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From:paul Date:January 23 2006 9:25pm
Subject:svn commit - mysqldoc@docsrva: r1000 - in trunk: . refman-4.1 refman-5.0 refman-5.1
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Author: paul
Date: 2006-01-23 22:25:36 +0100 (Mon, 23 Jan 2006)
New Revision: 1000

Log:
 r2443@kite-hub:  paul | 2006-01-23 12:41:15 -0600
 Cleanup edits.


Modified:
   trunk/
   trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml
   trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml
   trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml


Property changes on: trunk
___________________________________________________________________
Name: svk:merge
   - b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:6574
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:2442
   + b5ec3a16-e900-0410-9ad2-d183a3acac99:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:6574
bf112a9c-6c03-0410-a055-ad865cd57414:/mysqldoc-local/mysqldoc/trunk:2443

Modified: trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-23 21:25:22 UTC (rev 999)
+++ trunk/refman-4.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-23 21:25:36 UTC (rev 1000)
@@ -6633,7 +6633,7 @@
 | Bytes_received           | 155372598  |
 | Bytes_sent               | 1176560426 |
 | Connections              | 30023      |
-…
+...
 </programlisting>
 
         <para>
@@ -8874,7 +8874,7 @@
 
         <refsynopsisdiv>
           <cmdsynopsis>
-            <command>mysqld_multi [<replaceable>options</replaceable>] {start|stop|report} [<replaceable>GNR</replaceable>[,<replaceable>GNR</replaceable>] &hellip;]</command>
+            <command>mysqld_multi [<replaceable>options</replaceable>] {start|stop|report} [<replaceable>GNR</replaceable>[,<replaceable>GNR</replaceable>] ...]</command>
           </cmdsynopsis>
         </refsynopsisdiv>
 
@@ -9755,7 +9755,7 @@
             <literal>234 OR 1=1</literal> to cause the application to
             generate the query <literal>SELECT * FROM table WHERE ID=234
             OR 1=1</literal>. As a result, the server retrieves every
-            record in the table. This exposes every record and causes
+            row in the table. This exposes every row and causes
             excessive server load. The simplest way to protect from this
             type of attack is to use single quotes around the numeric
             constants: <literal>SELECT * FROM table WHERE
@@ -9768,12 +9768,12 @@
           <para>
             Sometimes people think that if a database contains only
             publicly available data, it need not be protected. This is
-            incorrect. Even if it is allowable to display any record in
-            the database, you should still protect against denial of
-            service attacks (for example, those that are based on the
-            technique in the preceding paragraph that causes the server
-            to waste resources). Otherwise, your server becomes
-            unresponsive to legitimate users.
+            incorrect. Even if it is allowable to display any row in the
+            database, you should still protect against denial of service
+            attacks (for example, those that are based on the technique
+            in the preceding paragraph that causes the server to waste
+            resources). Otherwise, your server becomes unresponsive to
+            legitimate users.
           </para>
 
           <para>
@@ -11961,9 +11961,9 @@
         (<literal>Host</literal>, <literal>User</literal>, and
         <literal>Password</literal>). The server accepts the connection
         only if the <literal>Host</literal> and <literal>User</literal>
-        columns in some <literal>user</literal> table record match the
+        columns in some <literal>user</literal> table row match the
         client hostname and username, and the client supplies the
-        password specified in that record.
+        password specified in that row.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -12071,7 +12071,7 @@
         <listitem>
           <para>
             A blank <literal>Host</literal> value in a
-            <literal>db</literal> table record means that its privileges
+            <literal>db</literal> table row means that its privileges
             should be combined with those in the row in the
             <literal>host</literal> table that matches the client
             hostname. The privileges are combined using an AND
@@ -12387,7 +12387,7 @@
         <literal><replaceable>user_name</replaceable>@<replaceable>host_name</replaceable></literal>
         format that indicates the <literal>User</literal> and
         <literal>Host</literal> values from the matching
-        <literal>user</literal> table record. Suppose that
+        <literal>user</literal> table row. Suppose that
         <literal>jeffrey</literal> connects and issues the following
         query:
       </para>
@@ -14713,9 +14713,9 @@
         <literal>dummy</literal> account, only the
         <literal>Host</literal>, <literal>User</literal>, and
         <literal>Password</literal> columns in the
-        <literal>user</literal> table record are assigned values. None
-        of the privilege columns are set explicitly, so MySQL assigns
-        them all the default value of <literal>'N'</literal>. This is
+        <literal>user</literal> table row are assigned values. None of
+        the privilege columns are set explicitly, so MySQL assigns them
+        all the default value of <literal>'N'</literal>. This is
         equivalent to what <literal>GRANT USAGE</literal> does.
       </para>
 
@@ -14984,7 +14984,7 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        An account in this context is a single record in the
+        An account in this context is a single row in the
         <literal>user</literal> table. Each account is uniquely
         identified by its <literal>User</literal> and
         <literal>Host</literal> column values.
@@ -15147,7 +15147,7 @@
 
       <para>
         The account for which this command resets the password is the
-        one with a <literal>user</literal> table record that matches
+        one with a <literal>user</literal> table row that matches
         <replaceable>user_name</replaceable> in the
         <literal>User</literal> column and the client host
         <emphasis>from which you connect</emphasis> in the
@@ -16492,12 +16492,12 @@
           <para>
             To reload the table, use and restore with <literal>LOAD DATA
             INFILE '<replaceable>file_name</replaceable>' REPLACE
-            ...</literal>. To avoid duplicate records, the table must
-            have a <literal>PRIMARY KEY</literal> or a
+            ...</literal>. To avoid duplicate rows, the table must have
+            a <literal>PRIMARY KEY</literal> or a
             <literal>UNIQUE</literal> index. The
-            <literal>REPLACE</literal> keyword causes old records to be
-            replaced with new ones when a new record duplicates an old
-            record on a unique key value.
+            <literal>REPLACE</literal> keyword causes old rows to be
+            replaced with new ones when a new row duplicates an old row
+            on a unique key value.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -17685,8 +17685,8 @@
               Use <command>myisamchk -r
               <replaceable>tbl_name</replaceable></command>
               (<option>-r</option> means <quote>recovery mode</quote>).
-              This removes incorrect and deleted records from the data
-              file and reconstructs the index file.
+              This removes incorrect and deleted rows from the data file
+              and reconstructs the index file.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -17826,8 +17826,8 @@
         </indexterm>
 
         <para>
-          To coalesce fragmented records and eliminate wasted space
-          resulting from deleting or updating records, run
+          To coalesce fragmented rows and eliminate wasted space
+          resulting from deleting or updating rows, run
           <command>myisamchk</command> in recovery mode:
         </para>
 
@@ -18309,7 +18309,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              How many records are in the table.
+              How many rows are in the table.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -18331,9 +18331,9 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              For dynamic record format, this indicates how many data
+              For dynamic-row format, this indicates how many data
               blocks there are. For an optimized table without
-              fragmented records, this is the same as <literal>Data
+              fragmented rows, this is the same as <literal>Data
               records</literal>.
             </para>
           </listitem>
@@ -18359,8 +18359,8 @@
               The size of the data file pointer, in bytes. It is usually
               2, 3, 4, or 5 bytes. Most tables manage with 2 bytes, but
               this cannot be controlled from MySQL yet. For fixed
-              tables, this is a record address. For dynamic tables, this
-              is a byte address.
+              tables, this is a row address. For dynamic tables, this is
+              a byte address.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -18403,7 +18403,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              How much space each record takes, in bytes.
+              How much space each row takes, in bytes.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -18449,7 +18449,7 @@
                 </para>
 
                 <para>
-                  Where in the record this portion of the index starts.
+                  Where in the row this portion of the index starts.
                 </para>
               </listitem>
 
@@ -18522,8 +18522,8 @@
 
                 <para>
                   This is a statistical value used by the optimizer. It
-                  tells how many records there are per value for this
-                  key. A unique key always has a value of 1. This may be
+                  tells how many rows there are per value for this key.
+                  A unique key always has a value of 1. This may be
                   updated after a table is loaded (or greatly changed)
                   with <command>myisamchk -a</command>. If this is not
                   updated at all, a default value of 30 is given.
@@ -18597,9 +18597,9 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              The average record length. This is the exact record length
-              for tables with fixed-length records, because all records
-              have the same length.
+              The average row length. This is the exact row length for
+              tables with fixed-length rows, because all rows have the
+              same length.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -18641,11 +18641,11 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              Average number of blocks per record (that is, how many
-              links a fragmented record is composed of). This is always
-              1.0 for fixed-format tables. This value should stay as
-              close to 1.0 as possible. If it gets too large, you can
-              reorganize the table. See <xref linkend="optimization"/>.
+              Average number of blocks per row (that is, how many links
+              a fragmented row is composed of). This is always 1.0 for
+              fixed-format tables. This value should stay as close to
+              1.0 as possible. If it gets too large, you can reorganize
+              the table. See <xref linkend="optimization"/>.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -18656,7 +18656,7 @@
 
             <para>
               How many blocks (links) are used. For fixed-format tables,
-              this is the same as the number of records.
+              this is the same as the number of rows.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -18696,7 +18696,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              If a record is updated to a shorter length, some space is
+              If a row is updated to a shorter length, some space is
               lost. This is the sum of all such losses, in bytes.
             </para>
           </listitem>
@@ -18707,8 +18707,8 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              When the dynamic table format is used, record fragments
-              are linked with pointers (4 to 7 bytes each).
+              When the dynamic table format is used, row fragments are
+              linked with pointers (4 to 7 bytes each).
               <literal>Linkdata</literal> is the sum of the amount of
               storage used by all such pointers.
             </para>

Modified: trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml	2006-01-23 21:25:22 UTC (rev 999)
+++ trunk/refman-5.0/database-administration.xml	2006-01-23 21:25:36 UTC (rev 1000)
@@ -7331,14 +7331,14 @@
 | Bytes_received                    | 155372598  |
 | Bytes_sent                        | 1176560426 |
 
-&hellip;
+...
 
 | Connections                       | 30023      |
 | Created_tmp_disk_tables           | 0          |
 | Created_tmp_files                 | 3          |
 | Created_tmp_tables                | 2          |
 
-&hellip;
+...
 
 | Threads_created                   | 217        |
 | Threads_running                   | 88         |
@@ -10055,7 +10055,7 @@
 
         <refsynopsisdiv>
           <cmdsynopsis>
-            <command>mysqld_multi [<replaceable>options</replaceable>] {start|stop|report} [<replaceable>GNR</replaceable>[,<replaceable>GNR</replaceable>] &hellip;]</command>
+            <command>mysqld_multi [<replaceable>options</replaceable>] {start|stop|report} [<replaceable>GNR</replaceable>[,<replaceable>GNR</replaceable>] ...]</command>
           </cmdsynopsis>
         </refsynopsisdiv>
 
@@ -11777,7 +11777,7 @@
             <literal>234 OR 1=1</literal> to cause the application to
             generate the query <literal>SELECT * FROM table WHERE ID=234
             OR 1=1</literal>. As a result, the server retrieves every
-            record in the table. This exposes every record and causes
+            row in the table. This exposes every row and causes
             excessive server load. The simplest way to protect from this
             type of attack is to use single quotes around the numeric
             constants: <literal>SELECT * FROM table WHERE
@@ -11791,12 +11791,12 @@
           <para>
             Sometimes people think that if a database contains only
             publicly available data, it need not be protected. This is
-            incorrect. Even if it is allowable to display any record in
-            the database, you should still protect against denial of
-            service attacks (for example, those that are based on the
-            technique in the preceding paragraph that causes the server
-            to waste resources). Otherwise, your server becomes
-            unresponsive to legitimate users.
+            incorrect. Even if it is allowable to display any row in the
+            database, you should still protect against denial of service
+            attacks (for example, those that are based on the technique
+            in the preceding paragraph that causes the server to waste
+            resources). Otherwise, your server becomes unresponsive to
+            legitimate users.
           </para>
 
           <para>
@@ -14123,9 +14123,9 @@
         (<literal>Host</literal>, <literal>User</literal>, and
         <literal>Password</literal>). The server accepts the connection
         only if the <literal>Host</literal> and <literal>User</literal>
-        columns in some <literal>user</literal> table record match the
+        columns in some <literal>user</literal> table row match the
         client hostname and username, and the client supplies the
-        password specified in that record.
+        password specified in that row.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -14232,7 +14232,7 @@
         <listitem>
           <para>
             A blank <literal>Host</literal> value in a
-            <literal>db</literal> table record means that its privileges
+            <literal>db</literal> table row means that its privileges
             should be combined with those in the row in the
             <literal>host</literal> table that matches the client
             hostname. The privileges are combined using an AND
@@ -14431,12 +14431,12 @@
 
 <programlisting>
 +-----------+----------+-
-| Host      | User     | &hellip;
+| Host      | User     | ...
 +-----------+----------+-
-| %         | root     | &hellip;
-| %         | jeffrey  | &hellip;
-| localhost | root     | &hellip;
-| localhost |          | &hellip;
+| %         | root     | ...
+| %         | jeffrey  | ...
+| localhost | root     | ...
+| localhost |          | ...
 +-----------+----------+-
 </programlisting>
 
@@ -14455,12 +14455,12 @@
 
 <programlisting>
 +-----------+----------+-
-| Host      | User     | &hellip;
+| Host      | User     | ...
 +-----------+----------+-
-| localhost | root     | &hellip; ...
-| localhost |          | &hellip; ...
-| %         | jeffrey  | &hellip; ...
-| %         | root     | &hellip; ...
+| localhost | root     | ...
+| localhost |          | ...
+| %         | jeffrey  | ...
+| %         | root     | ...
 +-----------+----------+-
 </programlisting>
 
@@ -14499,10 +14499,10 @@
 
 <programlisting>
 +----------------+----------+-
-| Host           | User     | &hellip;
+| Host           | User     | ...
 +----------------+----------+-
-| %              | jeffrey  | &hellip;
-| thomas.loc.gov |          | &hellip;
+| %              | jeffrey  | ...
+| thomas.loc.gov |          | ...
 +----------------+----------+-
 </programlisting>
 
@@ -14512,10 +14512,10 @@
 
 <programlisting>
 +----------------+----------+-
-| Host           | User     | &hellip;
+| Host           | User     | ...
 +----------------+----------+-
-| thomas.loc.gov |          | &hellip;
-| %              | jeffrey  | &hellip;
+| thomas.loc.gov |          | ...
+| %              | jeffrey  | ...
 +----------------+----------+-
 </programlisting>
 
@@ -14549,7 +14549,7 @@
         <literal><replaceable>user_name</replaceable>@<replaceable>host_name</replaceable></literal>
         format that indicates the <literal>User</literal> and
         <literal>Host</literal> values from the matching
-        <literal>user</literal> table record. Suppose that
+        <literal>user</literal> table row. Suppose that
         <literal>jeffrey</literal> connects and issues the following
         query:
       </para>
@@ -16842,9 +16842,9 @@
         <literal>dummy</literal> account, only the
         <literal>Host</literal>, <literal>User</literal>, and
         <literal>Password</literal> columns in the
-        <literal>user</literal> table record are assigned values. None
-        of the privilege columns are set explicitly, so MySQL assigns
-        them all the default value of <literal>'N'</literal>. This is
+        <literal>user</literal> table row are assigned values. None of
+        the privilege columns are set explicitly, so MySQL assigns them
+        all the default value of <literal>'N'</literal>. This is
         equivalent to what <literal>GRANT USAGE</literal> does.
       </para>
 
@@ -17116,7 +17116,7 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        An account in this context is a single record in the
+        An account in this context is a single row in the
         <literal>user</literal> table. Each account is uniquely
         identified by its <literal>User</literal> and
         <literal>Host</literal> column values.
@@ -17300,7 +17300,7 @@
 
       <para>
         The account for which this command resets the password is the
-        one with a <literal>user</literal> table record that matches
+        one with a <literal>user</literal> table row that matches
         <replaceable>user_name</replaceable> in the
         <literal>User</literal> column and the client host
         <emphasis>from which you connect</emphasis> in the
@@ -18766,11 +18766,11 @@
           <para>
             To reload the table, use and restore with <literal>LOAD DATA
             INFILE 'file_name' REPLACE ...</literal> To avoid duplicate
-            records, the table must have a <literal>PRIMARY
-            KEY</literal> or a <literal>UNIQUE</literal> index. The
-            <literal>REPLACE</literal> keyword causes old records to be
-            replaced with new ones when a new record duplicates an old
-            record on a unique key value.
+            rows, the table must have a <literal>PRIMARY KEY</literal>
+            or a <literal>UNIQUE</literal> index. The
+            <literal>REPLACE</literal> keyword causes old rows to be
+            replaced with new ones when a new row duplicates an old row
+            on a unique key value.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -19937,8 +19937,8 @@
               Use <command>myisamchk -r
               <replaceable>tbl_name</replaceable></command>
               (<option>-r</option> means <quote>recovery mode</quote>).
-              This removes incorrect records and deleted records from
-              the data file and reconstructs the index file.
+              This removes incorrect rows and deleted rows from the data
+              file and reconstructs the index file.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20078,8 +20078,8 @@
         </indexterm>
 
         <para>
-          To coalesce fragmented records and eliminate wasted space
-          resulting from deleting or updating records, run
+          To coalesce fragmented rows and eliminate wasted space
+          resulting from deleting or updating rows, run
           <command>myisamchk</command> in recovery mode:
         </para>
 
@@ -20539,7 +20539,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              How many records are in the table.
+              How many rows are in the table.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20561,9 +20561,9 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              For dynamic record format, this indicates how many data
+              For dynamic-row format, this indicates how many data
               blocks there are. For an optimized table without
-              fragmented records, this is the same as <literal>Data
+              fragmented rows, this is the same as <literal>Data
               records</literal>.
             </para>
           </listitem>
@@ -20589,8 +20589,8 @@
               The size of the data file pointer, in bytes. It is usually
               2, 3, 4, or 5 bytes. Most tables manage with 2 bytes, but
               this cannot be controlled from MySQL yet. For fixed
-              tables, this is a record address. For dynamic tables, this
-              is a byte address.
+              tables, this is a row address. For dynamic tables, this is
+              a byte address.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20633,7 +20633,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              How much space each record takes, in bytes.
+              How much space each row takes, in bytes.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20679,7 +20679,7 @@
                 </para>
 
                 <para>
-                  Where in the record this index part starts.
+                  Where in the row this index part starts.
                 </para>
               </listitem>
 
@@ -20752,8 +20752,8 @@
 
                 <para>
                   This is a statistical value used by the optimizer. It
-                  tells how many records there are per value for this
-                  key. A unique key always has a value of 1. This may be
+                  tells how many rows there are per value for this key.
+                  A unique key always has a value of 1. This may be
                   updated after a table is loaded (or greatly changed)
                   with <command>myisamchk -a</command>. If this is not
                   updated at all, a default value of 30 is given.
@@ -20827,9 +20827,9 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              The average record length. This is the exact record length
-              for tables with fixed-length records, because all records
-              have the same length.
+              The average row length. This is the exact row length for
+              tables with fixed-length rows, because all rows have the
+              same length.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20875,11 +20875,11 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              Average number of blocks per record (that is, how many
-              links a fragmented record is composed of). This is always
-              1.0 for fixed-format tables. This value should stay as
-              close to 1.0 as possible. If it gets too big, you can
-              reorganize the table. See <xref linkend="optimization"/>.
+              Average number of blocks per row (that is, how many links
+              a fragmented row is composed of). This is always 1.0 for
+              fixed-format tables. This value should stay as close to
+              1.0 as possible. If it gets too big, you can reorganize
+              the table. See <xref linkend="optimization"/>.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20890,7 +20890,7 @@
 
             <para>
               How many blocks (links) are used. For fixed format, this
-              is the same as the number of records.
+              is the same as the number of rows.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20930,7 +20930,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              If a record is updated to a shorter length, some space is
+              If a row is updated to a shorter length, some space is
               lost. This is the sum of all such losses, in bytes.
             </para>
           </listitem>
@@ -20941,8 +20941,8 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              When the dynamic table format is used, record fragments
-              are linked with pointers (4 to 7 bytes each).
+              When the dynamic table format is used, row fragments are
+              linked with pointers (4 to 7 bytes each).
               <literal>Linkdata</literal> is the sum of the amount of
               storage used by all such pointers.
             </para>

Modified: trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-23 21:25:22 UTC (rev 999)
+++ trunk/refman-5.1/database-administration.xml	2006-01-23 21:25:36 UTC (rev 1000)
@@ -7398,14 +7398,14 @@
 | Bytes_received                    | 155372598  |
 | Bytes_sent                        | 1176560426 |
 
-&hellip;
+...
 
 | Connections                       | 30023      |
 | Created_tmp_disk_tables           | 0          |
 | Created_tmp_files                 | 3          |
 | Created_tmp_tables                | 2          |
 
-&hellip;
+...
 
 | Threads_created                   | 217        |
 | Threads_running                   | 88         |
@@ -10108,7 +10108,7 @@
 
         <refsynopsisdiv>
           <cmdsynopsis>
-            <command>mysqld_multi [<replaceable>options</replaceable>] {start|stop|report} [<replaceable>GNR</replaceable>[,<replaceable>GNR</replaceable>] &hellip;]</command>
+            <command>mysqld_multi [<replaceable>options</replaceable>] {start|stop|report} [<replaceable>GNR</replaceable>[,<replaceable>GNR</replaceable>] ...]</command>
           </cmdsynopsis>
         </refsynopsisdiv>
 
@@ -11814,7 +11814,7 @@
             <literal>234 OR 1=1</literal> to cause the application to
             generate the query <literal>SELECT * FROM table WHERE ID=234
             OR 1=1</literal>. As a result, the server retrieves every
-            record in the table. This exposes every record and causes
+            row in the table. This exposes every row and causes
             excessive server load. The simplest way to protect from this
             type of attack is to use single quotes around the numeric
             constants: <literal>SELECT * FROM table WHERE
@@ -11828,12 +11828,12 @@
           <para>
             Sometimes people think that if a database contains only
             publicly available data, it need not be protected. This is
-            incorrect. Even if it is allowable to display any record in
-            the database, you should still protect against denial of
-            service attacks (for example, those that are based on the
-            technique in the preceding paragraph that causes the server
-            to waste resources). Otherwise, your server becomes
-            unresponsive to legitimate users.
+            incorrect. Even if it is allowable to display any row in the
+            database, you should still protect against denial of service
+            attacks (for example, those that are based on the technique
+            in the preceding paragraph that causes the server to waste
+            resources). Otherwise, your server becomes unresponsive to
+            legitimate users.
           </para>
 
           <para>
@@ -14138,9 +14138,9 @@
         (<literal>Host</literal>, <literal>User</literal>, and
         <literal>Password</literal>). The server accepts the connection
         only if the <literal>Host</literal> and <literal>User</literal>
-        columns in some <literal>user</literal> table record match the
+        columns in some <literal>user</literal> table row match the
         client hostname and username, and the client supplies the
-        password specified in that record.
+        password specified in that row.
       </para>
 
       <para>
@@ -14247,7 +14247,7 @@
         <listitem>
           <para>
             A blank <literal>Host</literal> value in a
-            <literal>db</literal> table record means that its privileges
+            <literal>db</literal> table row means that its privileges
             should be combined with those in the row in the
             <literal>host</literal> table that matches the client
             hostname. The privileges are combined using an AND
@@ -14446,12 +14446,12 @@
 
 <programlisting>
 +-----------+----------+-
-| Host      | User     | &hellip;
+| Host      | User     | ...
 +-----------+----------+-
-| %         | root     | &hellip;
-| %         | jeffrey  | &hellip;
-| localhost | root     | &hellip;
-| localhost |          | &hellip;
+| %         | root     | ...
+| %         | jeffrey  | ...
+| localhost | root     | ...
+| localhost |          | ...
 +-----------+----------+-
 </programlisting>
 
@@ -14470,12 +14470,12 @@
 
 <programlisting>
 +-----------+----------+-
-| Host      | User     | &hellip;
+| Host      | User     | ...
 +-----------+----------+-
-| localhost | root     | &hellip; ...
-| localhost |          | &hellip; ...
-| %         | jeffrey  | &hellip; ...
-| %         | root     | &hellip; ...
+| localhost | root     | ...
+| localhost |          | ...
+| %         | jeffrey  | ...
+| %         | root     | ...
 +-----------+----------+-
 </programlisting>
 
@@ -14514,10 +14514,10 @@
 
 <programlisting>
 +----------------+----------+-
-| Host           | User     | &hellip;
+| Host           | User     | ...
 +----------------+----------+-
-| %              | jeffrey  | &hellip;
-| thomas.loc.gov |          | &hellip;
+| %              | jeffrey  | ...
+| thomas.loc.gov |          | ...
 +----------------+----------+-
 </programlisting>
 
@@ -14527,10 +14527,10 @@
 
 <programlisting>
 +----------------+----------+-
-| Host           | User     | &hellip;
+| Host           | User     | ...
 +----------------+----------+-
-| thomas.loc.gov |          | &hellip;
-| %              | jeffrey  | &hellip;
+| thomas.loc.gov |          | ...
+| %              | jeffrey  | ...
 +----------------+----------+-
 </programlisting>
 
@@ -14564,7 +14564,7 @@
         <literal><replaceable>user_name</replaceable>@<replaceable>host_name</replaceable></literal>
         format that indicates the <literal>User</literal> and
         <literal>Host</literal> values from the matching
-        <literal>user</literal> table record. Suppose that
+        <literal>user</literal> table row. Suppose that
         <literal>jeffrey</literal> connects and issues the following
         query:
       </para>
@@ -16857,9 +16857,9 @@
         <literal>dummy</literal> account, only the
         <literal>Host</literal>, <literal>User</literal>, and
         <literal>Password</literal> columns in the
-        <literal>user</literal> table record are assigned values. None
-        of the privilege columns are set explicitly, so MySQL assigns
-        them all the default value of <literal>'N'</literal>. This is
+        <literal>user</literal> table row are assigned values. None of
+        the privilege columns are set explicitly, so MySQL assigns them
+        all the default value of <literal>'N'</literal>. This is
         equivalent to what <literal>GRANT USAGE</literal> does.
       </para>
 
@@ -17131,7 +17131,7 @@
       </para>
 
       <para>
-        An account in this context is a single record in the
+        An account in this context is a single row in the
         <literal>user</literal> table. Each account is uniquely
         identified by its <literal>User</literal> and
         <literal>Host</literal> column values.
@@ -17310,7 +17310,7 @@
 
       <para>
         The account for which this command resets the password is the
-        one with a <literal>user</literal> table record that matches
+        one with a <literal>user</literal> table row that matches
         <replaceable>user_name</replaceable> in the
         <literal>User</literal> column and the client host
         <emphasis>from which you connect</emphasis> in the
@@ -18776,11 +18776,11 @@
           <para>
             To reload the table, use and restore with <literal>LOAD DATA
             INFILE 'file_name' REPLACE ...</literal> To avoid duplicate
-            records, the table must have a <literal>PRIMARY
-            KEY</literal> or a <literal>UNIQUE</literal> index. The
-            <literal>REPLACE</literal> keyword causes old records to be
-            replaced with new ones when a new record duplicates an old
-            record on a unique key value.
+            rows, the table must have a <literal>PRIMARY KEY</literal>
+            or a <literal>UNIQUE</literal> index. The
+            <literal>REPLACE</literal> keyword causes old rows to be
+            replaced with new ones when a new row duplicates an old row
+            on a unique key value.
           </para>
         </listitem>
 
@@ -19947,8 +19947,8 @@
               Use <command>myisamchk -r
               <replaceable>tbl_name</replaceable></command>
               (<option>-r</option> means <quote>recovery mode</quote>).
-              This removes incorrect records and deleted records from
-              the data file and reconstructs the index file.
+              This removes incorrect rows and deleted rows from the data
+              file and reconstructs the index file.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20088,8 +20088,8 @@
         </indexterm>
 
         <para>
-          To coalesce fragmented records and eliminate wasted space
-          resulting from deleting or updating records, run
+          To coalesce fragmented rows and eliminate wasted space
+          resulting from deleting or updating rows, run
           <command>myisamchk</command> in recovery mode:
         </para>
 
@@ -20549,7 +20549,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              How many records are in the table.
+              How many rows are in the table.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20571,9 +20571,9 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              For dynamic record format, this indicates how many data
+              For dynamic-row format, this indicates how many data
               blocks there are. For an optimized table without
-              fragmented records, this is the same as <literal>Data
+              fragmented rows, this is the same as <literal>Data
               records</literal>.
             </para>
           </listitem>
@@ -20599,8 +20599,8 @@
               The size of the data file pointer, in bytes. It is usually
               2, 3, 4, or 5 bytes. Most tables manage with 2 bytes, but
               this cannot be controlled from MySQL yet. For fixed
-              tables, this is a record address. For dynamic tables, this
-              is a byte address.
+              tables, this is a row address. For dynamic tables, this is
+              a byte address.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20643,7 +20643,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              How much space each record takes, in bytes.
+              How much space each row takes, in bytes.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20689,7 +20689,7 @@
                 </para>
 
                 <para>
-                  Where in the record this index part starts.
+                  Where in the row this index part starts.
                 </para>
               </listitem>
 
@@ -20762,8 +20762,8 @@
 
                 <para>
                   This is a statistical value used by the optimizer. It
-                  tells how many records there are per value for this
-                  key. A unique key always has a value of 1. This may be
+                  tells how many rows there are per value for this key.
+                  A unique key always has a value of 1. This may be
                   updated after a table is loaded (or greatly changed)
                   with <command>myisamchk -a</command>. If this is not
                   updated at all, a default value of 30 is given.
@@ -20837,9 +20837,9 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              The average record length. This is the exact record length
-              for tables with fixed-length records, because all records
-              have the same length.
+              The average row length. This is the exact row length for
+              tables with fixed-length rows, because all rows have the
+              same length.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20885,11 +20885,11 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              Average number of blocks per record (that is, how many
-              links a fragmented record is composed of). This is always
-              1.0 for fixed-format tables. This value should stay as
-              close to 1.0 as possible. If it gets too big, you can
-              reorganize the table. See <xref linkend="optimization"/>.
+              Average number of blocks per row (that is, how many links
+              a fragmented row is composed of). This is always 1.0 for
+              fixed-format tables. This value should stay as close to
+              1.0 as possible. If it gets too big, you can reorganize
+              the table. See <xref linkend="optimization"/>.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20900,7 +20900,7 @@
 
             <para>
               How many blocks (links) are used. For fixed format, this
-              is the same as the number of records.
+              is the same as the number of rows.
             </para>
           </listitem>
 
@@ -20940,7 +20940,7 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              If a record is updated to a shorter length, some space is
+              If a row is updated to a shorter length, some space is
               lost. This is the sum of all such losses, in bytes.
             </para>
           </listitem>
@@ -20951,8 +20951,8 @@
             </para>
 
             <para>
-              When the dynamic table format is used, record fragments
-              are linked with pointers (4 to 7 bytes each).
+              When the dynamic table format is used, row fragments are
+              linked with pointers (4 to 7 bytes each).
               <literal>Linkdata</literal> is the sum of the amount of
               storage used by all such pointers.
             </para>

Thread
svn commit - mysqldoc@docsrva: r1000 - in trunk: . refman-4.1 refman-5.0 refman-5.1paul23 Jan