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From:jon.stephens Date:May 10 2011 7:55am
Subject:svn commit - mysqldoc@oter02: r26163 - in trunk: refman-5.0 refman-5.1
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Author: js221926
Date: 2011-05-10 09:55:50 +0200 (Tue, 10 May 2011)
New Revision: 26163

Log:

WL#5300 (Overhaul of Cluster installation section)

Change section ID, add to renamed nodes

Rework section intro



Modified:
   trunk/refman-5.0/mysql-cluster-multi-computer.xml
   trunk/refman-5.0/renamed-nodes.txt
   trunk/refman-5.1/mysql-cluster-multi-computer.xml
   trunk/refman-5.1/renamed-nodes.txt


Modified: trunk/refman-5.0/mysql-cluster-multi-computer.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.0/mysql-cluster-multi-computer.xml	2011-05-09 19:34:28 UTC (rev 26162)
+++ trunk/refman-5.0/mysql-cluster-multi-computer.xml	2011-05-10 07:55:50 UTC (rev 26163)
Changed blocks: 6, Lines Added: 192, Lines Deleted: 167; 16545 bytes

@@ -2,10 +2,10 @@
 <!DOCTYPE section PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook XML V4.3//EN" "http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/xml/4.3/docbookx.dtd" [
 <!ENTITY % all.entities SYSTEM "all-entities.ent">
   %all.entities;
-]>
-<section id="mysql-cluster-multi-computer">
+  ]>
+<section id="mysql-cluster-installation">
 
-  <title>MySQL Cluster Multi-Computer How-To</title>
+  <title>MySQL Cluster Installation</title>
 
   <indexterm>
     <primary>MySQL Cluster How-To</primary>

@@ -29,17 +29,9 @@
     <secondary>configuration</secondary>
   </indexterm>
 
-  <remark>
-    Multi-Computer How-To, Version 1.0, 2005-02-08. Authors: Jon
-    Stephens with Tomas Ulin. Technical Reviewers: Pekka Nouisainen,
-    Mikael Ronström, and JD Duncan. Additional Review and commentary
-    from Jeb Miller.
-  </remark>
-
   <para>
-    This section is a <quote>How-To</quote> that describes the basics
-    for how to plan, install, configure, and run a MySQL Cluster.
-    Whereas the examples in
+    This section describes the basics for planning, installing,
+    configuring, and running a MySQL Cluster. Whereas the examples in
     <xref linkend="mysql-cluster-configuration"/> provide more in-depth
     information on a variety of clustering options and configuration,
     the result of following the guidelines and procedures outlined here

@@ -57,68 +49,77 @@
 
   <formalpara>
 
-    <title>Basic assumptions</title>
+    <title>Assumptions</title>
 
     <para>
-      This <citetitle>How-To</citetitle> makes the following
-      assumptions:
+      The following sections make a number of assumptions regarding the
+      cluster&apos;s physical and network configuration. These
+      assumptions are discussed in the next few paragraphs.
     </para>
 
   </formalpara>
 
-  <orderedlist>
+  <formalpara>
 
-    <listitem>
-      <para>
-        The cluster is to be set up with four nodes, each on a separate
-        host, and each with a fixed network address on a typical
-        Ethernet network as shown here:
-      </para>
+    <title>Cluster nodes and host computers</title>
 
-      <informaltable>
-        <tgroup cols="2">
-          <colspec colwidth="50*"/>
-          <colspec colwidth="30*"/>
-          <thead>
-            <row>
-              <entry>Node</entry>
-              <entry>IP Address</entry>
-            </row>
-          </thead>
-          <tbody>
-            <row>
-              <entry>Management (MGMD) node</entry>
-              <entry>192.168.0.10</entry>
-            </row>
-            <row>
-              <entry>MySQL server (SQL) node</entry>
-              <entry>192.168.0.20</entry>
-            </row>
-            <row>
-              <entry>Data (NDBD) node "A"</entry>
-              <entry>192.168.0.30</entry>
-            </row>
-            <row>
-              <entry>Data (NDBD) node "B"</entry>
-              <entry>192.168.0.40</entry>
-            </row>
-          </tbody>
-        </tgroup>
-      </informaltable>
+    <para>
+      The cluster consists of four nodes, each on a separate host
+      computer, and each with a fixed network address on a typical
+      Ethernet network as shown here:
+    </para>
 
-      <para>
-        This may be made clearer in the following diagram:
-      </para>
+  </formalpara>
 
-      <mediaobject>
-        <imageobject>
-          <imagedata contentwidth="500" contentdepth="393" fileref="../refman-common/images/published/multi-comp-1.png" format="PNG"/>
-        </imageobject>
-        <textobject>
-          <phrase lang="en">MySQL Cluster Multi-Computer Setup</phrase>
-        </textobject>
-      </mediaobject>
+  <informaltable>
+    <tgroup cols="2">
+      <colspec colwidth="50*"/>
+      <colspec colwidth="30*"/>
+      <thead>
+        <row>
+          <entry>Node</entry>
+          <entry>IP Address</entry>
+        </row>
+      </thead>
+      <tbody>
+        <row>
+          <entry>Management node (<command>mgmd</command>)</entry>
+          <entry>192.168.0.10</entry>
+        </row>
+        <row>
+          <entry>SQL node (<command>mysqld</command>)</entry>
+          <entry>192.168.0.20</entry>
+        </row>
+        <row>
+          <entry>Data node "A" (<command>ndbd</command>)</entry>
+          <entry>192.168.0.30</entry>
+        </row>
+        <row>
+          <entry>Data node "B" (<command>ndbd</command>)</entry>
+          <entry>192.168.0.40</entry>
+        </row>
+      </tbody>
+    </tgroup>
+  </informaltable>
 
+  <para>
+    This may be made clearer by the following diagram:
+  </para>
+
+  <mediaobject>
+    <imageobject>
+      <imagedata contentwidth="500" contentdepth="393" fileref="../refman-common/images/published/multi-comp-1.png" format="PNG"/>
+    </imageobject>
+    <textobject>
+      <phrase lang="en">MySQL Cluster Multi-Computer Setup</phrase>
+    </textobject>
+  </mediaobject>
+
+  <formalpara>
+
+    <title>Network addressing</title>
+
+    <para>
       <indexterm>
         <primary>MySQL Cluster</primary>
         <secondary>and IP addressing</secondary>

@@ -129,31 +130,39 @@
         <secondary>and DNS</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>
-        In the interest of simplicity (and reliability), this
-        <citetitle>How-To</citetitle> uses only numeric IP addresses.
-        However, if DNS resolution is available on your network, it is
-        possible to use host names in lieu of IP addresses in
-        configuring Cluster. Alternatively, you can use the
-        <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> file or your operating
-        system&apos;s equivalent for providing a means to do host lookup
-        if such is available.
-      </para>
+      In the interest of simplicity (and reliability), this
+      <citetitle>How-To</citetitle> uses only numeric IP addresses.
+      However, if DNS resolution is available on your network, it is
+      possible to use host names in lieu of IP addresses in configuring
+      Cluster. Alternatively, you can use the <filename>hosts</filename>
+      file (typically <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> for Linux and
+      other Unix-like operating systems,
+      <filename>C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc\hosts</filename> on
+      Windows, or your operating system&apos;s equivalent) for providing
+      a means to do host lookup if such is available.
+    </para>
 
-      <note>
-        <para>
-          A common problem when trying to use host names for Cluster
-          nodes arises because of the way in which some operating
-          systems (including some Linux distributions) set up the
-          system's own host name in the <filename>/etc/hosts</filename>
-          during installation. Consider two machines with the host names
-          <literal>ndb1</literal> and <literal>ndb2</literal>, both in
-          the <literal>cluster</literal> network domain. Red Hat Linux
-          (including some derivatives such as CentOS and Fedora) places
-          the following entries in these machines'
-          <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> files:
-        </para>
+  </formalpara>
 
+  <formalpara>
+
+    <title>Potential hosts file issues</title>
+
+    <para>
+      A common problem when trying to use host names for Cluster nodes
+      arises because of the way in which some operating systems
+      (including some Linux distributions) set up the system&apos;s own
+      host name in the <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> during
+      installation. Consider two machines with the host names
+      <literal>ndb1</literal> and <literal>ndb2</literal>, both in the
+      <literal>cluster</literal> network domain. Red Hat Linux
+      (including some derivatives such as CentOS and Fedora) places the
+      following entries in these machines'
+      <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> files:
+    </para>
+
+  </formalpara>
+
 <programlisting>
 #  ndb1 <filename>/etc/hosts</filename>:
 127.0.0.1   ndb1.cluster ndb1 localhost.localdomain localhost

@@ -164,10 +173,10 @@
 127.0.0.1   ndb2.cluster ndb2 localhost.localdomain localhost
 </programlisting>
 
-        <para>
-          SUSE Linux (including OpenSUSE) places these entries in the
-          machines&apos; <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> files:
-        </para>
+  <para>
+    SUSE Linux (including OpenSUSE) places these entries in the
+    machines&apos; <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> files:
+  </para>
 
 <programlisting>
 #  ndb1 <filename>/etc/hosts</filename>:

@@ -181,93 +190,109 @@
 127.0.0.2       ndb2.cluster ndb2
 </programlisting>
 
-        <para>
-          In both instances, <literal>ndb1</literal> routes
-          <literal>ndb1.cluster</literal> to a loopback IP address, but
-          gets a public IP address from DNS for
-          <literal>ndb2.cluster</literal>, while <literal>ndb2</literal>
-          routes <literal>ndb2.cluster</literal> to a loopback address
-          and obtains a public address for
-          <literal>ndb1.cluster</literal>. The result is that each data
-          node connects to the management server, but cannot tell when
-          any other data nodes have connected, and so the data nodes
-          appear to hang while starting.
-        </para>
+  <para>
+    In both instances, <literal>ndb1</literal> routes
+    <literal>ndb1.cluster</literal> to a loopback IP address, but gets a
+    public IP address from DNS for <literal>ndb2.cluster</literal>,
+    while <literal>ndb2</literal> routes <literal>ndb2.cluster</literal>
+    to a loopback address and obtains a public address for
+    <literal>ndb1.cluster</literal>. The result is that each data node
+    connects to the management server, but cannot tell when any other
+    data nodes have connected, and so the data nodes appear to hang
+    while starting.
+  </para>
 
-        <para>
-          You should also be aware that you cannot mix
-          <literal>localhost</literal> and other host names or IP
-          addresses in <filename>config.ini</filename>. For these
-          reasons, the solution in such cases (other than to use IP
-          addresses for <emphasis>all</emphasis>
-          <filename>config.ini</filename> <literal>HostName</literal>
-          entries) is to remove the fully qualified host names from
-          <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> and use these in
-          <filename>config.ini</filename> for all cluster hosts.
-        </para>
-      </note>
-    </listitem>
+  <caution>
+    <para>
+      You cannot mix <literal>localhost</literal> and other host names
+      or IP addresses in <filename>config.ini</filename>. For these
+      reasons, the solution in such cases (other than to use IP
+      addresses for <emphasis>all</emphasis>
+      <filename>config.ini</filename> <literal>HostName</literal>
+      entries) is to remove the fully qualified host names from
+      <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> and use these in
+      <filename>config.ini</filename> for all cluster hosts.
+    </para>
+  </caution>
 
-    <listitem>
-      <para>
-        Each host in our scenario is an Intel-based desktop PC running a
-        supported operating system installed to disk in a standard
-        configuration, and running no unnecessary services. The core
-        operating system with standard TCP/IP networking capabilities
-        should be sufficient. Also for the sake of simplicity, we also
-        assume that the file systems on all hosts are set up
-        identically. In the event that they are not, you should adapt
-        these instructions accordingly.
-      </para>
-    </listitem>
+  <formalpara>
 
-    <listitem>
-      <para>
-        Standard 100 Mbps or 1 gigabit Ethernet cards are installed on
-        each machine, along with the proper drivers for the cards, and
-        that all four hosts are connected through a standard-issue
-        Ethernet networking appliance such as a switch. (All machines
-        should use network cards with the same throughout. That is, all
-        four machines in the cluster should have 100 Mbps cards
-        <emphasis>or</emphasis> all four machines should have 1 Gbps
-        cards.) MySQL Cluster works in a 100 Mbps network; however,
-        gigabit Ethernet provides better performance.
-      </para>
+    <title>Host computer type</title>
 
-      <para>
-        Note that MySQL Cluster is <emphasis>not</emphasis> intended for
-        use in a network for which throughput is less than 100 Mbps or
-        which experiences a high degree of latency. For this reason
-        (among others), attempting to run a MySQL Cluster over a wide
-        area network such as the Internet is not likely to be
-        successful, and is not supported in production.
-      </para>
-    </listitem>
+    <para>
+      Each host computer in our installation scenario is an Intel-based
+      desktop PC running a supported operating system installed to disk
+      in a standard configuration, and running no unnecessary services.
+      The core operating system with standard TCP/IP networking
+      capabilities should be sufficient. Also for the sake of
+      simplicity, we also assume that the file systems on all hosts are
+      set up identically. In the event that they are not, you should
+      adapt these instructions accordingly.
+    </para>
 
-    <listitem>
-      <para>
-        For our sample data, we use the <literal>world</literal>
-        database which is available for download from the MySQL Web site
-        (see <ulink url="http://dev.mysql.com/doc/index-other.html"/>).
-        We assume that each machine has sufficient memory for running
-        the operating system, host NDB process, and (on the data nodes)
-        storing the database.
-      </para>
-    </listitem>
+  </formalpara>
 
-  </orderedlist>
+  <formalpara>
 
+    <title>Network hardware</title>
+
+    <para>
+      Standard 100 Mbps or 1 gigabit Ethernet cards are installed on
+      each machine, along with the proper drivers for the cards, and
+      that all four hosts are connected through a standard-issue
+      Ethernet networking appliance such as a switch. (All machines
+      should use network cards with the same throughout. That is, all
+      four machines in the cluster should have 100 Mbps cards
+      <emphasis>or</emphasis> all four machines should have 1 Gbps
+      cards.) MySQL Cluster works in a 100 Mbps network; however,
+      gigabit Ethernet provides better performance.
+    </para>
+
+  </formalpara>
+
+  <important>
+    <para>
+      MySQL Cluster is <emphasis>not</emphasis> intended for use in a
+      network for which throughput is less than 100 Mbps or which
+      experiences a high degree of latency. For this reason (among
+      others), attempting to run a MySQL Cluster over a wide area
+      network such as the Internet is not likely to be successful, and
+      is not supported in production.
+    </para>
+  </important>
+
+  <formalpara>
+
+    <title>Sample data</title>
+
+    <para>
+      We use the <literal>world</literal> database which is available
+      for download from the MySQL Web site (see
+      <ulink url="http://dev.mysql.com/doc/index-other.html"/>). We
+      assume that each machine has sufficient memory for running the
+      operating system, required MySQL Cluster processes, and (on the
+      data nodes) storing the database.
+    </para>
+
+  </formalpara>
+
   <para>
-    Although we refer to a Linux operating system in this How-To, the
-    instructions and procedures that we provide here should be easily
-    adaptable to other supported operating systems. We also assume that
-    you already know how to perform a minimal installation and
-    configuration of the operating system with networking capability, or
-    that you are able to obtain assistance in this elsewhere if needed.
+    We also assume that you already know how to perform a minimal
+    installation and configuration of the operating system with
+    networking capability, or that you are able to obtain assistance in
+    this elsewhere if needed.
   </para>
 
   <para>
-    For information about MySQL Cluster hardware, software, and
+    For information relating to installation of MySQL Cluster on Linux
+    and other Unix-like operating systems, see
+    <xref linkend="mysql-cluster-install-linux"/>. For information
+    relating to installation of MySQL Cluster on Windows operating
+    systems, see <xref linkend="mysql-cluster-install-windows"/>.
+  </para>
+
+  <para>
+    For general information about MySQL Cluster hardware, software, and
     networking requirements, see
     <xref linkend="mysql-cluster-overview-requirements"/>.
   </para>


Modified: trunk/refman-5.0/renamed-nodes.txt
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.0/renamed-nodes.txt	2011-05-09 19:34:28 UTC (rev 26162)
+++ trunk/refman-5.0/renamed-nodes.txt	2011-05-10 07:55:50 UTC (rev 26163)
Changed blocks: 1, Lines Added: 1, Lines Deleted: 0; 874 bytes

@@ -82,6 +82,7 @@
 mysql-cluster-installing mysql-cluster-multi-install 2010-09-25
 mysql-cluster-limitations-unsupported-missing mysql-cluster-limitations-unsupported 2010-08-20
 mysql-cluster-multi-hardware-software-network mysql-cluster-overview-requirements 2010-09-24
+mysql-cluster-multi-computer mysql-cluster-installation 2012-05-09
 mysql-cluster-program-options-common-table mysql-cluster-program-options-common 2010-09-28
 mysql-cluster-program-options-ndb-config mysql-cluster-programs-ndb-config 2010-09-28
 mysql-cluster-program-options-ndb-error-reporter mysql-cluster-programs-ndb-error-reporter 2010-09-28


Modified: trunk/refman-5.1/mysql-cluster-multi-computer.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.1/mysql-cluster-multi-computer.xml	2011-05-09 19:34:28 UTC (rev 26162)
+++ trunk/refman-5.1/mysql-cluster-multi-computer.xml	2011-05-10 07:55:50 UTC (rev 26163)
Changed blocks: 6, Lines Added: 188, Lines Deleted: 172; 16241 bytes

@@ -3,9 +3,9 @@
 <!ENTITY % all.entities SYSTEM "all-entities.ent">
   %all.entities;
 ]>
-<section id="mysql-cluster-multi-computer">
+<section id="mysql-cluster-installation">
 
-  <title>MySQL Cluster Multi-Computer How-To</title>
+  <title>MySQL Cluster Installation</title>
 
   <indexterm>
     <primary>MySQL Cluster How-To</primary>

@@ -29,17 +29,9 @@
     <secondary>configuration</secondary>
   </indexterm>
 
-  <remark>
-    Multi-Computer How-To, Version 1.0, 2005-02-08. Authors: Jon
-    Stephens with Tomas Ulin. Technical Reviewers: Pekka Nouisainen,
-    Mikael Ronström, and JD Duncan. Additional Review and commentary
-    from Jeb Miller.
-  </remark>
-
   <para>
-    This section is a <quote>How-To</quote> that describes the basics
-    for how to plan, install, configure, and run a MySQL Cluster.
-    Whereas the examples in
+    This section describes the basics for planning, installing,
+    configuring, and running a MySQL Cluster. Whereas the examples in
     <xref linkend="mysql-cluster-configuration"/> provide more in-depth
     information on a variety of clustering options and configuration,
     the result of following the guidelines and procedures outlined here

@@ -57,106 +49,120 @@
 
   <formalpara>
 
-    <title>Basic assumptions</title>
+    <title>Assumptions</title>
 
     <para>
-      This <citetitle>How-To</citetitle> makes the following
-      assumptions:
+      The following sections make a number of assumptions regarding the
+      cluster&apos;s physical and network configuration. These
+      assumptions are discussed in the next few paragraphs.
     </para>
 
   </formalpara>
 
-  <orderedlist>
+  <formalpara>
 
-    <listitem>
-      <para>
-        The cluster is to be set up with four nodes, each on a separate
-        host, and each with a fixed network address on a typical
-        Ethernet network as shown here:
-      </para>
+    <title>Cluster nodes and host computers</title>
 
-      <informaltable>
-        <tgroup cols="2">
-          <colspec colwidth="50*"/>
-          <colspec colwidth="30*"/>
-          <thead>
-            <row>
-              <entry>Node</entry>
-              <entry>IP Address</entry>
-            </row>
-          </thead>
-          <tbody>
-            <row>
-              <entry>Management (MGMD) node</entry>
-              <entry>192.168.0.10</entry>
-            </row>
-            <row>
-              <entry>MySQL server (SQL) node</entry>
-              <entry>192.168.0.20</entry>
-            </row>
-            <row>
-              <entry>Data (NDBD) node "A"</entry>
-              <entry>192.168.0.30</entry>
-            </row>
-            <row>
-              <entry>Data (NDBD) node "B"</entry>
-              <entry>192.168.0.40</entry>
-            </row>
-          </tbody>
-        </tgroup>
-      </informaltable>
+    <para>
+      The cluster consists of four nodes, each on a separate host
+      computer, and each with a fixed network address on a typical
+      Ethernet network as shown here:
+    </para>
 
-      <para>
-        This may be made clearer in the following diagram:
-      </para>
+  </formalpara>
 
-      <mediaobject>
-        <imageobject>
-          <imagedata contentwidth="500" contentdepth="393" fileref="../refman-common/images/published/multi-comp-1.png" format="PNG"/>
-        </imageobject>
-        <textobject>
-          <phrase lang="en">MySQL Cluster Multi-Computer Setup</phrase>
-        </textobject>
-      </mediaobject>
+  <informaltable>
+    <tgroup cols="2">
+      <colspec colwidth="50*"/>
+      <colspec colwidth="30*"/>
+      <thead>
+        <row>
+          <entry>Node</entry>
+          <entry>IP Address</entry>
+        </row>
+      </thead>
+      <tbody>
+        <row>
+          <entry>Management node (<command>mgmd</command>)</entry>
+          <entry>192.168.0.10</entry>
+        </row>
+        <row>
+          <entry>SQL node (<command>mysqld</command>)</entry>
+          <entry>192.168.0.20</entry>
+        </row>
+        <row>
+          <entry>Data node "A" (<command>ndbd</command>)</entry>
+          <entry>192.168.0.30</entry>
+        </row>
+        <row>
+          <entry>Data node "B" (<command>ndbd</command>)</entry>
+          <entry>192.168.0.40</entry>
+        </row>
+      </tbody>
+    </tgroup>
+  </informaltable>
 
-      <para>
-        <indexterm>
-          <primary>MySQL Cluster</primary>
-          <secondary>and IP addressing</secondary>
-        </indexterm>
+  <para>
+    This may be made clearer by the following diagram:
+  </para>
 
-        <indexterm>
-          <primary>MySQL Cluster</primary>
-          <secondary>and DNS</secondary>
-        </indexterm>
+  <mediaobject>
+    <imageobject>
+      <imagedata contentwidth="500" contentdepth="393" fileref="../refman-common/images/published/multi-comp-1.png" format="PNG"/>
+    </imageobject>
+    <textobject>
+      <phrase lang="en">MySQL Cluster Multi-Computer Setup</phrase>
+    </textobject>
+  </mediaobject>
 
-        In the interest of simplicity (and reliability), this
-        <citetitle>How-To</citetitle> uses only numeric IP addresses.
-        However, if DNS resolution is available on your network, it is
-        possible to use host names in lieu of IP addresses in
-        configuring Cluster. Alternatively, you can use the
-        <filename>hosts</filename> file (typically
-        <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> for Linux and other Unix-like
-        operating systems,
-        <filename>C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc\hosts</filename> on
-        Windows, or your operating system&apos;s equivalent) for
-        providing a means to do host lookup if such is available.
-      </para>
+  <formalpara>
 
-      <note>
-        <para>
-          A common problem when trying to use host names for Cluster
-          nodes arises because of the way in which some operating
-          systems (including some Linux distributions) set up the
-          system's own host name in the <filename>/etc/hosts</filename>
-          during installation. Consider two machines with the host names
-          <literal>ndb1</literal> and <literal>ndb2</literal>, both in
-          the <literal>cluster</literal> network domain. Red Hat Linux
-          (including some derivatives such as CentOS and Fedora) places
-          the following entries in these machines'
-          <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> files:
-        </para>
+    <title>Network addressing</title>
 
+    <para>
+      <indexterm>
+        <primary>MySQL Cluster</primary>
+        <secondary>and IP addressing</secondary>
+      </indexterm>
+
+      <indexterm>
+        <primary>MySQL Cluster</primary>
+        <secondary>and DNS</secondary>
+      </indexterm>
+
+      In the interest of simplicity (and reliability), this
+      <citetitle>How-To</citetitle> uses only numeric IP addresses.
+      However, if DNS resolution is available on your network, it is
+      possible to use host names in lieu of IP addresses in configuring
+      Cluster. Alternatively, you can use the <filename>hosts</filename>
+      file (typically <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> for Linux and
+      other Unix-like operating systems,
+      <filename>C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc\hosts</filename> on
+      Windows, or your operating system&apos;s equivalent) for providing
+      a means to do host lookup if such is available.
+    </para>
+
+  </formalpara>
+
+  <formalpara>
+
+    <title>Potential hosts file issues</title>
+
+    <para>
+      A common problem when trying to use host names for Cluster nodes
+      arises because of the way in which some operating systems
+      (including some Linux distributions) set up the system&apos;s own
+      host name in the <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> during
+      installation. Consider two machines with the host names
+      <literal>ndb1</literal> and <literal>ndb2</literal>, both in the
+      <literal>cluster</literal> network domain. Red Hat Linux
+      (including some derivatives such as CentOS and Fedora) places the
+      following entries in these machines'
+      <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> files:
+    </para>
+
+  </formalpara>
+
 <programlisting>
 #  ndb1 <filename>/etc/hosts</filename>:
 127.0.0.1   ndb1.cluster ndb1 localhost.localdomain localhost

@@ -167,10 +173,10 @@
 127.0.0.1   ndb2.cluster ndb2 localhost.localdomain localhost
 </programlisting>
 
-        <para>
-          SUSE Linux (including OpenSUSE) places these entries in the
-          machines&apos; <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> files:
-        </para>
+  <para>
+    SUSE Linux (including OpenSUSE) places these entries in the
+    machines&apos; <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> files:
+  </para>
 
 <programlisting>
 #  ndb1 <filename>/etc/hosts</filename>:

@@ -184,84 +190,94 @@
 127.0.0.2       ndb2.cluster ndb2
 </programlisting>
 
-        <para>
-          In both instances, <literal>ndb1</literal> routes
-          <literal>ndb1.cluster</literal> to a loopback IP address, but
-          gets a public IP address from DNS for
-          <literal>ndb2.cluster</literal>, while <literal>ndb2</literal>
-          routes <literal>ndb2.cluster</literal> to a loopback address
-          and obtains a public address for
-          <literal>ndb1.cluster</literal>. The result is that each data
-          node connects to the management server, but cannot tell when
-          any other data nodes have connected, and so the data nodes
-          appear to hang while starting.
-        </para>
+  <para>
+    In both instances, <literal>ndb1</literal> routes
+    <literal>ndb1.cluster</literal> to a loopback IP address, but gets a
+    public IP address from DNS for <literal>ndb2.cluster</literal>,
+    while <literal>ndb2</literal> routes <literal>ndb2.cluster</literal>
+    to a loopback address and obtains a public address for
+    <literal>ndb1.cluster</literal>. The result is that each data node
+    connects to the management server, but cannot tell when any other
+    data nodes have connected, and so the data nodes appear to hang
+    while starting.
+  </para>
 
-        <para>
-          You should also be aware that you cannot mix
-          <literal>localhost</literal> and other host names or IP
-          addresses in <filename>config.ini</filename>. For these
-          reasons, the solution in such cases (other than to use IP
-          addresses for <emphasis>all</emphasis>
-          <filename>config.ini</filename> <literal>HostName</literal>
-          entries) is to remove the fully qualified host names from
-          <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> and use these in
-          <filename>config.ini</filename> for all cluster hosts.
-        </para>
-      </note>
-    </listitem>
+  <caution>
+    <para>
+      You cannot mix <literal>localhost</literal> and other host names
+      or IP addresses in <filename>config.ini</filename>. For these
+      reasons, the solution in such cases (other than to use IP
+      addresses for <emphasis>all</emphasis>
+      <filename>config.ini</filename> <literal>HostName</literal>
+      entries) is to remove the fully qualified host names from
+      <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> and use these in
+      <filename>config.ini</filename> for all cluster hosts.
+    </para>
+  </caution>
 
-    <listitem>
-      <para>
-        Each host in our scenario is an Intel-based desktop PC running a
-        supported operating system installed to disk in a standard
-        configuration, and running no unnecessary services. The core
-        operating system with standard TCP/IP networking capabilities
-        should be sufficient. Also for the sake of simplicity, we also
-        assume that the file systems on all hosts are set up
-        identically. In the event that they are not, you should adapt
-        these instructions accordingly.
-      </para>
-    </listitem>
+  <formalpara>
 
-    <listitem>
-      <para>
-        Standard 100 Mbps or 1 gigabit Ethernet cards are installed on
-        each machine, along with the proper drivers for the cards, and
-        that all four hosts are connected through a standard-issue
-        Ethernet networking appliance such as a switch. (All machines
-        should use network cards with the same throughout. That is, all
-        four machines in the cluster should have 100 Mbps cards
-        <emphasis>or</emphasis> all four machines should have 1 Gbps
-        cards.) MySQL Cluster works in a 100 Mbps network; however,
-        gigabit Ethernet provides better performance.
-      </para>
+    <title>Host computer type</title>
 
-      <para>
-        Note that MySQL Cluster is <emphasis>not</emphasis> intended for
-        use in a network for which throughput is less than 100 Mbps or
-        which experiences a high degree of latency. For this reason
-        (among others), attempting to run a MySQL Cluster over a wide
-        area network such as the Internet is not likely to be
-        successful, and is not supported in production.
-      </para>
-    </listitem>
+    <para>
+      Each host computer in our installation scenario is an Intel-based
+      desktop PC running a supported operating system installed to disk
+      in a standard configuration, and running no unnecessary services.
+      The core operating system with standard TCP/IP networking
+      capabilities should be sufficient. Also for the sake of
+      simplicity, we also assume that the file systems on all hosts are
+      set up identically. In the event that they are not, you should
+      adapt these instructions accordingly.
+    </para>
 
-    <listitem>
-      <para>
-        For our sample data, we use the <literal>world</literal>
-        database which is available for download from the MySQL Web site
-        (see <ulink url="http://dev.mysql.com/doc/index-other.html"/>).
-        We assume that each machine has sufficient memory for running
-        the operating system, host NDB process, and (on the data nodes)
-        storing the database.
-      </para>
-    </listitem>
+  </formalpara>
 
-  </orderedlist>
+  <formalpara>
 
+    <title>Network hardware</title>
+
+    <para>
+      Standard 100 Mbps or 1 gigabit Ethernet cards are installed on
+      each machine, along with the proper drivers for the cards, and
+      that all four hosts are connected through a standard-issue
+      Ethernet networking appliance such as a switch. (All machines
+      should use network cards with the same throughout. That is, all
+      four machines in the cluster should have 100 Mbps cards
+      <emphasis>or</emphasis> all four machines should have 1 Gbps
+      cards.) MySQL Cluster works in a 100 Mbps network; however,
+      gigabit Ethernet provides better performance.
+    </para>
+
+  </formalpara>
+
+  <important>
+    <para>
+      MySQL Cluster is <emphasis>not</emphasis> intended for use in a
+      network for which throughput is less than 100 Mbps or which
+      experiences a high degree of latency. For this reason (among
+      others), attempting to run a MySQL Cluster over a wide area
+      network such as the Internet is not likely to be successful, and
+      is not supported in production.
+    </para>
+  </important>
+
+  <formalpara>
+
+    <title>Sample data</title>
+
+    <para>
+      We use the <literal>world</literal> database which is available
+      for download from the MySQL Web site (see
+      <ulink url="http://dev.mysql.com/doc/index-other.html"/>). We
+      assume that each machine has sufficient memory for running the
+      operating system, required MySQL Cluster processes, and (on the
+      data nodes) storing the database.
+    </para>
+
+  </formalpara>
+
   <para>
-    We assume that you already know how to perform a minimal
+    We also assume that you already know how to perform a minimal
     installation and configuration of the operating system with
     networking capability, or that you are able to obtain assistance in
     this elsewhere if needed.

@@ -276,7 +292,7 @@
   </para>
 
   <para>
-    For information about MySQL Cluster hardware, software, and
+    For general information about MySQL Cluster hardware, software, and
     networking requirements, see
     <xref linkend="mysql-cluster-overview-requirements"/>.
   </para>


Modified: trunk/refman-5.1/renamed-nodes.txt
===================================================================
--- trunk/refman-5.1/renamed-nodes.txt	2011-05-09 19:34:28 UTC (rev 26162)
+++ trunk/refman-5.1/renamed-nodes.txt	2011-05-10 07:55:50 UTC (rev 26163)
Changed blocks: 1, Lines Added: 1, Lines Deleted: 0; 848 bytes

@@ -90,6 +90,7 @@
 mysql-cluster-installing mysql-cluster-multi-install 2010-09-25
 mysql-cluster-limitations-unsupported-missing mysql-cluster-limitations-unsupported 2010-08-20
 mysql-cluster-multi-hardware-software-network mysql-cluster-overview-requirements 2010-09-24
+mysql-cluster-multi-computer mysql-cluster-installation 2012-05-09
 mysql-cluster-ndbinfo-config_params mysql-cluster-ndbinfo-config-params 2012-04-27
 mysql-cluster-news-5-1-41-ndb-6-2-19 mysql-cluster-news-5-1-51-ndb-6-2-19 2011-03-15
 mysql-cluster-news-5-1-41-ndb-6-3-33 mysql-cluster-news-5-1-44-ndb-6-3-33 2011-03-15


Thread
svn commit - mysqldoc@oter02: r26163 - in trunk: refman-5.0 refman-5.1jon.stephens10 May