that has no password is
+            able to connect successfully to the server.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -17603,7 +17603,7 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            Use a <option>-p</option> or <option>--password</option>
+            Use the <option>-p</option> or <option>--password</option>
             option with no password value specified. In this case, the
             client program solicits the password from the terminal:
           </para>
@@ -17628,7 +17628,7 @@
             non-interactively, there is no opportunity to enter the
             password from the terminal. On some systems, you may even
             find that the first line of your script is read and
-            interpreted (incorrectly) as your password!
+            interpreted (incorrectly) as your password.
           </para>
 
           <indexterm type="type">
@@ -17741,9 +17741,9 @@
         <title>&title-secure-basics;</title>
 
         <para>
-          To understand how MySQL uses SSL, it's necessary to explain
+          To understand how MySQL uses SSL, it is necessary to explain
           some basic SSL and X509 concepts. People who are familiar with
-          them can skip this part.
+          these can skip this part of the discussion.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -18293,7 +18293,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              Note that use of <option>--ssl</option> doesn't
+              Note that use of <option>--ssl</option> does not
               <emphasis>require</emphasis> an SSL connection. For
               example, if the server or client is compiled without SSL
               support, a normal unencrypted connection is used.
@@ -18406,7 +18406,7 @@
 
             <para>
               Install an SSH client on your Windows machine. As a user,
-              the best non-free one I've found is from
+              the best non-free one I have found is from
               <literal>SecureCRT</literal> from
               <ulink url="http://www.vandyke.com/"/>. Another option is
               <literal>f-secure</literal> from
@@ -18442,8 +18442,8 @@
 
           <listitem>
             <para>
-              Save everything, otherwise you'll have to redo it the next
-              time.
+              Save everything, otherwise you will have to redo it the
+              next time.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -18488,8 +18488,8 @@
     <title>&title-disaster-prevention;</title>
 
     <remark role="todo">
-      a lot of the information here assumes MyISAM implicitly and won't
-      necessarily work for other storage engines.
+      a lot of the information here assumes MyISAM implicitly and will
+      not necessarily work for other storage engines.
     </remark>
 
     <para>
@@ -18547,7 +18547,7 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            Do a full backup of your database:
+            Create a full backup of your database:
           </para>
 
 <programlisting>
@@ -18583,7 +18583,7 @@
               <secondary>names</secondary>
             </indexterm>
 
-            Stop <command>mysqld</command> if it's running, then start
+            Stop <command>mysqld</command> if it is running, then start
             it with the
             <option>--log-bin[=<replaceable>file_name</replaceable>]</option>
             option. See <xref linkend="binary-log"/>. The binary log
@@ -18596,7 +18596,7 @@
       </orderedlist>
 
       <para>
-        For <literal>InnoDB</literal> tables, it's possible to perform
+        For <literal>InnoDB</literal> tables, it is possible to perform
         an online backup that takes no locks on tables; see
         <xref linkend="mysqldump"/>.
       </para>
@@ -18678,7 +18678,7 @@
       </orderedlist>
 
       <para>
-        You can also do selective backups of individual files:
+        You can also make selective backups of individual files:
       </para>
 
       <itemizedlist>
@@ -18694,9 +18694,9 @@
         <listitem>
           <para>
             To reload the table, use <literal>LOAD DATA INFILE
-            '<replaceable>file_name</replaceable>' REPLACE ...</literal>
-            To avoid duplicate rows, the table must have a
-            <literal>PRIMARY KEY</literal> or a
+            '<replaceable>file_name</replaceable>' REPLACE
+            ...</literal>. To avoid duplicate rows, the table must have
+            a <literal>PRIMARY KEY</literal> or a
             <literal>UNIQUE</literal> index. The
             <literal>REPLACE</literal> keyword causes old rows to be
             replaced with new ones when a new row duplicates an old row
@@ -18803,11 +18803,11 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        We'll assume that data is stored in MySQL's
-        <literal>InnoDB</literal> storage engine, which has support for
-        transactions and automatic crash recovery. We'll always assume
-        that the MySQL server is under load at the time of crash. If it
-        were not, no recovery would ever be needed.
+        We assume that data is stored in the <literal>InnoDB</literal>
+        storage engine, which has support for transactions and automatic
+        crash recovery. We also assume that the MySQL server is under
+        load at the time of the crash. If it were not, no recovery would
+        ever be needed.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -18819,9 +18819,9 @@
         and non-committed transactions that have not been flushed to the
         data files. <literal>InnoDB</literal> automatically rolls back
         those transactions that were not committed, and flushes to its
-        data files those that were. Information about this recovery
-        process is conveyed to the user through the MySQL error log. The
-        following is an example log excerpt:
+        data files those that were committed. Information about this
+        recovery process is conveyed to the user through the MySQL error
+        log. The following is an example log excerpt:
       </para>
 
 <programlisting>
@@ -18849,16 +18849,15 @@
 </programlisting>
 
       <para>
-        In cases of filesystem crashes or hardware problems, we can
+        For the cases of filesystem crashes or hardware problems, we can
         assume that the MySQL disk data is <emphasis>not</emphasis>
         available after a restart. This means that MySQL fails to start
         successfully because some blocks of disk data are no longer
-        readable. In this case, it's necessary to reformat the disk,
+        readable. In this case, it is necessary to reformat the disk,
         install a new one, or otherwise correct the underlying problem.
-        Then it's necessary to recover our MySQL data from backups,
+        Then it is necessary to recover our MySQL data from backups,
         which means that we must already have made backups. To make sure
-        that is the case, let's step back in time and design a backup
-        policy.
+        that is the case, we should design a backup policy.
       </para>
 
       <section id="backup-policy">
@@ -18904,10 +18903,10 @@
         </para>
 
         <para>
-          The resulting <filename>.sql</filename> file produced by the
-          <command>mysqldump</command> command contains a set of SQL
+          The resulting <filename>.sql</filename> file produced by
+          <command>mysqldump</command> contains a set of SQL
           <literal>INSERT</literal> statements that can be used to
-          reload the dumped tables later.
+          reload the dumped tables at a later time.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -18915,8 +18914,8 @@
           convenient. They produce large backup files and take time to
           generate. They are not optimal in the sense that each
           successive full backup includes all data, even that part that
-          didn't change since the previous full backup. After we have
-          made an initial full backup, it is more efficient to make
+          has not changed since the previous full backup. After we have
+          made the initial full backup, it is more efficient to make
           incremental backups. They are smaller and take less time to
           produce. The tradeoff is that, at recovery time, you cannot
           restore your data just by reloading the full backup. You must
@@ -18930,10 +18929,10 @@
           <option>--log-bin</option> option so that it stores these
           changes in a file while it updates data. This option enables
           binary logging, so that the server writes each SQL statement
-          that updates data into a file called a MySQL binary log. Let's
-          look at the data directory of a MySQL server that was started
-          with the <option>--log-bin</option> option and that has been
-          running for some days. We find these MySQL binary log files:
+          Looking at the data directory of a MySQL server that was
+          started with the <option>--log-bin</option> option and that
+          has been running for some days, we find these MySQL binary log
+          files:
         </para>
 
 <programlisting>
@@ -19344,7 +19343,7 @@
 
       <para>
         Even though table repair with <command>myisamchk</command> is
-        quite secure, it's always a good idea to make a backup
+        quite secure, it is always a good idea to make a backup
         <emphasis>before</emphasis> doing a repair (or any maintenance
         operation that could make a lot of changes to a table)
       </para>
@@ -19435,18 +19434,18 @@
 
         <para>
           If you run <command>mysqld</command> with external locking
-          disabled (which is the default as of MySQL 4.0), you can't
+          disabled (which is the default as of MySQL 4.0), you cannot
           reliably use <command>myisamchk</command> to check a table
           when <command>mysqld</command> is using the same table. If you
           can be sure that no one is accessing the tables through
           <command>mysqld</command> while you run
           <command>myisamchk</command>, you only have to do
           <command>mysqladmin flush-tables</command> before you start
-          checking the tables. If you can't guarantee this, then you
+          checking the tables. If you cannot guarantee this, then you
           must stop <command>mysqld</command> while you check the
           tables. If you run <command>myisamchk</command> while
           <command>mysqld</command> is updating the tables, you may get
-          a warning that a table is corrupt even when it isn't.
+          a warning that a table is corrupt even when it is not.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -19471,8 +19470,8 @@
 
         <para>
           This section describes how to check for and deal with data
-          corruption in MySQL databases. If your tables get corrupted
-          frequently you should try to find the reason why. See
+          corruption in MySQL databases. If your tables become corrupted
+          frequently, you should try to find the reason why. See
           <xref linkend="crashing"/>.
         </para>
 
@@ -19578,7 +19577,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              This finds 99.99% of all errors. What it can't find is
+              This finds 99.99% of all errors. What it cannot find is
               corruption that involves <emphasis>only</emphasis> the
               data file (which is very unusual). If you want to check a
               table, you should normally run
@@ -19632,8 +19631,8 @@
 
             <para>
               Like the previous command, but the <option>-i</option>
-              option tells <command>myisamchk</command> to print some
-              informational statistics, too.
+              option tells <command>myisamchk</command> to print
+              additional statistical information.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -19755,9 +19754,8 @@
 </programlisting>
 
         <para>
-          If you don't know the current table option values, use
-          <literal>SHOW CREATE TABLE</literal> or
-          <literal>DESCRIBE</literal>.
+          If you do not know the current table option values, use
+          <literal>SHOW CREATE TABLE</literal>.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -19822,9 +19820,9 @@
         </para>
 
         <para>
-          If you get weird errors when checking (such as <literal>out of
-          memory</literal> errors), or if <command>myisamchk</command>
-          crashes, go to Stage 3.
+          If you get strange errors when checking (such as <literal>out
+          of memory</literal> errors), or if
+          <command>myisamchk</command> crashes, go to Stage 3.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -19876,7 +19874,7 @@
               --safe-recover
               <replaceable>tbl_name</replaceable></command>. Safe
               recovery mode uses an old recovery method that handles a
-              few cases that regular recovery mode doesn't (but is
+              few cases that regular recovery mode does not (but is
               slower).
             </para>
           </listitem>
@@ -19884,7 +19882,7 @@
         </orderedlist>
 
         <para>
-          If you get weird errors when repairing (such as <literal>out
+          If you get strange errors when repairing (such as <literal>out
           of memory</literal> errors), or if
           <command>myisamchk</command> crashes, go to Stage 3.
         </para>
@@ -19896,7 +19894,7 @@
         <para>
           You should reach this stage only if the first 16KB block in
           the index file is destroyed or contains incorrect information,
-          or if the index file is missing. In this case, it's necessary
+          or if the index file is missing. In this case, it is necessary
           to create a new index file. Do so as follows:
         </para>
 
@@ -19904,7 +19902,7 @@
 
           <listitem>
             <para>
-              Move the data file to some safe place.
+              Move the data file to a safe place.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -19935,7 +19933,7 @@
 
         <para>
           Go back to Stage 2. <command>myisamchk -r -q</command> should
-          work. (This shouldn't be an endless loop.)
+          work. (This should not be an endless loop.)
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -19952,7 +19950,7 @@
         <para>
           You should reach this stage only if the
           <filename>.frm</filename> description file has also crashed.
-          That should never happen, because the description file isn't
+          That should never happen, because the description file is not
           changed after the table is created:
         </para>
 
@@ -19969,7 +19967,7 @@
 
           <listitem>
             <para>
-              If you don't have a backup but know exactly how the table
+              If you do not have a backup but know exactly how the table
               was created, create a copy of the table in another
               database. Remove the new data file, then move the
               <filename>.frm</filename> description and
@@ -20049,7 +20047,7 @@
         </itemizedlist>
 
         <para>
-          For a full description of these options, see
+          For a full description of all available options, see
           <xref linkend="myisamchk"/>.
         </para>
 
@@ -20093,7 +20091,7 @@
         </indexterm>
 
         <para>
-          It's also a good idea to check tables when the server starts.
+          It is also a good idea to check tables when the server starts.
           For example, whenever the machine has done a restart in the
           middle of an update, you usually need to check all the tables
           that could have been affected. (These are <quote>expected
@@ -20179,7 +20177,8 @@
 
         <para>
           To obtain a description of a table or statistics about it, use
-          the commands shown here:
+          the commands shown here. We explain some of the information in
+          more detail later.
         </para>
 
         <itemizedlist>
@@ -20196,7 +20195,7 @@
               you start the MySQL server with external locking disabled,
               <command>myisamchk</command> may report an error for a
               table that is updated while it runs. However, because
-              <command>myisamchk</command> doesn't change the table in
+              <command>myisamchk</command> does not change the table in
               describe mode, there is no risk of destroying data.
             </para>
           </listitem>
@@ -20601,7 +20600,7 @@
                 </para>
 
                 <para>
-                  Where in the row this index part starts.
+                  Where in the row this portion of the index starts.
                 </para>
               </listitem>
 
@@ -20611,11 +20610,11 @@
                 </para>
 
                 <para>
-                  How long this index part is. For packed numbers, this
-                  should always be the full length of the column. For
-                  strings, it may be shorter than the full length of the
-                  indexed column, because you can index a prefix of a
-                  string column.
+                  How long this portion of the index is. For packed
+                  numbers, this should always be the full length of the
+                  column. For strings, it may be shorter than the full
+                  length of the indexed column, because you can index a
+                  prefix of a string column.
                 </para>
               </listitem>
 
@@ -20626,8 +20625,8 @@
 
                 <para>
                   Whether a key value can exist multiple times in the
-                  index. Values are <literal>unique</literal> or
-                  <literal>multip.</literal> (multiple).
+                  index. Possible values are <literal>unique</literal>
+                  or <literal>multip.</literal> (multiple).
                 </para>
               </listitem>
 
@@ -20637,9 +20636,9 @@
                 </para>
 
                 <para>
-                  What data type this index part has. This is a
-                  <literal>MyISAM</literal> data type with the options
-                  <literal>packed</literal>,
+                  What data type this portion of the index has. This is
+                  a <literal>MyISAM</literal> data type with the
+                  possible values <literal>packed</literal>,
                   <literal>stripped</literal>, or
                   <literal>empty</literal>.
                 </para>
@@ -20800,7 +20799,7 @@
               Average number of blocks per row (that is, how many links
               a fragmented row is composed of). This is always 1.0 for
               fixed-format tables. This value should stay as close to
-              1.0 as possible. If it gets too big, you can reorganize
+              1.0 as possible. If it gets too large, you can reorganize
               the table. See <xref linkend="optimization"/>.
             </para>
           </listitem>
@@ -20811,8 +20810,8 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              How many blocks (links) are used. For fixed format, this
-              is the same as the number of rows.
+              How many blocks (links) are used. For fixed-format tables,
+              this is the same as the number of rows.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20971,7 +20970,7 @@
       <para>
         When a client connects to a MySQL server, the server indicates
         to the client what the server's default character set is. The
-        client switches to use this character set for this connection.
+        client switches to this character set for this connection.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -21168,7 +21167,7 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        In the following procedures, the name of your character set is
+        In the following procedures, the name of the character set is
         represented by <replaceable>MYSET</replaceable>.
       </para>
 
@@ -21243,7 +21242,7 @@
             Add the character set name to the
             <literal>CHARSETS_AVAILABLE</literal> and
             <literal>COMPILED_CHARSETS</literal> lists in
-            <literal>configure.in</literal>.
+            <filename>configure.in</filename>.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -21423,7 +21422,7 @@
         <literal>to_lower[]</literal>, <literal>to_upper[]</literal>,
         and <literal>sort_order[]</literal> are indexed by character
         value, but <literal>ctype[]</literal> is indexed by character
-        value + 1. This is an old legacy convention to be able to handle
+        value + 1. This is an old legacy convention for handling
         <literal>EOF</literal>.)
       </para>
 
@@ -21559,7 +21558,7 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            The character set is a multi-byte character set that can't
+            The character set is a multi-byte character set that cannot
             be loaded dynamically. In this case, you must recompile the
             program with support for the character set.
           </para>
@@ -21571,7 +21570,7 @@
           </remark>
 
           <para>
-            The character set is a dynamic character set, but you don't
+            The character set is a dynamic character set, but you do not
             have a configure file for it. In this case, you should
             install the configure file for the character set from a new
             MySQL distribution.
@@ -21580,7 +21579,7 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            If your <filename>Index</filename> file doesn't contain the
+            If your <filename>Index</filename> file does not contain the
             name for the character set, your program displays the
             following error message:
           </para>
@@ -21695,14 +21694,15 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        If your system has its own zoneinfo database (the set of files
-        describing time zones), you should use the
-        <command>mysql_tzinfo_to_sql</command> program for filling the
-        time zone tables. Examples of such systems are Linux, FreeBSD,
-        Sun Solaris, and Mac OS X. One likely location for these files
-        is the <filename>/usr/share/zoneinfo</filename> directory. If
-        your system does not have a zoneinfo database, you can use the
-        downloadable package described later in this section.
+        If your system has its own <firstterm>zoneinfo</firstterm>
+        database (the set of files describing time zones), you should
+        use the <command>mysql_tzinfo_to_sql</command> program for
+        filling the time zone tables. Examples of such systems are
+        Linux, FreeBSD, Sun Solaris, and Mac OS X. One likely location
+        for these files is the <filename>/usr/share/zoneinfo</filename>
+        directory. If your system does not have a zoneinfo database, you
+        can use the downloadable package described later in this
+        section.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -21801,7 +21801,7 @@
 
     <para>
       MySQL has several different log files that can help you find out
-      what's going on inside <command>mysqld</command>:
+      what is going on inside <command>mysqld</command>:
     </para>
 
     <informaltable>
@@ -21893,7 +21893,7 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        If you don't specify <option>--log-error</option>, or (on
+        If you do not specify <option>--log-error</option>, or (on
         Windows) if you use the <option>--console</option> option,
         errors are written to stderr, the standard error output. Usually
         this is your terminal.
@@ -22037,7 +22037,7 @@
         all SQL commands that update data. If no
         <replaceable>file_name</replaceable> value is given, the default
         name is the name of the host machine followed by
-        <literal>-bin</literal>. If file name is given, but it doesn't
+        <literal>-bin</literal>. If file name is given, but it does not
         contain a path, the file is written in the data directory. It is
         recommended to specify a filename, see
         <xref linkend="open-bugs"/>, for the reason.
@@ -22133,7 +22133,7 @@
           <para>
             An example of what does not work as you might expect: If the
             server is started with
-            <literal>binlog-do-db=sales</literal>, and you do
+            <literal>binlog-do-db=sales</literal>, and you run
             <literal>USE prices; UPDATE sales.january SET
             amount=amount+1000;</literal>, this statement is
             <emphasis>not</emphasis> written into the binary log.
@@ -22156,7 +22156,7 @@
           <para>
             An example of what does not work as you might expect: If the
             server is started with
-            <literal>binlog-ignore-db=sales</literal>, and you do
+            <literal>binlog-ignore-db=sales</literal>, and you run
             <literal>USE prices; UPDATE sales.january SET
             amount=amount+1000;</literal>, this statement
             <emphasis>is</emphasis> written into the binary log.
@@ -22579,7 +22579,7 @@
         MySQL Server can create a number of different log files that
         make it easy to see what is going on. See
         <xref linkend="log-files"/>. However, you must clean up these
-        files regularly to ensure that the logs don't take up too much
+        files regularly to ensure that the logs do not take up too much
         disk space.
       </para>
 
@@ -22824,8 +22824,8 @@
 
     <para>
       For better performance, you can specify the following options
-      differently for each server, to spread the load between physical
-      disks:
+      differently for each server, to spread the load between several
+      physical disks:
     </para>
 
     <itemizedlist>
@@ -22857,10 +22857,10 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      <emphasis role="bold">Warning:</emphasis> Normally you should
+      <emphasis role="bold">Warning</emphasis>: Normally you should
       never have two servers that update data in the same databases.
       This may lead to unpleasant surprises if your operating system
-      doesn't support fault-free system locking. If (despite this
+      does not support fault-free system locking. If (despite this
       warning) you run multiple servers using the same data directory
       and they have logging enabled, you must use the appropriate
       options to specify log filenames that are unique to each server.
@@ -22888,9 +22888,9 @@
 
       <listitem>
         <para>
-          Another risk with NFS is that you must come up with a way to
-          make sure that two or more servers do not interfere with each
-          other. Usually NFS file locking is handled by the
+          Another risk with NFS is that you must devise a way to ensure
+          that two or more servers do not interfere with each other.
+          Usually NFS file locking is handled by the
           <literal>lockd</literal> daemon, but at the moment there is no
           platform that performs locking 100% reliably in every
           situation.
@@ -22963,8 +22963,8 @@
         <para>
           To start multiple servers manually from the command line, you
           can specify the appropriate options on the command line or in
-          an option file. It's more convenient to place the options in
-          an option file, but it's necessary to make sure that each
+          an option file. It is more convenient to place the options in
+          an option file, but it is necessary to make sure that each
           server gets its own set of options. To do this, create an
           option file for each server and tell the server the filename
           with a <option>--defaults-file</option> option when you run
@@ -23012,8 +23012,8 @@
 
         <para>
           On NT, each server starts in the foreground (no new prompt
-          appears until the server exits later), so you'll need to issue
-          those two commands in separate console windows.
+          appears until the server exits later), so you will need to
+          issue those two commands in separate console windows.
         </para>
 
         <para>
@@ -23319,11 +23319,10 @@
       <para>
         The easiest way is to run multiple servers on Unix is to compile
         them with different TCP/IP ports and Unix socket files so that
-        each one is listening on different network interfaces. Also, by
-        compiling in different base directories for each installation,
-        that automatically results in different compiled-in data
-        directory, log file, and PID file locations for each of your
-        servers.
+        each one is listening on different network interfaces. Compiling
+        in different base directories for each installation also results
+        automatically in a separate, compiled-in data directory, log
+        file, and PID file location for each server.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -23444,7 +23443,7 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        For automatic server execution, your startup script that is
+        For automatic server execution, the startup script that is
         executed at boot time should execute the following command once
         for each server with an appropriate option file path for each
         command:
@@ -23627,7 +23626,7 @@
 
     <para>
       The query cache is extremely useful in an environment where you
-      have tables that don't change very often and for which the server
+      have tables that do not change very often and for which the server
       receives many identical queries. This is a typical situation for
       many Web servers that generate many dynamic pages based on
       database content.
@@ -23641,13 +23640,13 @@
 
     <para>
       <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: The query cache does not
-      work in an environment where you have many
+      work in an environment where you have multiple
       <command>mysqld</command> servers updating the same
       <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables.
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: The query cache isn't used
+      <emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>: The query cache is not used
       for server-side prepared statements. If you're using server-side
       prepared statements consider that these statement won't be
       satisfied by the query cache. See
@@ -23655,7 +23654,7 @@
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      Some performance data for the query cache follow. These results
+      Some performance data for the query cache follows. These results
       were generated by running the MySQL benchmark suite on a Linux
       Alpha 2 x 500MHz system with 2GB RAM and a 64MB query cache.
     </para>
@@ -23664,7 +23663,7 @@
 
       <listitem>
         <para>
-          If all the queries you're performing are simple (such as
+          If all the queries you are performing are simple (such as
           selecting a row from a table with one row), but still differ
           so that the queries cannot be cached, the overhead for having
           the query cache active is 13%. This could be regarded as the
@@ -23740,7 +23739,7 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        If a table changes, all cached queries using that table become
+        If a table changes, all cached queries that use the table become
         invalid and are removed from the cache. This includes queries
         that use <literal>MERGE</literal> tables that map to the changed
         table. A table can be changed by many types of statements, such
@@ -24256,12 +24255,12 @@
 
       <para>
         The information provided by the
-        <literal>Qcache_lowmem_prunes</literal> status variable can be
-        used to help you tune the query cache size. It counts the number
-        of queries that have been removed from the cache to free up
-        memory for caching new queries. The query cache uses a least
-        recently used (LRU) strategy to decide which queries to remove
-        from the cache. Tuning information is given in
+        <literal>Qcache_lowmem_prunes</literal> status variable can help
+        you tune the query cache size. It counts the number of queries
+        that have been removed from the cache to free up memory for
+        caching new queries. The query cache uses a least recently used
+        (LRU) strategy to decide which queries to remove from the cache.
+        Tuning information is given in
         <xref linkend="query-cache-configuration"/>.
       </para>
 

Thread
svn commit - mysqldoc@docsrva: r1098 - in trunk: . refman-4.1 refman-5.0 refman-5.1paul29 Jan