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From:paul Date:January 26 2006 4:31pm
Subject:svn commit - mysqldoc@docsrva: r1045 - in trunk: . refman-4.1 refman-5.0 refman-5.1
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Author: paul
Date: 2006-01-26 17:31:10 +0100 (Thu, 26 Jan 2006)
New Revision: 1045

Log:
 r2546@kite-hub:  paul | 2006-01-26 10:31:02 -0600
 General revisions.


Modified:
   trunk/
   trunk/refman-4.1/sql-syntax.xml
   trunk/refman-5.0/sql-syntax.xml
   trunk/refman-5.1/sql-syntax.xml


Property changes on: trunk
___________________________________________________________________
Name: svk:merge
   - b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:6690
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:2543
   + b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:6690
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:2546

Modified: trunk/refman-4.1/sql-syntax.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-4.1/sql-syntax.xml	2006-01-26 15:59:05 UTC (rev 1044)
+++ trunk/refman-4.1/sql-syntax.xml	2006-01-26 16:31:10 UTC (rev 1045)
@@ -1015,7 +1015,8 @@
         mapped to an <literal>ALTER TABLE</literal> statement to create
         indexes. See <xref linkend="alter-table"/>. The <literal>CREATE
         INDEX</literal> statement does not do anything prior to MySQL
-        3.22.
+        3.22. For more information about how MySQL uses indexes, see
+        <xref linkend="mysql-indexes"/>.
       </para>
 
       <remark role="help-description-end"/>
@@ -1060,12 +1061,12 @@
 </programlisting>
 
       <para>
-        Because most names usually differ in the first 10 characters,
-        this index should not be much slower than an index created from
-        the entire <literal>name</literal> column. Also, using partial
-        columns for indexes can make the index file much smaller, which
-        could save a lot of disk space and might also speed up
-        <literal>INSERT</literal> operations.
+        If names in the column usually differ in the first 10
+        characters, this index should not be much slower than an index
+        created from the entire <literal>name</literal> column. Also,
+        using partial columns for indexes can make the index file much
+        smaller, which could save a lot of disk space and might also
+        speed up <literal>INSERT</literal> operations.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -1074,8 +1075,10 @@
         limit is 255 bytes for all tables.) Note that prefix limits are
         measured in bytes, whereas the prefix length in <literal>CREATE
         INDEX</literal> statements is interpreted as number of
-        characters. Take this into account when specifying a prefix
-        length for a column that uses a multi-byte character set.
+        characters for non-binary data types (<literal>CHAR</literal>,
+        <literal>VARCHAR</literal>, <literal>TEXT</literal>). Take this
+        into account when specifying a prefix length for a column that
+        uses a multi-byte character set.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -1139,7 +1142,7 @@
       </informaltable>
 
       <para>
-        Example:
+        Examples:
       </para>
 
 <programlisting>
@@ -1167,11 +1170,6 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        For more information about how MySQL uses indexes, see
-        <xref linkend="mysql-indexes"/>.
-      </para>
-
-      <para>
         <literal>FULLTEXT</literal> indexes can include only
         <literal>CHAR</literal>, <literal>VARCHAR</literal>, and
         <literal>TEXT</literal> columns, and only in
@@ -1181,11 +1179,21 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        <literal>SPATIAL</literal> indexes can include only spatial
-        columns, and only in <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables.
+        <literal>FULLTEXT</literal> indexes are supported only for
+        <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables and can include only
+        <literal>CHAR</literal>, <literal>VARCHAR</literal>, and
+        <literal>TEXT</literal> columns. <literal>FULLTEXT</literal>
+        indexes are available in MySQL 3.23.23 or later. See
+        <xref linkend="fulltext-search"/>.
+      </para>
+
+      <para>
+        <literal>SPATIAL</literal> indexes are supported only for
+        <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables and can include only spatial
+        columns that are defined as <literal>NOT NULL</literal>.
         <literal>SPATIAL</literal> indexes are available in MySQL 4.1 or
-        later. Spatial data types are described in
-        <xref linkend="spatial-extensions"/>.
+        later. <xref linkend="spatial-extensions"/>, describes the
+        spatial data types.
       </para>
 
     </section>
@@ -1339,10 +1347,10 @@
         In MySQL 3.22 or later, the table name can be specified as
         <replaceable>db_name.tbl_name</replaceable> to create the table
         in a specific database. This works regardless of whether there
-        is a default database. If you use quoted identifiers, quote the
-        database and table names separately. For example,
-        <literal>`mydb`.`mytbl`</literal> is legal, but
-        <literal>`mydb.mytbl`</literal> is not.
+        is a default database, assuming that the database exists. If you
+        use quoted identifiers, quote the database and table names
+        separately. For example, <literal>`mydb`.`mytbl`</literal> is
+        legal, but <literal>`mydb.mytbl`</literal> is not.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -1354,20 +1362,21 @@
         without conflicting with each other or with an existing
         non-<literal>TEMPORARY</literal> table of the same name. (The
         existing table is hidden until the temporary table is dropped.)
-        From MySQL 4.0.2 on, you must have the <literal>CREATE TEMPORARY
-        TABLES</literal> privilege to create temporary tables.
+        From MySQL 4.0.2 on, to create temporary tables, you must have
+        the <literal>CREATE TEMPORARY TABLES</literal> privilege.
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        In MySQL 3.23 or later, you can use the keywords <literal>IF NOT
-        EXISTS</literal> so that an error does not occur if the table
-        exists. Note that there is no verification that the existing
+        In MySQL 3.23 or later, the keywords <literal>IF NOT
+        EXISTS</literal> prevent an error from occurring if the table
+        exists. However, there is no verification that the existing
         table has a structure identical to that indicated by the
         <literal>CREATE TABLE</literal> statement.
         <emphasis>Note</emphasis>: If you use <literal>IF NOT
         EXISTS</literal> in a <literal>CREATE TABLE ... SELECT</literal>
         statement, any rows selected by the <literal>SELECT</literal>
-        part are inserted whether or not the table already exists.
+        part are inserted regardless of whether the table already
+        exists.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -1406,14 +1415,17 @@
       </informaltable>
 
       <para>
-        The files created by each storage engine to represent tables are
-        described in <xref linkend="storage-engines"/>.
+        <xref linkend="storage-engines"/>, describes what files each
+        storage engine creates to represent tables.
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        For general information on the properties of the various column
-        types, see <xref linkend="data-types"/>. For information about
-        spatial data types, see <xref linkend="spatial-extensions"/>.
+        <replaceable>type</replaceable> represents the data type is a
+        column definition. <literal>spatial_type</literal> represents a
+        spatial data type. For general information on the properties of
+        data types other than the spatial types, see
+        <xref linkend="data-types"/>. For information about spatial data
+        types, see <xref linkend="spatial-extensions"/>.
       </para>
 
       <itemizedlist>
@@ -1438,22 +1450,24 @@
             <replaceable>value</replaceable> is the largest value for
             the column currently in the table.
             <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal> sequences begin with
-            <literal>1</literal>. Such a column must be defined as one
-            of the integer types as described in
-            <xref linkend="numeric-type-overview"/>. (The value 1.0 is
-            <emphasis role="bold">not</emphasis> an integer.) See
-            <xref linkend="mysql-insert-id"/>.
+            <literal>1</literal>.
           </para>
 
           <para>
-            As of MySQL 4.1.1, specifying the
-            <literal>NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO</literal> flag for the
-            <option>--sql-mode</option> server option or the
-            <literal>sql_mode</literal> system variable allows you to
-            store <literal>0</literal> in
+            To retrieve an <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal> value after
+            inserting a row, use the <literal>LAST_INSERT_ID()</literal>
+            SQL function or the <literal>mysql_insert_id()</literal> C
+            API function. See <xref linkend="information-functions"/>,
+            and <xref linkend="mysql-insert-id"/>.
+          </para>
+
+          <para>
+            As of MySQL 4.1.1, if the
+            <literal>NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO</literal> SQL mode is
+            enabled, you can store <literal>0</literal> in
             <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal> columns as
             <literal>0</literal> without generating a new sequence
-            value. See <xref linkend="server-options"/>.
+            value. See <xref linkend="server-sql-mode"/>.
           </para>
 
           <para>
@@ -1500,12 +1514,14 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            As of MySQL 4.1, character column definitions can include a
-            <literal>CHARACTER SET</literal> attribute to specify the
-            character set and, optionally, a collation for the column.
-            For details, see <xref linkend="charset"/>.
+            As of MySQL 4.1, character data types
+            (<literal>CHAR</literal>, <literal>VARCHAR</literal>,
+            <literal>TEXT</literal>) can include <literal>CHARACTER
+            SET</literal> and <literal>COLLATE</literal> attributes to
+            specify the character set and collation for the column. For
+            details, see <xref linkend="charset"/>.
             <literal>CHARSET</literal> is a synonym for
-            <literal>CHARACTER SET</literal>.
+            <literal>CHARACTER SET</literal>. Example:
           </para>
 
 <programlisting>

Modified: trunk/refman-5.0/sql-syntax.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.0/sql-syntax.xml	2006-01-26 15:59:05 UTC (rev 1044)
+++ trunk/refman-5.0/sql-syntax.xml	2006-01-26 16:31:10 UTC (rev 1045)
@@ -1047,7 +1047,8 @@
       <para>
         <literal>CREATE INDEX</literal> is mapped to an <literal>ALTER
         TABLE</literal> statement to create indexes. See
-        <xref linkend="alter-table"/>.
+        <xref linkend="alter-table"/>. For more information about how
+        MySQL uses indexes, see <xref linkend="mysql-indexes"/>.
       </para>
 
       <remark role="help-description-end"/>
@@ -1092,12 +1093,12 @@
 </programlisting>
 
       <para>
-        Because most names usually differ in the first 10 characters,
-        this index should not be much slower than an index created from
-        the entire <literal>name</literal> column. Also, using partial
-        columns for indexes can make the index file much smaller, which
-        could save a lot of disk space and might also speed up
-        <literal>INSERT</literal> operations.
+        If names in the column usually differ in the first 10
+        characters, this index should not be much slower than an index
+        created from the entire <literal>name</literal> column. Also,
+        using partial columns for indexes can make the index file much
+        smaller, which could save a lot of disk space and might also
+        speed up <literal>INSERT</literal> operations.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -1105,8 +1106,10 @@
         <literal>InnoDB</literal> tables). Note that prefix limits are
         measured in bytes, whereas the prefix length in <literal>CREATE
         INDEX</literal> statements is interpreted as number of
-        characters. Take this into account when specifying a prefix
-        length for a column that uses a multi-byte character set.
+        characters for non-binary data types (<literal>CHAR</literal>,
+        <literal>VARCHAR</literal>, <literal>TEXT</literal>). Take this
+        into account when specifying a prefix length for a column that
+        uses a multi-byte character set.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -1183,7 +1186,7 @@
       </informaltable>
 
       <para>
-        Example:
+        Examples:
       </para>
 
 <programlisting>
@@ -1211,23 +1214,19 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        For more information about how MySQL uses indexes, see
-        <xref linkend="mysql-indexes"/>.
-      </para>
-
-      <para>
-        <literal>FULLTEXT</literal> indexes can include only
+        <literal>FULLTEXT</literal> indexes are supported only for
+        <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables and can include only
         <literal>CHAR</literal>, <literal>VARCHAR</literal>, and
-        <literal>TEXT</literal> columns, and only in
-        <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables. See
+        <literal>TEXT</literal> columns. See
         <xref linkend="fulltext-search"/>.
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        <literal>SPATIAL</literal> indexes can include only spatial
-        columns, and only in <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables. Spatial
-        data types are described in
-        <xref linkend="spatial-extensions"/>.
+        <literal>SPATIAL</literal> indexes are supported only for
+        <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables and can include only spatial
+        columns that are defined as <literal>NOT NULL</literal>.
+        <xref linkend="spatial-extensions"/>, describes the spatial data
+        types.
       </para>
 
     </section>
@@ -1378,10 +1377,10 @@
         The table name can be specified as
         <replaceable>db_name.tbl_name</replaceable> to create the table
         in a specific database. This works regardless of whether there
-        is a default database. If you use quoted identifiers, quote the
-        database and table names separately. For example,
-        <literal>`mydb`.`mytbl`</literal> is legal, but
-        <literal>`mydb.mytbl`</literal> is not.
+        is a default database, assuming that the database exists. If you
+        use quoted identifiers, quote the database and table names
+        separately. For example, <literal>`mydb`.`mytbl`</literal> is
+        legal, but <literal>`mydb.mytbl`</literal> is not.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -1393,19 +1392,20 @@
         without conflicting with each other or with an existing
         non-<literal>TEMPORARY</literal> table of the same name. (The
         existing table is hidden until the temporary table is dropped.)
-        You must have the <literal>CREATE TEMPORARY TABLES</literal>
-        privilege to create temporary tables.
+        To create temporary tables, you must have the <literal>CREATE
+        TEMPORARY TABLES</literal> privilege.
       </para>
 
       <para>
         The keywords <literal>IF NOT EXISTS</literal> prevent an error
-        from occurring if the table exists. Note that there is no
+        from occurring if the table exists. However, there is no
         verification that the existing table has a structure identical
         to that indicated by the <literal>CREATE TABLE</literal>
         statement. <emphasis>Note</emphasis>: If you use <literal>IF NOT
         EXISTS</literal> in a <literal>CREATE TABLE ... SELECT</literal>
         statement, any rows selected by the <literal>SELECT</literal>
-        part are inserted whether or not the table already exists.
+        part are inserted regardless of whether the table already
+        exists.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -1444,14 +1444,17 @@
       </informaltable>
 
       <para>
-        The files created by each storage engine to represent tables are
-        described in <xref linkend="storage-engines"/>.
+        <xref linkend="storage-engines"/>, describes what files each
+        storage engine creates to represent tables.
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        For general information on the properties of the various column
-        types, see <xref linkend="data-types"/>. For information about
-        spatial data types, see <xref linkend="spatial-extensions"/>.
+        <replaceable>type</replaceable> represents the data type is a
+        column definition. <literal>spatial_type</literal> represents a
+        spatial data type. For general information on the properties of
+        data types other than the spatial types, see
+        <xref linkend="data-types"/>. For information about spatial data
+        types, see <xref linkend="spatial-extensions"/>.
       </para>
 
       <itemizedlist>
@@ -1476,21 +1479,23 @@
             <replaceable>value</replaceable> is the largest value for
             the column currently in the table.
             <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal> sequences begin with
-            <literal>1</literal>. Such a column must be defined as one
-            of the integer types as described in
-            <xref linkend="numeric-type-overview"/>. (The value 1.0 is
-            <emphasis role="bold">not</emphasis> an integer.) See
-            <xref linkend="mysql-insert-id"/>.
+            <literal>1</literal>.
           </para>
 
           <para>
-            Specifying the <literal>NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO</literal> flag
-            for the <option>--sql-mode</option> server option or the
-            <literal>sql_mode</literal> system variable allows you to
-            store <literal>0</literal> in
+            To retrieve an <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal> value after
+            inserting a row, use the <literal>LAST_INSERT_ID()</literal>
+            SQL function or the <literal>mysql_insert_id()</literal> C
+            API function. See <xref linkend="information-functions"/>,
+            and <xref linkend="mysql-insert-id"/>.
+          </para>
+
+          <para>
+            If the <literal>NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO</literal> SQL mode is
+            enabled, you can store <literal>0</literal> in
             <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal> columns as
             <literal>0</literal> without generating a new sequence
-            value. See <xref linkend="server-options"/>.
+            value. See <xref linkend="server-sql-mode"/>.
           </para>
 
           <para>
@@ -1536,12 +1541,13 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            Character column definitions can include a
-            <literal>CHARACTER SET</literal> attribute to specify the
-            character set and, optionally, a collation for the column.
-            For details, see <xref linkend="charset"/>.
-            <literal>CHARSET</literal> is a synonym for
-            <literal>CHARACTER SET</literal>.
+            Character data types (<literal>CHAR</literal>,
+            <literal>VARCHAR</literal>, <literal>TEXT</literal>) can
+            include <literal>CHARACTER SET</literal> and
+            <literal>COLLATE</literal> attributes to specify the
+            character set and collation for the column. For details, see
+            <xref linkend="charset"/>. <literal>CHARSET</literal> is a
+            synonym for <literal>CHARACTER SET</literal>. Example:
           </para>
 
 <programlisting>
@@ -1550,8 +1556,8 @@
 
           <para>
             MySQL &current-series; interprets length specifications in
-            character column definitions in characters. (Some earlier
-            versions interpreted them in bytes.)
+            character column definitions in characters. (Versions before
+            MySQL 4.1 interpreted them in bytes.)
           </para>
         </listitem>
 

Modified: trunk/refman-5.1/sql-syntax.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.1/sql-syntax.xml	2006-01-26 15:59:05 UTC (rev 1044)
+++ trunk/refman-5.1/sql-syntax.xml	2006-01-26 16:31:10 UTC (rev 1045)
@@ -1257,7 +1257,8 @@
       <para>
         <literal>CREATE INDEX</literal> is mapped to an <literal>ALTER
         TABLE</literal> statement to create indexes. See
-        <xref linkend="alter-table"/>.
+        <xref linkend="alter-table"/>. For more information about how
+        MySQL uses indexes, see <xref linkend="mysql-indexes"/>.
       </para>
 
       <remark role="help-description-end"/>
@@ -1302,12 +1303,12 @@
 </programlisting>
 
       <para>
-        Because most names usually differ in the first 10 characters,
-        this index should not be much slower than an index created from
-        the entire <literal>name</literal> column. Also, using partial
-        columns for indexes can make the index file much smaller, which
-        could save a lot of disk space and might also speed up
-        <literal>INSERT</literal> operations.
+        If names in the column usually differ in the first 10
+        characters, this index should not be much slower than an index
+        created from the entire <literal>name</literal> column. Also,
+        using partial columns for indexes can make the index file much
+        smaller, which could save a lot of disk space and might also
+        speed up <literal>INSERT</literal> operations.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -1315,8 +1316,10 @@
         <literal>InnoDB</literal> tables). Note that prefix limits are
         measured in bytes, whereas the prefix length in <literal>CREATE
         INDEX</literal> statements is interpreted as number of
-        characters. Take this into account when specifying a prefix
-        length for a column that uses a multi-byte character set.
+        characters for non-binary data types (<literal>CHAR</literal>,
+        <literal>VARCHAR</literal>, <literal>TEXT</literal>). Take this
+        into account when specifying a prefix length for a column that
+        uses a multi-byte character set.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -1393,7 +1396,7 @@
       </informaltable>
 
       <para>
-        Example:
+        Examples:
       </para>
 
 <programlisting>
@@ -1421,15 +1424,10 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        For more information about how MySQL uses indexes, see
-        <xref linkend="mysql-indexes"/>.
-      </para>
-
-      <para>
-        <literal>FULLTEXT</literal> indexes can include only
+        <literal>FULLTEXT</literal> indexes are supported only for
+        <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables and can include only
         <literal>CHAR</literal>, <literal>VARCHAR</literal>, and
-        <literal>TEXT</literal> columns, and only in
-        <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables. See
+        <literal>TEXT</literal> columns. See
         <xref linkend="fulltext-search"/>. A <literal>WITH
         PARSER</literal> clause can be specified to associate a parser
         plugin with the index if full-text indexing and searching
@@ -1439,10 +1437,11 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        <literal>SPATIAL</literal> indexes can include only spatial
-        columns, and only in <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables. Spatial
-        data types are described in
-        <xref linkend="spatial-extensions"/>.
+        <literal>SPATIAL</literal> indexes are supported only for
+        <literal>MyISAM</literal> tables and can include only spatial
+        columns that are defined as <literal>NOT NULL</literal>.
+        <xref linkend="spatial-extensions"/>, describes the spatial data
+        types.
       </para>
 
     </section>
@@ -1633,10 +1632,10 @@
         The table name can be specified as
         <replaceable>db_name.tbl_name</replaceable> to create the table
         in a specific database. This works regardless of whether there
-        is a default database. If you use quoted identifiers, quote the
-        database and table names separately. For example,
-        <literal>`mydb`.`mytbl`</literal> is legal, but
-        <literal>`mydb.mytbl`</literal> is not.
+        is a default database, assuming that the database exists. If you
+        use quoted identifiers, quote the database and table names
+        separately. For example, <literal>`mydb`.`mytbl`</literal> is
+        legal, but <literal>`mydb.mytbl`</literal> is not.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -1648,19 +1647,20 @@
         without conflicting with each other or with an existing
         non-<literal>TEMPORARY</literal> table of the same name. (The
         existing table is hidden until the temporary table is dropped.)
-        You must have the <literal>CREATE TEMPORARY TABLES</literal>
-        privilege to create temporary tables.
+        To create temporary tables, you must have the <literal>CREATE
+        TEMPORARY TABLES</literal> privilege.
       </para>
 
       <para>
         The keywords <literal>IF NOT EXISTS</literal> prevent an error
-        from occurring if the table exists. Note that there is no
+        from occurring if the table exists. However, there is no
         verification that the existing table has a structure identical
         to that indicated by the <literal>CREATE TABLE</literal>
         statement. <emphasis>Note</emphasis>: If you use <literal>IF NOT
         EXISTS</literal> in a <literal>CREATE TABLE ... SELECT</literal>
         statement, any rows selected by the <literal>SELECT</literal>
-        part are inserted whether or not the table already exists.
+        part are inserted regardless of whether the table already
+        exists.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -1699,14 +1699,17 @@
       </informaltable>
 
       <para>
-        The files created by each storage engine to represent tables are
-        described in <xref linkend="storage-engines"/>.
+        <xref linkend="storage-engines"/>, describes what files each
+        storage engine creates to represent tables.
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        For general information on the properties of the various column
-        types, see <xref linkend="data-types"/>. For information about
-        spatial data types, see <xref linkend="spatial-extensions"/>.
+        <replaceable>type</replaceable> represents the data type is a
+        column definition. <literal>spatial_type</literal> represents a
+        spatial data type. For general information on the properties of
+        data types other than the spatial types, see
+        <xref linkend="data-types"/>. For information about spatial data
+        types, see <xref linkend="spatial-extensions"/>.
       </para>
 
       <itemizedlist>
@@ -1731,21 +1734,23 @@
             <replaceable>value</replaceable> is the largest value for
             the column currently in the table.
             <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal> sequences begin with
-            <literal>1</literal>. Such a column must be defined as one
-            of the integer types as described in
-            <xref linkend="numeric-type-overview"/>. (The value 1.0 is
-            <emphasis role="bold">not</emphasis> an integer.) See
-            <xref linkend="mysql-insert-id"/>.
+            <literal>1</literal>.
           </para>
 
           <para>
-            Specifying the <literal>NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO</literal> flag
-            for the <option>--sql-mode</option> server option or the
-            <literal>sql_mode</literal> system variable allows you to
-            store <literal>0</literal> in
+            To retrieve an <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal> value after
+            inserting a row, use the <literal>LAST_INSERT_ID()</literal>
+            SQL function or the <literal>mysql_insert_id()</literal> C
+            API function. See <xref linkend="information-functions"/>,
+            and <xref linkend="mysql-insert-id"/>.
+          </para>
+
+          <para>
+            If the <literal>NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO</literal> SQL mode is
+            enabled, you can store <literal>0</literal> in
             <literal>AUTO_INCREMENT</literal> columns as
             <literal>0</literal> without generating a new sequence
-            value. See <xref linkend="server-options"/>.
+            value. See <xref linkend="server-sql-mode"/>.
           </para>
 
           <para>
@@ -1791,12 +1796,13 @@
 
         <listitem>
           <para>
-            Character column definitions can include a
-            <literal>CHARACTER SET</literal> attribute to specify the
-            character set and, optionally, a collation for the column.
-            For details, see <xref linkend="charset"/>.
-            <literal>CHARSET</literal> is a synonym for
-            <literal>CHARACTER SET</literal>.
+            Character data types (<literal>CHAR</literal>,
+            <literal>VARCHAR</literal>, <literal>TEXT</literal>) can
+            include <literal>CHARACTER SET</literal> and
+            <literal>COLLATE</literal> attributes to specify the
+            character set and collation for the column. For details, see
+            <xref linkend="charset"/>. <literal>CHARSET</literal> is a
+            synonym for <literal>CHARACTER SET</literal>. Example:
           </para>
 
 <programlisting>
@@ -1805,8 +1811,8 @@
 
           <para>
             MySQL &current-series; interprets length specifications in
-            character column definitions in characters. (Some earlier
-            versions interpreted them in bytes.)
+            character column definitions in characters. (Versions before
+            MySQL 4.1 interpreted them in bytes.)
           </para>
         </listitem>
 

Thread
svn commit - mysqldoc@docsrva: r1045 - in trunk: . refman-4.1 refman-5.0 refman-5.1paul26 Jan